Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Are do-while-false loops common?

Is there a reason to have code like:

do {
    // a lot of code that only needs to be run once
} while (FALSE);

when the code isn't defining a macro? I know it's a trick when it comes to macros, but is there a reason for it in normal code?

share|improve this question
    
While I don't actually know, it would at least allow you to break; out of the "single-iteration loop" should you need to. In theory this could reduce the use of large nested if statements. –  icabod Jan 7 '11 at 14:25
    
@marcog - Main difference is that appears to be a question about C. In particular, using them to implement the functionality of C++'s exceptions. Since this is explicitly a C++ question (where none of that would apply), I think they are different questions. –  T.E.D. Jan 7 '11 at 15:53
add comment

marked as duplicate by marcog, Paul R, Ken Bloom, Alejandro, Josh Lee Jan 7 '11 at 19:51

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

6 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Well, it does allow you to use the break; (or continue) keyword for early exit if you have a need for that for some reason. That would be kinda ugly though. I'd really rather see it moved into its own routine, with the early exit implemented via a return; statement.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, that is ugly. To me, it indicates a poor job breaking things into subroutines (as you now mention). –  Justin Ardini Jan 7 '11 at 14:25
    
I agree with you. I've never liked unlimited loops, they just seem slimy to me :). It would be better to put the evaluation that exits the loop in the while condition - that's what it's there for. Anything else is usually just lazy programming. I equate break/continues as a veiled goto for lazy programmers, but that's my soapbox. :) –  SRM Jan 7 '11 at 14:28
    
Do you prefer early exits via return statements instead? In some of the code I'm looking at, the author could just replace the break statement with a return and remove the do - while. Is that better? –  Anon Jan 7 '11 at 14:32
    
@Anon: Yes, it is better. At least it does not misuse the do-while construct. Some people will argue that early return is a bad thing, though, but this is probably more a question of taste. Personally, I always use RAII which avoids most common problems with early returns. –  7vies Jan 7 '11 at 14:34
    
@Anon - Agree with 7vies, yes it is better. When I see do-while, I'm thinking loop, not straightline code. –  T.E.D. Jan 7 '11 at 15:41
show 2 more comments

Well one reason for it would be if you want to break out at some point.

i.e.

do
{
   //some code that should always execute...

   if ( condition )
   {
      //do some stuff
      break;
   }

   //some code that should execute if condition is not true

   if ( condition2 )
   {
       //do some more stuff
       break;
   }

   //further code that should not execute if condition or condition2 are true

}
while(false);

In certain situations the resulting code is a little bit more clear / easier to understand if written as above.

share|improve this answer
4  
You know what's always clearer than this and doesn't introduce an unnecessary block? goto. –  Steve M Jan 7 '11 at 15:33
    
@Steve M - Actually agree. However, there's plenty of code there IMHO to justify its own routine. If you do that, you can use return instead, which is a wee bit less uncontrolled than a goto, and doesn't draw such an atavistic response from dogmatic developers. –  T.E.D. Jan 7 '11 at 15:59
add comment

Such a construct is used as a kind of goto to be able to jump after the end of the loop using a break statement inside.

share|improve this answer
5  
I'm not a fan of calling other control structures "a kind of goto". Every control structure is "a kind of goto". Its the differences that make them interesting, not the similarities. –  T.E.D. Jan 7 '11 at 14:26
1  
Of course every control structure is a goto at the machine level, but at the language level, a goto is a goto statement and not an if statement. –  Blagovest Buyukliev Jan 7 '11 at 14:35
add comment

I would not do this but:

I looks slightly more logical than just braces

int main()
{
    {
        std::ifstream file("Data");
        // DO STUFF

    }  // Data now closed.

    // LOTS OF STUFF SO YOU CANT SEE file2 below.

    // We can re-use data here as it was closed.
    std::ofstream file2("Data");
    // DO STUFF
 }

An unobservant maintainer may see the braces and think.
What the heck and remove them

int main()
{
    std::ifstream file("Data");
    // DO STUFF

    // LOTS OF STUFF SO YOU CANT SEE file2 below.

    // FAIL. data is still open from before.
    std::ofstream file2("Data");
    // DO STUFF
}

I suppose using the while tick at least make syou think about it (though an unobservant maintainer may still remove it).

int main()
{
    do
    {
        std::ifstream file("Data");
        // DO STUFF

    } while (false);

    // LOTS OF STUFF SO YOU CANT SEE file2 below.

    // We can re-use data here as it was closed.
    std::ofstream file2("Data");
    // DO STUFF
 }
share|improve this answer
add comment

There is no reason to ever write a loop that is known, at compile time, to execute exactly once.

Doing so, in order to pretend that goto is written as break, is abusive.

EDIT:

I've just realised that my assertion about compile-time knowledge is false: I suppose you might do something complicated with conditional #defines that might mean that, at compile time for one build configuration, it is known to execute once, but for a different build configuration, it is executed multiple times.

#ifdef SOMETHING
#define CONDITION (--x)
#else
#define CONDITION 0
#endif
...
int x = 5
do{
  ...
} while(CONDITION)

However, the spirit of my assertion still stands.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. do while(false) is a horrible anti-idiom outside of macros that simulate inline functions (which are their own brand of horrible). Also, if I ever saw a #define like that in real code, I would flip out. –  Steve M Jan 7 '11 at 15:37
    
Yeah, the #define is a rather crazy example, and I can't come up with a justification for using it IRL. I just didn't want some pedant giving me a lesson on the precompiler. –  Paul Butcher Jan 7 '11 at 15:55
add comment

It can be used to implement a behavior similar to goto statement, or say jump behavior!

See this:

do
{       
   if (doSomething() != 0) break; //jump
   if (doSomethingElse() != 0) break; //jump
   ...
   if (doSomethingElseNew() != 0) break; //jump
 } while(false);

 //if any of the break encountered, execution can continue from here, just after the do-while block! 

 // statement1
 // statement2
 // statement3
 // so on

Taken from here: Are do-while-false loops common?

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.