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We have three entities with bidirectional many-to-many mappings in a A <-> B <-> C "hierarchy" like so (simplified, of course):

@Entity
Class A {
  @Id int id;
  @JoinTable(
    name = "a_has_b",
    joinColumns = {@JoinColumn(name = "a_id", referencedColumnName = "id")},
    inverseJoinColumns = {@JoinColumn(name = "b_id", referencedColumnName = "id")})
  @ManyToMany
  Collection<B> bs;
}

@Entity
Class B {
  @Id int id;
  @JoinTable(
    name = "b_has_c",
    joinColumns = {@JoinColumn(name = "b_id", referencedColumnName = "id")},
    inverseJoinColumns = {@JoinColumn(name = "c_id", referencedColumnName = "id")})
  @ManyToMany(fetch=FetchType.EAGER,
    cascade=CascadeType.MERGE,CascadeType.PERSIST,CascadeType.REFRESH})
  @org.hibernate.annotations.Fetch(FetchMode.SUBSELECT)
  private Collection<C> cs;
  @ManyToMany(mappedBy = "bs", fetch=FetchType.EAGER,
    cascade={CascadeType.MERGE,CascadeType.PERSIST,  CascadeType.REFRESH})
  @org.hibernate.annotations.Fetch(FetchMode.SUBSELECT)
  private Collection<A> as;
}

@Entity
Class C {
  @Id int id;
  @ManyToMany(mappedBy = "cs", fetch=FetchType.EAGER, 
    cascade={CascadeType.MERGE,CascadeType.PERSIST,  CascadeType.REFRESH})
  @org.hibernate.annotations.Fetch(FetchMode.SUBSELECT)
  private Collection<B> bs;
}

There's no conecpt of an orphan - the entities are "standalone" from the application's point of view - and most of the time we're going to have a fistful of A:s, each with a couple of B:s (some may be "shared" among the A:s), and some 1000 C:s, not all of which are always "in use" by any B. We've concluded that we need bidirectional relations, since whenever an entity instance is removed, all links (entries in the join tables) have to be removed too. That is done like this:

void removeA( A a ) {
  if ( a.getBs != null ) {
    for ( B b : a.getBs() ) {  //<--------- ConcurrentModificationException here
      b.getAs().remove( a ) ;
      entityManager.merge( b );
    }
  }
  entityManager.remove( a );
}

If the collection, a.getBs() here, contains more than one element, then a ConcurrentModificationException is thrown. I've been banging my head for a while now, but can't think of a reasonable way of removing the links without meddling with the collection, which makes underlying the Iterator angry.

Q1: How am I supposed to do this, given the current ORM setup? (If at all...)

Q2: Is there a more reasonable way do design the OR-mappings that will let JPA (provided by Hibernate in this case) take care of everything. It'd be just swell if we didn't have to include those I'll be deleted now, so everybody I know, listen carefully: you don't need to know about this!-loops, which aren't working anyway, as it stands...

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Matt is correct but I thought I'd add some additional information about other ways to work around the problem.

The issue is that the collections inside of A, B, and C are magical Hibernate collections so when you run the following statement:

  b.getAs().remove( a );

this removes a from b's collection but it also removes b from a's list which happens to be the collection being iterated over in the for loop. That generates the ConcurrentModificationException.

Matt's solution should work if you are really removing all elements in the collection. If you aren't however another work around is to copy all of the b's into a collection which removes the magical Hibernate collection from the process.

    for ( B b : new ArrayList<B>( a.getBs() )) {
       b.getAs().remove( a ) ;
       entityManager.merge( b );
    }

That should get you a little further down the road.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you really only need to remove the mapping from the owner side. –  Matt Ball Jan 8 '11 at 14:08
    
This idea, using a detached collection (I actually did it even uglier and passed the collection as a parameter to the removeX methods) finally does the job. It means another DB roundtrip but for the time being, we can live with that. Thanks! –  Gustav Carlson Jan 11 '11 at 10:43
    
Glad it worked @Gustav. I don't see how it will result in another DB roundtrip however. There is one with the getBs() which you were doing before and one for each remove which you were also doing before. I'm not sure if the merge will generate a db call. –  Gray Jan 12 '11 at 15:10

This problem has nothing to do with the ORM, as far as I can tell. You cannot use the syntactic-sugar foreach construct in Java to remove an element from a collection.

Note that Iterator.remove is the only safe way to modify a collection during iteration; the behavior is unspecified if the underlying collection is modified in any other way while the iteration is in progress.

Source

Simplified example of the problematic code:

List<B> bs = a.getBs();
for (B b : bs)
{
    if (/* some condition */)
    {
        bs.remove(b); // throws ConcurrentModificationException
    }
}

You must use the Iterator version to remove elements while iterating. Correct implementation:

List<B> bs = a.getBs();
for (Iterator<B> iter = bs.iterator(); iter.hasNext();)
{
    B b = iter.next();
    if (/* some condition */)
    {
        iter.remove(); // works correctly
    }
}

Edit: I think this will work; untested however. If not, you should stop seeing ConcurrentModificationExceptions but instead (I think) you'll see ConstraintViolationExceptions.

void removeA(A a)
{
    if (a != null)
    {
        a.setBs(new ArrayList<B>()); // wipe out all of a's Bs
        entityManager.merge(a);      // synchronize the state with the database
        entityManager.remove(a);     // removing should now work without ConstraintViolationExceptions
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply. But is that really what's going on in my case? I don't see that I'm explicitly modifying the Collection iterated over, but rather removing stuff from <b>its</b> member field (a Collection). Does EntityManager.merge(T t) affect the Iterator which gave me the t? –  Gustav Carlson Jan 7 '11 at 15:55
    
@Gustav: Does EntityManager.merge(T t) affect the Iterator which gave me the t? Honestly, I can't say for sure, without testing it. There's a lot that goes on under the hood when using EntityManager (this is mostly a good thing). N.B. I had a small (but significant) typo in my answer. The second bs.remove(b) should have been iter.remove(). That said, when removing an A a, I think that you only need to remove a's Bs. See my edit; I think it will suffice. –  Matt Ball Jan 7 '11 at 16:16
    
@Matt: This does indeed seem very reasonable. It doesn't quite work as expected though: when I do what you suggest in your edit, I get a javax.persistence.EntityNotFoundException: deleted entity passed to persist: [<type.of.A.here>#<null>]. Without the remove, the join table entries are deleted nicely, so your idea of just wiping clean on one side of the relation does that part of the job! However, I've tried playing around with flush() ing before the remove() a.s.o., but it still won't work the whole way... Seen this before? –  Gustav Carlson Jan 8 '11 at 14:29
    
@Gustav: which call throws the exception? entityManager.remove(a);? I'm not sure, off the top of my head - but try changing entityManager.merge(a); to entityManager.persist(a);. –  Matt Ball Jan 8 '11 at 15:10
    
@Gustav: I just remembered that merge() returns a copy of the object you pass in, so try remove()-ing that one: entityManager.remove(entityManager.merge(a)); –  Matt Ball Jan 8 '11 at 15:44

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