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So I have a simple test case WCF service. The idea is that one process calls another and registers for callbacks, and the other then calls the original caller when events occur. WCF native callbacks don't work properly, or for this application, so don't bother suggesting that. I have a very simple test program that exhibits the behavior. Every 10 tries, it will pause for a while (the timeout period) and the recover after it. It recovers without firing any channel events - open/close/whatever. I have to be missing something obviously, but what...

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.ServiceModel;
using System.Threading;

namespace WCFTest
{
 [ServiceContract(Namespace = "http://WCF.WTF")]
 public interface IServerEvents
 {
  [OperationContract(IsOneWay = true)]
  void Heartbeat();
 }

 [ServiceContract(Namespace = "http://WCF.WTF")]
 public interface ICallbackEvents
 {
  [OperationContract(IsOneWay = true)]
  void HeartbeatAck();
 }

 [ServiceBehavior(ConcurrencyMode = ConcurrencyMode.Multiple, InstanceContextMode =     InstanceContextMode.Single)]
 [CallbackBehavior(IncludeExceptionDetailInFaults = true)]
 class Program : IServerEvents, ICallbackEvents
 {
  static AutoResetEvent CalledBack = new AutoResetEvent(false);
  static ChannelFactory<IServerEvents> ServerChannelFactory;
  static ChannelFactory<ICallbackEvents> ClientChannelFactory;
  static ServiceHost ServerHost;
  static ServiceHost ClientHost;

  static int Timeout = 5;

  private Program()
  {
  }

  static void Main(string[] args)
  {
   NetTcpBinding binding = new NetTcpBinding(SecurityMode.None)
    {
     OpenTimeout = new TimeSpan(0, 0, Timeout),
     SendTimeout = new TimeSpan(0, 0, Timeout),
     ReceiveTimeout = new TimeSpan(0, 0, Timeout),
     MaxConnections = 50,
     ListenBacklog = 50     
    };
   Uri serverUri = new Uri("net.tcp://localhost:3123/WTF");
   ServerChannelFactory = new ChannelFactory<IServerEvents>(binding, new     EndpointAddress(serverUri));
   ClientChannelFactory = new ChannelFactory<ICallbackEvents>(binding, new     EndpointAddress("net.tcp://localhost:3123/WTF/Client"));
   ServerChannelFactory.Closing += new EventHandler((s,x) =>     Console.WriteLine("SClosing"));
   ServerChannelFactory.Opening += new EventHandler((s, x) => Console.WriteLine("SOpening"));
   ServerChannelFactory.Faulted += new EventHandler((s,x)=> Console.WriteLine("SFaulted"));
   ClientChannelFactory.Closing += new EventHandler((s, x) => Console.WriteLine("CClosing"));
   ClientChannelFactory.Opening += new EventHandler((s, x) => Console.WriteLine("COpening"));
   ClientChannelFactory.Faulted += new EventHandler((s, x) => Console.WriteLine("CFaulted"));

   ServerHost = StartServer("/Server", new Program(), typeof(IServerEvents));
   ClientHost = StartServer("/Client", new Program(), typeof(ICallbackEvents));

   while (true)
   {
    Thread.Sleep(100);
    try
    {
     new Program().Heartbeat();
     if (!CalledBack.WaitOne(2500, true))
     {
      throw new TimeoutException("Epic fail.");
     }
    }
    catch (Exception x)
    {
     Console.WriteLine("Failed heartbeat.\n{0}", x);
    }
   }
  }

  public void Heartbeat()
  {
   Console.Write(".");
   Console.Out.Flush();
   try
   {
    ClientChannelFactory.CreateChannel().HeartbeatAck();
   }
   catch (Exception x)
   {
    Console.WriteLine("Couldn't ACK heartbeat.\n{0}", x);
   }
  }

  public void HeartbeatAck()
  {
   Console.Write("!");
   Console.Out.Flush();
   CalledBack.Set();
  }

  private static ServiceHost StartServer<T>(string fragment, T remoteObject, Type interfaceType)
  {
   ServiceHost retHost = null;
   using (AutoResetEvent revent = new AutoResetEvent(false))
   {
bool hostOk = false;
// The service host has to be started on a non-sync-context thread or bad things (tm) will happen.
ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem((oo) =>
{
 try
 {
  retHost = new ServiceHost(remoteObject, new Uri("net.tcp://localhost:3123/WTF"));
  var binding = new NetTcpBinding(SecurityMode.None)
      {
       OpenTimeout = new TimeSpan(0, 0, Timeout),
       SendTimeout = new TimeSpan(0, 0, Timeout),
       ReceiveTimeout = new TimeSpan(0, 0, Timeout),
       MaxConnections = 50,
       ListenBacklog = 50           
      };
  retHost.AddServiceEndpoint(interfaceType, binding, fragment);
      retHost.Open();
      hostOk = true;
     }
     catch (Exception xc)
     {
      Console.WriteLine("Couldn't start WCF Service Host!\n{0}", xc);
     }
     finally
     {
      try { revent.Set(); }
      catch { }
     }
    });
    revent.WaitOne(5000, true);
    return hostOk ? retHost : null;
   }
  }
 }
}
share|improve this question
2  
Extra points to anyone who reads all that. –  John Saunders Jan 7 '11 at 16:07
1  
BTW, this sort of thing often means you're not calling Dispose on some object that implements IDisposable. –  John Saunders Jan 7 '11 at 16:08
    
Question: why do you make your service a singleton?? This just calls for trouble.... best practice is to have per-call service activation - would be much easier to program, too! –  marc_s Jan 7 '11 at 16:11
    
I would also recommend not to make your console app implement the service contract. Put the service contract implementation into a separate service class.... –  marc_s Jan 7 '11 at 16:18
    
this is all just to make a simple test case. the real thing is as you guys say. –  Max Metral Jan 7 '11 at 16:24

2 Answers 2

[This isn't an answer, but too long to fit as a comment.]

The test case differs from the original code. In cases where you aren't really sure where a problem exists, its quite unhelpful to change the code base as it skew's the results.

Instead, mock out the client and the server so you can unit test the two seperately. WcfTestClient acts a client quite well.

Due to the nature of services, I recommend keeping near 0 logic in the primary layer and instead bounce the implementations into a re-useable DLL (a mating of MVC and n-tier). This makes it super easy to lay a new front end on the WCF service (like a console app) for debugging purposes.

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't really make sense to me honestly. The test case fails in the exact same way. So while it's possible that fixing this test case doesn't fix the real thing, it's pretty damn unlikely. And a risk I'm certainly willing to take when the upside is that smart people like yourself can actually look at and run the example. –  Max Metral Jan 7 '11 at 16:56
    
Its good that your test case fails the same way. Yes, that does give a lot of confidence that fixing the test will translate to the program. But, there's still plenty of fat that can be trimmed from the example. I want to help, but as other's have hinted to, I don't want to look at that huge pile of code that still has plenty of potential to be reduced down to the actual problem set on your end. Using some simple concepts (as explained above) you can do this yourself and improve maintainability at the same time. –  P.Brian.Mackey Jan 7 '11 at 20:03
    
It really doesn't have much potential to be reduced. Sure, I can take out a bunch of the exception handling and printing of problems, but that's kind of the whole point. The concepts above would make this MORE code to dig through (separate classes, more dlls, not being a console app)... It's fine, I get that someday somebody might run this example and see that WCF is broken, but most likely they won't and I'll just eventually find a workaround or end up writing a TCP server. –  Max Metral Jan 7 '11 at 21:22
up vote 0 down vote accepted

So I think the fundamental problem here is bad documentation and bad runtime reporting. While it was not easy to confirm, there seems to be some limit (not MaxConnections/ListenBackLog) of 10 active connections. Since Dispose is called whenever, the ChannelFactory will release it's connection whenever. As a result, 10 connections get used up and it pauses (while making a socket request, NOT while doing "real WCF" activities that would be subject to specified timeouts) until Dispose runs. So this means you can't store Open channel factories "long term" in WCF, which I think is bad, especially since you can't open and close factories multiple times. So the best you can do is store Bindings/EndpointAddresses.

share|improve this answer
1  
the use of Dispose is very well documented. You decided you didn't need to call Dispose, which is meant to free resources quickly. What happened is that the resources didn't get freed quickly enough, and ran out. Surprise, surprise! –  John Saunders Jan 9 '11 at 5:16
    
Well, not exactly since the objects that would need disposing are NOT IDisposable, which is sort of the whole problem. –  Max Metral Feb 28 '11 at 19:42

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