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I have a method that many threads access in parallel which uses a class with two synchronized methods that I have no control over. getObject and createNewObject. I want to be sure that I do not create several objects (MyObject).

MyObject obj;
public void method1() {
   obj = getObject("key");
   if (obj == null)
      obj = createNewObject("key");
  }

this, I think, would not work as the thread could be suspended between the getting and creating methods so another thread could come in and create an object as well. The synchronized createNewObject method fixes this by checking if an object already exists named "key" and throwing an exception in that case.

Which of the following methods would be preffered? Performance, safety and design wise. I've heard that the double locking type (method 3) doesn't work? Maybe I should just use the method1?

Most of the times, the object will be found so there's no problem. It might be better performance to skip synchronization and handle the exception in those rare cases?

MyObject obj;
public synchronized void method1() {
   obj = getObject("key");
   if (obj == null)
      obj = createNewObject("key");
  }

public void method2() {
   obj = getObject("key");
   if (obj == null)
       try {
          obj = createNewObject("key");
       } catch (Exception e) { // ops, someone already created object "key"
            obj = getObject();
       }
  }

public void method3() {
   obj = getObject("key");
   if (obj == null)
       obj = getObj("key");
}
public synchronized MyObject getObj(String key) {
    MyObject obj = getObject(key);
    if (obj == null)
        obj = createNewObject(key);
    return obj;
 }
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2  
Check ibm.com/developerworks/java/library/j-dcl.html for details on why method3 won't be working. –  gabuzo Jan 7 '11 at 16:30

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This needs some testing and profiling, but I'm fairly sure you won't gain any significant performance by using any tricks because the synchronization will be performed in any case, as you call getObject() method every time, which is synchronized. So this is not "synchronization / no synchronization" kind of difference, but rather "synchronization / double synchronization" which shouldn't be that much. If you are synchronizing anyway, it is better to do it to the full extent. Which means method1() in your case.

UPDATE

While method2() may look promising too, I have just realized a problem with it: since it doesn't synchronize the write to the obj field, other threads may not see its updated value. So if the obj fields is accessed by other threads than the thread that calls method2(), then method2() isn't correct.

If you make the obj field volatile, I believe it may work (not 100% sure though) since getObject() is synchronized so there should be no "volatile reference to a non-volatile object" problem. After getObject() returns, it performs a write barrier, so it is guaranteed that a fully initialized object will exist in the main memory. And since no thread has a locally cached copy of that object, it should be okay for any thread to access the obj field. Unless the object referenced by the obj field is mutable, in which case all access to it should be synchronized anyway.

This still doesn't make much sense, though. A completely non-synchronized read access is still impossible, so a clean implementation is still better than a "smart" one.

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RE: Method2. But the createNewObject metod is synchronized, and if you're trying to create an object with a key that already exists an exception is thrown. So the only thing that could happen is that another thread sees the obj field is null just before someone writes to it. So the thread tries to create the object itself but receives an exception because another thread just created the object. –  KTrum Jan 9 '11 at 11:36
    
@Karl, if the obj field is not volatile then another thread could see it as null even after someone writes to it. –  Sergey Tachenov Jan 9 '11 at 11:53
    
@Sergey, yes, I understand that, but the consequences of that should only be that the other thread tries to create a new object (synchronized) and will get an exception right? Because the createNewObject call will see that an object already has been created. The createNewObject has an internal hashmap to keep track of created objects, and all access to this hashmap is synchronized. –  KTrum Jan 9 '11 at 15:29
    
@Karl, that is assuming that other threads don't access the obj field before calling method2(). If one thread calls method2() to create the object, and another thread later tries to access it without a prior call to method2(), it may see null. –  Sergey Tachenov Jan 9 '11 at 15:37
    
@Sergey, Ah, I see your point. This "method2" is called from the constructor so an access to the field when it's null should not be possible. –  KTrum Jan 9 '11 at 20:47

Start off using method1 until a profiler tells you it is a bottle-neck. It is the cleanest implementation and you know it will work correctly all of the time. If later you see data that shows that you are wasting lots of time with successive calls, then you can think about trying something else.

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And, re-acquiring an already owned mutex is pretty darn fast in modern jvms, so method1 is definitely preferred and will most likely not perform any differently and the original. –  jtahlborn Jan 7 '11 at 20:38
    
'Premature optimization is the root of all evil' –  Qix Dec 9 '12 at 8:35

Synchronisation in modern VMs consumes very little in resources/time of execution. I would simply synchronise around the check/create methods. Premature optimisation will cost you a lot of time/heartache and you're better off worrying about this sort of thing if and when it becomes a problem.

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You say you have no control over createNewObject, so under those circumstances method1 is the right answer and I just upvoted someone who said so. But it sounds to me like createNewObject is poorly designed. If it's going to check if the object already exists, then in that case it should return that object rather than throwing an exception. It's silly to require a caller to check if the object exists, and if it doesn't call a function that then repeats the check of whether the object exists.

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EDIT: Below I wrote the Double checked locking ideom, but it has some significant flaws, which are described in

---- Original answer below ----

The best solution is this:

Object obj;

public Object getObject() {
    if( obj == null ) {
        synchronized(this) { // or on something else
            if( obj == null ) {
                obj = createObject();
            }
        }
    }
    return obj;  
}   

private Object createObject() {
    ...
} 

It has the advantage that synchronizing occures only in the critical creation phase of the object, but still works.

share|improve this answer
    
isn't this really the same as my method3? I heard that this double locking mechanism is bad somehow. –  KTrum Jan 7 '11 at 18:08
    
Yes it is. I would favor it. But I still have to read the IBM article posted in the comment of your question, I might contain further knowledge. –  Daniel Jan 7 '11 at 19:18
    
This code is slightly different than listing 7 from the IBM article. I think that since the second check is against the final location and not the temp variable that is storing the object being constructed, it might be ok. This is just speculation and I could see a compiler trying to optimize a function that is just return new Object() into being the same as obj = new Object(). I fall back to my answer as I'd rather not have code that is depended on implementation details. –  unholysampler Jan 7 '11 at 20:26
    
this is double checked locking and is broken. –  jtahlborn Jan 7 '11 at 20:39
    
Yes, you are right. This is broken and I was wrong. It has to be slightly modified to use a volatile object... but it seems, that the Initialize-On-Demand Holder Class idiom should be the option of choice. . –  Daniel Jan 8 '11 at 0:49

After reading a bit, I believe a really best answer would be to use the Initialize-On-Demand Holder Class idiom:

private static class LazySomethingHolder {
    public static Something something = new Something();
}

public static Something getInstance() {
    return LazySomethingHolder.something;
}

It has no concurrency problems and no locking even for volatile variables on the common path.

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