Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I need to add an expires header to my .less files in IIS7. Not quite sure how to do it.

share|improve this question
    
Are your .less files generated dynamically or are they static files? –  wweicker Jan 7 '11 at 18:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If your .less files are all located in the same folder you could specify the httpExpires attribute for static content with an additional web.config in this specific folder:

<system.webServer>
    <staticContent>
        <clientCache
            httpExpires="Sun, 29 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT" 
            cacheControlMode="UseExpires" />
    </staticContent>
</system.webServer>

Or add the same section in your root web.config and define the location path for the folder containing the .less files:

<location path="YourLessFilesFolder">
    <system.webServer>
        <staticContent>
            <clientCache
                httpExpires="Sun, 29 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT" 
                cacheControlMode="UseExpires" />
        </staticContent>
    </system.webServer>
</location>

You would also need to add the .less files to the collection of static content types (see). I'm not sure about the MIME type, but you get the idea:

<system.webServer>
    <staticContent>
        <mimeMap fileExtension=".less" mimeType="text/css" />
    </staticContent>
</system.webServer>
share|improve this answer

Be careful with setting the httpExpires date, I would not use a higher value than one year. You have no possibility to replace the cached files from proxy severs and clients until the expier date is reached. In your example in 20 years!

Use cache validation instead of expiration to be on the save side.

Or use:

<clientCache cacheControlMode="UseMaxAge" cacheControlMaxAge="1.00:00:00" />

to cache files for one day.

More Information here.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.