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I need an algorithm that converts an arbitrarily sized unsigned integer (which is stored in binary format) to a decimal one. i.e. to make it human-readable ;)
I currently use the maybe (or obviously) somewhat naive way of continuously calculating the modulus and remainder through division through ten.
Unfortunately the speed is somewhat... lame.

e.g. I calculate 2000^4000 (with my bignum library) which takes roughly 1.5 seconds (no flaming please xD). The print including the necessary base conversion however takes about 15 minutes which is quite annoying.

I have tested bc which does both in a lot less than one second.
How does it do that? (Not the multiplication stuff with ffts and whatever only the base conversion)

share|improve this question
    
Can you post your code? – John Kugelman Jan 7 '11 at 16:58
    
Exactly how is your bignum stored? Or if you don't know that, how are you allowed to access it? – Null Set Jan 7 '11 at 17:17
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I currently use the maybe (or obviously) somewhat naive way of continuously calculating the modulus and remainder through division through ten.
Then you should have O(n^2) complexity, which should fare much better than 15 minutes.

Although, it's worth looking how exactly you do division by 10.

  1. Make sure you apply not generic division of long by long, but simpler algorithm of division long number by standard one.
  2. Make sure that you reuse memory. Allocating 10Kb blocks 10000 times would surely hinder your performance.

edit
How to divide long binary number by 10 in one pass and get both result and reminder. With no additional memory.
Simple pseudo-code (a[0] is the highest order digit)

int r = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
    r = r * 2 + a[i];
    a[i] = r / 10;
    r = r % 10;
}

Let's take an example, number 100111011 = 315.

Step 0: r = 1, a[0] = 0
Step 1: r = 2, a[1] = 0
Step 2: r = 4, a[2] = 0
Step 3: r = 9, a[3] = 0
Step 4: r = 9, a[4] = 1
Step 5: r = 9, a[5] = 1
Step 6: r = 8, a[6] = 1
Step 7: r = 7, a[7] = 1
Step 8: r = 5, a[8] = 1

So, reminder is 5 and the result is 000011111 = 31.

share|improve this answer
    
What is that simpler algorithm? – Null Set Jan 7 '11 at 17:52
    
The memory isn't the issue. Or... at least I believe so ;) But number one seems to be the key. I am actually doing general arbitrarily sized divisions. I guess I can optimize that a LOT. Thanks +1 for that. – iolo Jan 7 '11 at 17:56
    
@iolo #2 is not about memory consumption: I believe excessive allocating of memory can affect speed as well. – Nikita Rybak Jan 7 '11 at 18:02
    
@Null I'll update post with example. It's really simple. – Nikita Rybak Jan 7 '11 at 18:03
    
great dude! I wrote a new division algorithm and instantly arrived at 3.5 seconds. And it appears you were right with the memory allocations as well. Thanks! :) – iolo Jan 8 '11 at 11:23

I think that bc is using 10^n as base instead of 2. So every internal "digit" is just n decimal digits and at least for decimal input/output the problem becomes trivial.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Good point, I forgot that option. 9 decimal digits fit just nicely into 32-bit signed integer. – Nikita Rybak Jan 7 '11 at 18:45
    
@Nikita: Once upon a time, BCD was in common use (well, more so than now, anyhow; for example, there were BCD specific instructions in the MOS 6502's instruction set), and the typical encoding used 4-bits per decimal digit. Not packed as tight as theoretically possible but a bit easier to deal with. – ephemient Jan 8 '11 at 6:39
    
@ephemient: It wasn't just the 6502 :-) ... actually many processors have that kind of support; for example the one that are you're probably using right now (see siyobik.info/index.php?module=x86&id=69) – 6502 Jan 8 '11 at 7:37
    
I just thought using the 6502 as an example was apropos given your username :-) Know of anybody still using those parts of the x86 ISA? I don't. – ephemient Jan 8 '11 at 8:27
    
@ephemient: actually even on 6502 apparently wasn't that common to rely on that. When writing my 6502 emulator (you can find it in my dead homepage) in one of the early versions had a bug in the handling of decimal mode, but the whole virtual Apple][ was working correctly including the BASIC interpreter, with just the exception IIRC of the handling of floats by print or input statement - can't rememer which of the two - and that was how I discovered the bug. I think that the presence of decimal mode in CPUs is just one of the many crimes perpetrated by COBOL. – 6502 Jan 8 '11 at 13:08

There's no need to use exponentiation:

#include "stdio.h"
#include "stdlib.h"
#include "string.h"

int main(){
    char a[] = "10011";
    unsigned long int res= 0;
    int i;

    for(i = 0; i < strlen(a); i++){
        res = (res<<1) + (a[i]-'0');
    }

    printf("%d",res);
    return 0;
}

FIRST UPDATE

Now length shouldn't be a problem...

#include "stdio.h"
#include "stdlib.h"
#include "string.h"

char *doubles(char *);
char *sum(char *,int);

int main(){
    char a[] = "10011";
    char *res = calloc(2,sizeof(char));
    int i;

    res[0] = '0';
    for(i = 0; i < strlen(a); i++){
        res = sum(doubles(res),(a[i]-'0'));
    }

    printf("%s",res);
    return 0;
}

char *doubles(char *s){
    int i,len = strlen(s),t = 0;
    char *d;
    d = calloc(len+1,sizeof(char));
    for(i = 0; i < len; i++){
        t = ((s[len-i-1]-'0')<<1) + t;

        d[len-i] = ('0' + (t%10));
        t = t/10;
    }

    d[0] = t+'0';

    return (d[0] == '0')?d+1:d;
}

char *sum(char *s,int n){
    int i, len = strlen(s),t = n;
    char *d = calloc(len+1,sizeof(char));

    for(i = 0; i < len ; i++){
        t = (s[len-i-1]-'0') + t;
        d[len-i] = ('0' + (t%10));
        t = t/10;
    }
    d[0] = t+'0';

    return (d[0] == '0')?d+1:d;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Where 'res' is 2000^4000? Well-well. – Nikita Rybak Jan 7 '11 at 17:37
    
This is just an algorithm to calculate the decimal rapresentation of a number given a binary one, without using exponentiation. but probably i got the question wrong... sorry ( and i still can't see why he should calculate 2000^4000) – kaharas Jan 7 '11 at 17:40
    
Exponentiation is only used for calculation of 2000^4000 anyway so it is not important for this issue. And as Nikita said that number doesn't fit into a standard data type which is actually the source of this problem. But this is a general issue with bignums. Besides the library is self-written, thus I do not want to use third party libraries. – iolo Jan 7 '11 at 17:45
    
Updated, Now data type size shouldn't be a problem. – kaharas Jan 7 '11 at 18:14

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