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I have

int i = 6;

and I want

char c = '6'

by conversion. Any simple way to suggest?

EDIT: also i need to generate a random number, and convert to a char, then add a '.txt' and access it in an ifstream.

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char *c = itoa(i, 10); –  yozhik Jan 7 '11 at 21:48

9 Answers 9

up vote 106 down vote accepted

Straightforward way:

char[] digits = {'0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9' };
char aChar = digits[i];

Safer way:

char aChar = '0' + i;

Generic way:

itoa(i, ...)

Handy way:

sprintf(myString, "%d", i)

C++ way: (taken from Dave18 answer)

std::ostringstream oss;
oss << 6;

Boss way:

Joe, write me an int to char converter

SO way:

Guys, how do I avoid reading beginner's guide to C++?

Comment: I've added Handy way and C++ way (to have a complete collection) and I'm saving this as a wiki.

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1  
You meant "boss" as in superior, but I read it as in "boss", as in "Bruce Springsteen is the boss." Maybe you could revise for that case? –  g33kz0r May 1 '13 at 18:10

This will only work for int-digits 0-9, but your question seems to suggest that might be enough.

It works by adding the ASCII value of char '0' to the integer digit.

int i=6;
char c = '0'+i;  // now c is '6'

For example:

'0'+0 = '0'
'0'+1 = '1'
'0'+2 = '2'
'0'+3 = '3'

Edit

It is unclear what you mean, "work for alphabets"? If you want the 5th letter of the alphabet:

int i=5;
char c = 'A'-1 + i; // c is now 'E', the 5th letter.

Note that because in C/Ascii, A is considered the 0th letter of the alphabet, I do a minus-1 to compensate for the normally understood meaning of 5th letter.

Adjust as appropriate for your specific situation.
(and test-test-test! any code you write)

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Awesome, would it work for alphabets? –  user963241 Jan 7 '11 at 18:44
    
char c = 'A'+i. –  EboMike Jan 7 '11 at 18:45
    
Confusing when choosing between small and capital letters. –  user963241 Jan 7 '11 at 19:00
3  
Well, you need to tell us what you want. "Work for alphabets" really isn't very descriptive. –  EboMike Jan 7 '11 at 19:06
    
How int i=345; will work here? –  iOS Aug 12 '13 at 12:10

Just FYI, if you want more than single digit numbers you can use sprintf:

char txt[16];
int myNum = 20;
sprintf(txt, "%d", myNum);

Then the first digit is in a char at txt[0], and so on.

(This is the C approach, not the C++ approach. The C++ way would be to use stringstreams.)

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3  
Always prefer snprintf over sprintf (consider a hypothetical system with 128 bit ints or whatever). +1 anyway for an approach that won't break in character sets where the numbers aren't consecutive. –  Mark B Jan 7 '11 at 19:24
1  
@Mark B: Standard C requires that the numbers be consecutive. –  Billy ONeal Jan 7 '11 at 20:24
    
@Mark Right, that's definitely safer from a buffer-overflow perspective. –  Nathan S. Jan 7 '11 at 21:04

itoa()

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdlib/itoa/

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I like this approach better than the character arithmetic suggested by abelenky because it doesn't depend on working with the ASCII character set (even though that is a fairly safe assumption for many applications). However, itoa stores its result in a string, so you need to provide a character array and extract the character from it. Your answer would be more helpful to neophytes if you edited it to show those extra steps. –  A. Levy Jan 7 '11 at 18:56
3  
-1 both for itoa (nonstandard MS function) and for linking to perhaps the worst site for C and C++ [mis]information. –  R.. Jan 7 '11 at 19:00
    
Perhaps might you know a standard way R..? thanks. –  user963241 Jan 7 '11 at 19:02
    
"standard" way in C++ would be using streams, all the other methods mentioned so far have some problems. –  Gene Bushuyev Jan 7 '11 at 19:46
1  
well, then its inferior compared to cplusplus.com –  Newbie Jan 8 '11 at 17:37

This is how I converted a number to an ASCII code. 0 though 9 in hex code is 0x30-0x39. 6 would be 0x36.

unsigned int temp = 6;
or you can use unsigned char temp = 6;
unsigned char num;
 num = 0x30| temp;

this will give you the ASCII value for 6. You do the same for 0 - 9

to convert ASCII to a numeric value I came up with this code.

unsigned char num,code;
code = 0x39; // ASCII Code for 9 in Hex
num = 0&0F & code;
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"I have int i = 6; and I want char c = '6' by conversion. Any simple way to suggest?"

There are only 10 numbers. So write a function that takes an int from 0-9 and returns the ascii code. Just look it up in an ascii table and write a function with ifs or a select case.

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Alternative way, But non-standard.

int i = 6;
char c[2];
char *str = NULL;
if (_itoa_s(i, c, 2, 10) == 0)
   str = c;

Or Using standard c++ stringstream

 std::ostringstream oss;
 oss << 6;
share|improve this answer
    
itoa is non-standard and unsafe (could cause buffer overrun). –  EboMike Jan 7 '11 at 19:07
    
Thanks, fixed the overrun. –  cpx Jan 7 '11 at 19:14
    
Okay, you're edited it to the _s version now. Still non-standard, but I removed my downvote! –  EboMike Jan 7 '11 at 19:15
    
i think theres an error in the stream example you provided. –  Newbie Jan 7 '11 at 21:13
    
Right! I'm mistyped the object name which should be 'oss' :) –  cpx Jan 7 '11 at 21:41

If you want just small numbers between 0 and 255, I find this function quite useful. I use it to debug/show char variables in an ordinary LCD. The msg variable should have a length of 4.

void debug_int8(char* msg, char number) {
    char digits[] = {'0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9' };
    char d2, d1, d0;
    d2 = number / 100;                  //most-significative digit
    d1 = (number - d2 * 100) / 10;
    d0 = number - d2 * 100 - d1 * 10;   //least-significative digit
    msg[0] = digits[(short) d2];
    msg[1] = digits[(short) d1];
    msg[2] = digits[(short) d0];
    msg[3] = '\0';
}
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          A PROGRAM TO CONVERT INT INTO ASCII.




          #include<stdio.h>
          #include<string.h>
          #include<conio.h>

           char data[1000]= {' '};           /*thing in the bracket is optional*/
           char data1[1000]={' '};
           int val, a;
           char varray [9];

           void binary (int digit)
          {
              if(digit==0)
               val=48;
              if(digit==1)
               val=49;
              if(digit==2)
               val=50;
              if(digit==3)
               val=51;
              if(digit==4)
               val=52;
              if(digit==5)
               val=53;
              if(digit==6)
               val=54;
              if(digit==7)
               val=55;
              if(digit==8)
               val=56;
              if(digit==9)
                val=57;
                a=0;

           while(val!=0)
           {
              if(val%2==0)
               {
                varray[a]= '0';
               }

               else
               varray[a]='1';
               val=val/2;
               a++;
           }


           while(a!=7)
          {
            varray[a]='0';
            a++;
           }


          varray [8] = NULL;
          strrev (varray);
          strcpy (data1,varray);
          strcat (data1,data);
          strcpy (data,data1);

         }


          void main()
         {
           int num;
           clrscr();
           printf("enter number\n");
           scanf("%d",&num);
           if(num==0)
           binary(0);
           else
           while(num>0)
           {
           binary(num%10);
           num=num/10;
           }
           puts(data);
           getch();

           }

I check my coding and its working good.let me know if its helpful.thanks.

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you could work on your indentation... and think a lot about other problems in that code. –  harper May 31 '13 at 15:27

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