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My files:

cpu_add.h

#ifndef CPU_ADD_H
#define CPU_ADD_H

double add_double_double(double a, double b) {return (a+b);}
double add_int_double(int a, double b) {return ((double)(a)+b);}
int   add_int_int(int a, int b) {return (a+b);}

#endif

I am allowed only to use the functions above. Can't use the operator '+' in my own code.

poly_subtype.h

#ifndef POLY_SUBTYPE_H
#define POLY_SUBTYPE_H
#include <iostream>
#include "q3.h"
#include "cpu_add.h"
using std::cout;
using std::endl;

//Deriving classes definition
class IntClass;
class DoubleClass;

//The Virtual Number Class. IntClass and FloatClass will derive from this class.
class Number {
    public:
        //return a Number object that's the results of x+this, when x is DoubleClass
        virtual Number& addDouble(DoubleClass& x) = 0;

        //return a Number object that's the results of x+this, when x is IntClass
        virtual Number& addInt(IntClass& x) = 0;

        //return a Number object that's the results of x+this, when x is either
        //IntClass or DoubleClass
        virtual Number& operator+(Number& x) = 0;

        //Print the number stored in the object
        virtual void print_number() = 0;        
};

class IntClass : public Number {
    private:
        int my_number;
    public:
        //Constructor
        IntClass(int n):my_number(n) {}

        //returns the number stored in the object
        int get_number()  {return my_number;}

        //print the number stored in the object
        void print_number() {cout << my_number << endl;}

        //return a DoubleClass object that's the result of x+this
        Number& addDouble(DoubleClass& x);

        //return an IntClass object that's the result of x+this
        Number& addInt(IntClass& x);

        //return a Number object that's the result of x+this.
        //The actual class of the returned object depends on x.
        //If x is IntClass, then the result if IntClass.
        //If x is DoubleClass, then the results is DoubleClass.
        Number& operator+(Number& x);
};

class DoubleClass : public Number {
    private:
        double my_number;
    public:
        //Constructor
        DoubleClass(double n):my_number(n) {}

        //returns the number stored in the object
        double get_number()  {return my_number;}

        //Print the number stored in the object
        void print_number() {cout << my_number << endl;}

        //return a DoubleClass object that's the result of x+this
        Number& addDouble(DoubleClass& x);

        //return a DoubleClass object that's the result of x+this
        Number& addInt(IntClass& x);

        //return a DoubleClass object that's the result of x+this.
        //This should work if x is either IntClass or DoubleClass
        Number& operator+( Number& x);
};

#endif

I need to implement the next functions:

Number& IntClass::addInt(IntClass& x);
Number& IntClass::addDouble(DoubleClass& x);
Number& IntClass::operator+(Number& x);
Number& DoubleClass::addInt(IntClass& x);
Number& DoubleClass::addDouble(DoubleClass& x);
Number& DoubleClass::operator+(Number& x);

So for example in my the q3.h I wrote:

#ifndef Q3_H_
#define Q3_H_

#include "cpu_add.h"
#include "poly_subtype.h"

Number& IntClass::addInt(IntClass& x){
    IntClass num(add_int_int(my_number, x.get_number()));
    return num;
}
#endif /* Q3_H_ */

and I get the next error:

expected constructor, destructor, or type conversion before '&' token   q3.h    ‪/pl5‬  line 48 C/C++ Problem

What does it mean?

Thanks.

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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is caused because you put all your code in headers (maybe thinking the Java way?).

When you include poly_subtype.h it includes q3.h which then includes poly_subtype.h in an attempt to define various classes. Due to your include guards the second include has no effect. Then when the compiler attempts to compile q3.h it has no idea what the Number class is, and generates that error.

The fix to this is to put your method implementations into source files that are only compiled once. It will prevent the nested inclusion problems. Alternately I can't see why poly_subtype.h needs to include q3.h at all. If you remove that include it might fix it.

Also as a side note, IntClass::addInt returns a local by reference which is definitely incorrect although it may appear to work. You should instead return *this; which is the actual object being modified (I believe - it's hard to tell from your small sample).

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I did what you have offered in the alternative option and now it okay yet now I have the problem with the "side note". I am not supposed to modify any object. I am supposed to create a new one which will be the sum of this(my_number) and the x.getNumber() but at the same time I am supposed to return a number& so how can I do it? The declarations of the functions that I have to implement are not something I am allowed to change. They were given to me this way so..how can I do it? –  user550413 Jan 8 '11 at 9:48
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poly_subtype.h includes q3.h, and q3.h includes poly_subtype.h. Theoretically this is allowed, because of your multiple-inclusion guards; but I don't think it's a good idea :-)

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That's what include guards are for and sometimes can't be avoided. Granted I haven't even looked at his code though. I also didn't see he was including implementation in the header files. –  Falmarri Jan 7 '11 at 19:11
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Its because you have circular dependency:

Sya you have the file: x.cpp

X.cpp

 #include "poly_subtype.h"

Now the inheritance looks like this:

x.cpp
    // ---Included from x.cpp
    "poly_subtype.h"
        // ---Included from poly_subtype.h
        <iostream>               // OK
        "q3.h"
            // ---Included from q3.h
            "cpu_add.h"          // OK
            "poly_subtype.h"     // FAIL. poly_subtype.h guards kick in here.
                                 //       So no classes are defined.

                // DOUBLE FAIL
                // The class did not kick in becuase we failed to load the header file
                //
                // At this point IntClass has not been defined.
                Number& IntClass::addInt(IntClass& x){
                    IntClass num(add_int_int(my_number, x.get_number()));
                    return num;
                }
            // EXIT ---Included from q3.h

        "cpu_add.h"              // Already done. No Problem.

         class IntClass   // OOOPS. Whay to late.
                          //        declared after we need them

        // EXIT ---Included from poly_subtype.h
    // EXIT ---Included from x.cpp

The simple solution.
Only put declarations in header files. Leave all the implementation to the cpp file. Don't worry about all that inline optimization you think you are missing out on, its still going to happen with modern compilers (if the compiler wants it to happen it will).

In the header files forward declare any type that you are using only be reference or pointer. Only #include a file if you are deriving from it as a base or you have a member variable from the class. This should break all circular dependencies.

For simplicity one class per header file (within reason, you can bundle groups of classes if they are all very similar (use best judgment)).

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Of course that normally I wouldn't include the implementations in the .h file unless it's a template for example. The reason I did it is just because I was asked to do so in the course hw. Maybe it's just easier for them to check it this way although most of the time we weren't asked to do so. –  user550413 Jan 8 '11 at 9:43
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It is really dirty to write all your code in .h files. (there are exeptions of course, but not for a novice) .h files are headers. .cpp are implementation files where you write the implementation of functions.

and like TonyK said: your circular inclusion of files lead to mayhem.

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Of course that normally I wouldn't include the implementations in the .h file unless it's a template for example. The reason I did it is just because I was asked to do so in the course hw. Maybe it's just easier for them to check it this way although most of the time we weren't asked to do so. –  user550413 Jan 8 '11 at 9:44
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