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Very interesting thing. The simplest source code to find the result of equation: ax + b = 0. I was wonder, when double x = -13/12 = -1.000000; and double x = -12/13= 0.000000; (for a and b int(type converted) or double), but float or double x = -13f/12f = 1.083333 (that's right). What wrong with double?

and can the equation {double or float x = -((double or float)b)/a;} be right if {int a,b;}?? if it cannot be right - why?

int main()
{
 double a, b, x; 
 scanf("%f %f",&a, &b);
 fflush(stdin);
 if(a!=0)
 {x = -b/a; printf("x = %f", x);}
 else printf("There is no solve in your equation.");
 getchar();
 return 0;
}

thank you

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closed as not a real question by David Heffernan, R.., Jens Gustedt, Oliver Charlesworth, Graviton Jan 9 '11 at 13:59

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
you'll need to refine your post and ask a proper question, I can't discern one here; vote to close –  David Heffernan Jan 7 '11 at 19:58
1  
Should be scanf("%lf %lf",&a, &b); –  Loki Astari Jan 7 '11 at 23:36

2 Answers 2

In C, if you write

double x = 13/12;

The compiler will not treat the division as floating point division. Rather, it will do the division with integers, truncate the result, and store it in a double. More generally, C doesn't look at the type of the variable it's writing to when determining what type of arithmetic to do. It just looks at the type of the operands.

To fix this, write

double x = 13.0/12.0;

These literals have type double, so the division will work correctly.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for answer, but I get the numbers 13 and 12 by scanf() and keep them into double a and b - in this case, I have value, which does not look like 13.0 and equals, for example, 5.413783206930e-315#DEN. I thought, that problem was with type double or int type casting to double and ask you question about it, now it seems that problem with scanf(). –  kill Jan 7 '11 at 21:04
    
I think the issue that if you try to use scanf() to read a double, you want to use the format specific %lf (same with printf). Otherwise, you'll be essentially blasting your doubles with random bits. –  templatetypedef Jan 7 '11 at 21:20
    
Thank you, the program works well. I didn't know, what to do, because there is no format "%lf" in "Type Characters for scanf functions" in MSDN. I thought, that "%lf" correspond to long double, today I know, that double mistically equals to long double in windows. –  kill Jan 8 '11 at 9:14
    
The format for long double is %Lf. –  AProgrammer Jan 8 '11 at 9:31

You have the scanf types wrong:
They should be %lf NOT %f

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    double a, b, x;
    scanf("%lf %lf",&a, &b);
    fflush(stdin);
    if(a!=0)
    {
        x = -b/a;
        printf("x = %lf", x);
    }
    else
        printf("There is no solve in your equation.");
    return 0;
}

> g++ t.cpp
> ./a.out
12
13
x = -1.083333
> ./a.out
13
12
x = -0.923077

PS. Learn to write nice code.
The above is horrible and nobody wants to read shoddy code like that.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you mean, that there are must be \n on strings with {? Thank you for answer. –  kill Jan 8 '11 at 9:16
    
@kill: No. You are using %f this is wrong. For double you need %lf (notice the extra l before the f). The %f is ONLY for float values (which is half the size of a double (usually). –  Loki Astari Jan 8 '11 at 23:25

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