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We are moving to SVN from VSS and are debating the project structure. We are debating two proposals displayed below.

No. 1 seems simpler for development support since a Project release version is tied to a tag and the developer would only need to perform an update on that tag to immediately get to work.

No. 2 insures that all Projects and Dependencies can be developed independently but building a particular release version means knowing the tags of the Project and all it's Dependencies.

Are there obvious comparative benefits between the two? Any gotchas in the two structures? or are there better structures out there?

1.
Development  
  + trunk  
    Project1  
    Project2  
    Dependency1  
    Dependency2  
    Dependency3  
  + branches  
  + tags  

2.
Project1  
  + trunk  
  + branches  
  + tags  
Project2  
  + trunk  
  + branches  
  + tags  
Dependency1  
  + trunk  
  + branches  
  + tags  
Dependency2  
  + trunk  
  + branches  
  + tags  
Dependency3  
  + trunk  
  + branches  
  + tags  
share|improve this question
    
Thanks for the responses. For #2, how do we tie together the project version and the versions of it's Dependencies? In #1 at the point in time when the tag is created the project you are creating the tag for and it's Dependencies are assumed to be compatible. –  user481779 Jan 7 '11 at 20:10
    
For #2 you use svn:externals. Basically it's subdirectory in your project that's tied to a particular svn checkout. For #1 you run into issues when a dependency wants to get "out of sync" with one of the projects using it, or when the two (or more) projects can't coordinate on the same particular release of a dependency. –  Edwin Buck Jan 7 '11 at 21:20

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In general, I recommend having projects remain separate as much as makes sense (your second option). This will generally promote reuse. (If I only want Dependency2, I don't need to bring an entire other project in order to get to it.)

However, you have to be smart about what your dependencies are really going to be doing. For example, if Dependency2 is only going to be a dependency for Project1, then it should probably just exist within Project1's source structure. (Note: I do not mean have separate branches and tags for the Dependency - I mean have it be in a different package, or another subproject within Project1.)

If you want to make a project a reusable library within your organization, then have it as a separate project completely so you don't introduce unnecessary co-dependencies. And, I would encourage your development team not to check out a dependency and work alongside that. Instead, build the dependencies and use them as a binary library. This way, whoever checks out a Project to work on it will always have the latest library dependency that they need for the application. If an update is needed, then you can worry about checking out the Dependency and building it. (Or, even better, have a location where project teams can release the latest libraries as binary files.)

Update on Versioning of Project and Dependencies If you go with the #2 route, and have separate Project and Dependencies, your versioning actually becomes very simple. Here is an outline of how it might work.

  1. Team A is working on Project1.
  2. Team B is working on Dependency1 which Project1 depends on.
  3. Whenever Team B finishing their work, they build a release of Dependency1 (a binary - perhaps a DLL, or a library, or something along those lines). They can also tag their project at this time. The binary name may be: Dependency1-v1.0.0
  4. Team A takes the binary release of Dependency1-v1.0.0 and includes it in their project. (Typically, binaries are kept in a /lib folder or something like that within the project.)
  5. Whenever Team A finishes their work, they can release their project and tag their project as well.

Note that, at no point, does Team A check out the source code from Dependency1 and bring it into their project. This allows development of the two projects to remain separate so that there is autonomy between the development teams. Team A can use the binary for as long or as short as they like. If they want an updated version, they go get the latest release from Team B.

This process is not really much different from what you would do if you were using a library from an outside source. You have no control over how they version their library, so you just grab what you need for your project and update when you feel is necessary. You keep the binary within your own project structure so that you can always rely on it.

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Thanks alot JasCav. I added a comment to my post to understand the procedure of tying project and Dependency versions together. –  user481779 Jan 7 '11 at 20:13
    
@user481779 - Updated my answer. If this helps you out, please make sure you upvote or accept the answer. I noticed you have a low percentage right now (25%). You will get better answers if people know that you are going to reward them for it. –  JasCav Jan 7 '11 at 20:20

Go with #2:

Project1  
  + trunk  
  + branches  
  + tags  
Project2  
  + trunk  
  + branches  
  + tags  
Dependency1  
  + trunk  
  + branches  
  + tags  
Dependency2  
  + trunk  
  + branches  
  + tags  
Dependency3  
  + trunk  
  + branches  
  + tags  

With projects that must reference other projects, check out the section on "SVN Externals". This allows you to set a particular SVN revision of a dependency as the value used in another project.

share|improve this answer
    
I know I am late to the party...does this mean that you use SVnExternals inside e.g. Project1-Trunk-whatever to link to Dependency1-trunk-whaterver? –  BlueChippy Jan 17 '13 at 9:22
    
You have the idea for referencing other source code within your project; however, there are other solutions. Most IDE's have the ability to attach a source code distribution (usually zip) to a compiled JAR. You might want to just chop the two projects up and manage their inter-dependency with Maven or Ivy. After a bit of setup, it really delivers a lot more than just dependency management. It delivers a world of automation that does more, with less manpower. –  Edwin Buck Jan 17 '13 at 13:58
    
The main point of this post is that the "one repository per project" is favored over the "one repository containing dependencies" mainly because it allows you to reduce the scope of the build effort when monitoring the repository. A repository change trigger means build that project, and that doesn't build any projects that were not affected by the change. This means less testing (because testing will never retest a not changed but rebuilt library), less time in the compile, and better containment of future issues to smaller areas of code. –  Edwin Buck Jan 17 '13 at 14:04

I'd personally go with #2. We did that at my previous company and it worked very well. It isolated each project so you could easily just view its history with regards to branching and tagging without any additional effort. The ability to just check out a project and get all of its branches, tags, and trunk is a nice ability when tracking differences locally as well.

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Thanks alot Mark. I added a comment to my post to understand the procedure of tying project and Dependency versions together. –  user481779 Jan 7 '11 at 20:13

Thank you to everyone for helping me understand this so much better!

@JasCav, I especially thank you for your explanation of how to think about how "dependent" a particular dependency is. I have both, so I think the structure implied would be:

Project1  
  + trunk  
       SubPrjFor_Prj1
       LibraryExternalRefs
           Dependency1_DLLOnly
           Dependency2_DLLOnly
           Dependency3_DLLOnly_NOT_SHARED_UsedOnlyByPrj1_ONLY_HERE
       LibraryWithSource
           Dependency4_UsedOnlyByPrj1_NOT_SHARED
                Source_SubFolder1
                Source_SubFolder2
  + branches  
  + tags  
Project2  
  + trunk  
       SubPrjFor_Prj2
       LibExternalRefs
           Dependency1_DLLOnly
  + branches  
  + tags  
Dependency1_UsedByBothPrj1Prj2  
  + trunk  
           Dependency1_DLLOnly
  + branches  
  + tags  
Dependency2_UsedByPrj1SoFar  
  + trunk  
           Dependency2_Source_SubPrj1
           Dependency2_Source_SubPrj2
  + branches  
  + tags  

Of course, I have elided the matching structures for the trunk/branches.

ps @JasCav, I apologize for not voting you up nor putting this item under your comment; I apparently don't have points to do those things, which does not make much sense to me. I thought logging in would enable me to comment and thus track Stackoverflow items of interest, but I guess not.

Edit: fixed formatting and expanded example to 4 dependencies.

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Instead of keeping just one repository, as all these structures suggest, on another post here, VSS to SVN - Repositories , the users suggest having one repository per team. That way the SVN revision number will increment only upon commits made by an individual team.

Have any of you tried that method? Is there extra overhead work involved?

I would like to keep the codebase clean with the minimum amount of SVN administration work, as in my case I will likely be doing it :).

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If all the Projects are part of the same Solution or product, then I would go with approach #1.

I use the following structure:

TRUNK
--Build
--Product
----Source
------Project1
------Project2
------Project3
----Test
--ThirdParty

The ThirdParty directory is for non-source code dependencies such as libraries or APIs.

My guidance is rooted in a new developer being able to get latest from the Trunk and getting everything (and I mean everything) they need to immediately build the product. Chasing down references is a big waste of time that can be easily avoided.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Derek. Our Projects are unrelated to other except through there dependence on shared libs. –  user481779 Jan 7 '11 at 20:11

My experience is it's just a matter of convention. And the SVN Book does not have a problem with either.

In one of the projects, the team was using ANT build and was more emphasis flat structure. We were having approach #2. With one master build-script. It was alright when I was working on that and we were having no problem.

The current project involves Maven build, so over code is by default has #1 structure with one parent and under that, dependencies and modular projects. In SVN, we follow approach #1. But, if an entirely new project is going to start, we will have mix of #1 and #2 in over layout. Something like this:

    Project1
        trunk
            project1A
            project1B
            dependency1C
            dependency1D
        branches
        tags
    Project2
        trunk
            project2A
            dependency2B
        branches
        tags

To summaries, I would like to keep my repository logically separate. So, to answer your question -- I would prefer approach #2.

Edit#1: the SVN-Book URL is fixed

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1  
@downvoter please explain. This is a question about convention -- there can't be a right or wrong answer. There is no point in down-voting. –  Nishant Jan 8 '11 at 7:33

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