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Hey there guys. I was hoping someone would be able to help me figure out how to increment enumeration. I have a game that uses enumeration to get the points for killing an enemy, I want the value of the enemy to increment by 10 every time one of the enemies is killed. Here is the code I have for the enumeration:

  public enum gamescore// Enumeration to hold the score values of the enemies

  {

  Martian = 10,

  Vesuvian = 20,

  Mercurian = 30,

  Meteor = 50,

  MotherShip = 100,

  Destroyer = 200

  }

and the method to get the score called from another class when an enemy dies:

    public int GetScore()// The method that utilieses the enumeration to get the score for the enemy killed
    {

        if (this is Martian)
        {
            return (int)gamescore.Martian;
        }
        else if (this is Vesuvian)
        {
            return (int)gamescore.Vesuvian;
        }
        else if (this is Mercurian)
        {
            return (int)gamescore.Mercurian;
        }
        else if (this is Destroyer)
        {
            return (int)gamescore.Destroyer;
        }
        else if (this is Meteor)
        {
            return (int)gamescore.Meteor;
        }
        else if (this is Mothership)
        {
            return (int)gamescore.MotherShip;
        }
        return 0;
    }

Any suggestions? I can only come up with complicated ways to do this, that I don't think even works.

Also I was wondering, I have a highscore label that is updated if it is less than score, so highscore becomes score, but when the application restarts, if the game is completed or if the player runs out of lives, the highscore resets back to zero, is there any way to keep the highscore value in there so the highest score is always there?

I appreciate all your help with my questions guys, I really do.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
You have two questions here, please separate them into two actual questions. –  sgriffinusa Jan 7 '11 at 20:00
2  
Regarding #1: Polymorphism. Period. –  delnan Jan 7 '11 at 20:01
1  
What do you mean by: "I want the value of the enemy to increment by 10 every time one of the enemies is killed"? –  Mikael Svenson Jan 7 '11 at 20:01

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This design is not very Object Oriented. A better approach would be to have an IEnemy interface. That interface would require a method of GetScore (presumably among others). That method could then return the value of the enemy. Then you have a separate class for each of your enemies that implements the IEnemy interface.

public interface IEnemy{
   int GetScore();
}

public class Martian : IEnemy{
   int GetScore(){ return 10; }
}

public class Vesuvian : IEnemy{
   int GetScore(){ return 20; }
}
...

This has many benefits over using an enumeration, for example you can have enemies that have the same score but different other attributes.

share|improve this answer
    
That looks like a great idea, thank you I will try it and see if I can get it to work. Thanks! –  deucalion0 Jan 7 '11 at 20:12

In this case I wouldn't store it as an enum - it sounds more like range markers than discreet values. I might have some constants and a method that checks

if(score>100) return "awesome";
if(score>40) return "meh";

Etc

But to answer the question about incrementing an enum: you can cast it to the base-type (usually int):

myEnumValue = (MyEnum)((int)myEnumValue + 10);
share|improve this answer
    
I am not the best programmer, I am a beginner, I use enumeration to hold the score as its the only way I knew how, adn as the mothership and destroyer are boss enemies I want their calue to increase by ten points evrytime I kill them. –  deucalion0 Jan 7 '11 at 20:09
    
@user567371 - some const int might suffice for that... –  Marc Gravell Jan 7 '11 at 20:13

Why using enumeration? Why not either create interface IScorable, that has only property GetScore and implement it in your "Enemies" classes. Then you can test if your enemy is IScorable and if yes, read this property. Or if all your enemy classes derive from one, then put it in there.

Also The way you use Enumeration is wrong. Enumerations are intended for completly different purpouses.

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Sorry, I didn't mean to create two questions at once, I just didn't freel that they were both big questions if I knew how to separate them I would, apologies! –  deucalion0 Jan 7 '11 at 20:06
    
You put your comment in wrong textbox.. –  Euphoric Jan 7 '11 at 20:08
    
Sorry I was confused with everything coming up at once on the page. If I knew how to create it with an interface I would, I iwll look into it! –  deucalion0 Jan 7 '11 at 20:12

I would create an Abstract class called Enemy, with a property called KillScore (or whatever you like). Derive each of your enemy types from that:

public abstract class Enemy
{
    virtual public int KillScore
    {
        get { return 0; }
    }
}

public class Martian : Enemy
{
    public override int KillScore
    {
        get { return 10; }
    }
}

// All the other classes here

public class Destoyer : Enemy
{
    public override int KillScore
    {
        get { return 200; }
    }
}

You just instantiate your individual classes, for example:

    Martian martian = new Martian();
    Destoyer destroyer = new Destoyer();
    int score = GetScore(martian);
    score = GetScore(destroyer);

Then your GetScore function becomes very easy:

public int GetScore(Enemy enemy)
{
    // Debug Statement to show you what this enemy actually is
    Console.WriteLine("{0} {1}", enemy.GetType(), enemy.KillScore);
    return enemy.KillScore;
}

(An interface would work as well, but this gives you some control over default values, allows you to do some common functionality in the base class that may or may not be overridden in the child classes, etc.).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks so much for your help with this, you have given me a great clue as to how to tackle this, I already have the inheritance from an Abstract enemy class, I will try your idea with the getscore. Thank you! –  deucalion0 Jan 7 '11 at 20:14
1  
Haha, they are amazingly similar. Great minds think alike. Though user567371 should probably accept yours as you added the note about using an interface Vs an abstract class which helps explain it. –  Corith Malin Jan 7 '11 at 20:32
    
@Corith - great minds think alike, and so do we... –  Wonko the Sane Jan 7 '11 at 20:36

Probably your best bet would be to use Polymorphism. So you'd have a base class called enemy and it'd be abstract.

public abstract class Enemy
{
  public abstract int GetScore();
}

Then you'd inherit from it for each time.

public class Martian : Enemy
{
  public int GetScore() { return 10; }
}

public class Vesuvian : Enemy
{
  public int GetScore() { return 20; }
}

Then in your main method you just have to create the correct type of enemy:

Enemy blah = new Martian();
Enemy blah1 = new Vesuvian();

int x = blah.GetScore(); // This is 10.
int y = blah1.GetScore(); // This is 20.
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for answering almost exactly the same way at the same time as me... :) –  Wonko the Sane Jan 7 '11 at 20:16
    
HI, that makes sense, but how could get the destroyer and mothership to increase by 10 using your idea? Thank you! –  deucalion0 Jan 7 '11 at 20:16
    
They would be new classes. I just didn't include all of the classes for brevity. And rather than returning 10, you'd want to return your enum casted as an int. –  Corith Malin Jan 7 '11 at 20:25

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