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I am pretty sure I know what the issue is, but I cannot resolve it for the life of me and I just don't know what to do at this point.

All I am trying to do is qualify the input of a first and last name field. This code IS working on my local server running php5:

    <?php 
$regex = "John's Jerod";
 if (!preg_match("/^[A-Za-z\'\,\.\s]+$/", $regex)) {
          echo "ERROR!";
      } else {
   echo "NO ERROR!";
   }
?>

As expected, this returns NO ERROR!, but when I run this on my live server, I only get ERROR with the same data.

I've determined it's the comma throwing it off! And I am pretty sure, because the php version I am running does an auto escape like \' in the name John\'s, so I ran striptags on all output and still the same error.

DOes anyone know what I am doing wrong or how I can resolve this?

I've got about 8 hours in the "bug" as of now. Been through 40+ variations of the RegEex with no luck.

I check and triple checked all of my form field names, vars etc to ensure everything matcheds and all else is OK.

SOS

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1  
Are the servers' OS's and PHP versions the same or similar? It could be line endings if you are doing this from Windows to Linux/Mac. –  Blender Jan 7 '11 at 20:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your regex doesn't need all those backslashes. It should be this:

"/^[A-Za-z',\.\s]+$/"

Also, you refer to using striptags(). You should be using stripslashes() if your server has magic quotes enabled.

[Edited regex]

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Nope. That does not work either. And it was my error. I am using stripslashes() like: $first_name = stripslashes(mysql_real_escape_string($_POST['fname'])); –  OldWest Jan 7 '11 at 20:30
    
David Powers, I think you posted the exact expression I did? Did you mean something else? –  OldWest Jan 7 '11 at 20:32
    
@David Powers, You posted the exact same expression the OP did >.> –  Qix Jan 7 '11 at 20:34
    
How weird. The regex that I entered did not have backslashes in front of the single quote or the comma, but it looks as though it has been added in by the system. –  David Powers Jan 7 '11 at 20:35
    
@OldWest, I think your problem is caused by passing the value to mysql_real_escape_string(), which is escaping the apostrophe ready to insert the value into the database. Try preg_match() before passing it to mysql_real_escape_string(). –  David Powers Jan 7 '11 at 20:37

Try checking specifically for 1. Per the documentation, it returns FALSE (strict check) on error, 0 (strict check) for no matches, or 1 if there is a match (since it stops at one).

Also, per my own preference, I use the ~ symbol for my regex's. And like David Powers said (only he didn't correct it at all), you don't need most of those backslashes (only for the period and the space).

<?php 
$regex = "John's Jerod";
 if (preg_match("~^[A-Za-z',\.\s]+$~", $regex) !== 1) {
          echo "ERROR!";
      } else {
   echo "NO ERROR!";
   }
?>

Hope this helps!

EDIT: Also, you say you're using strip_tags? That strips any HTML tags in a string -- not slashes. You need strip_slashes to strip slashes, not strip_tags ;)

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i did have a similar problem, but finally i figure out that my server has a diferent cultere settings i mind lenguaje, and country configurations, i set up like my test server and everything work out

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If you want to give suggestions that do not directly solve the question, please do this by posting a comment instead. –  depa Mar 30 '13 at 22:30

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