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I am a little new to .net and trying to grasp a few concepts.

I have been writing in Coldfusion for a while, and in CF there is an event under the Application.cfc called onRequest() that fires each time there is a page.

What in .net is used to capture the request information?

And moreover is there a way to latch on or extend the Request event to fire off my own events?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You'll probably want something like OnActionExecuting which is called before the action is hit.

To access the current request you could do the following:

protected virtual void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext) {
  //Do the default OnActionExecuting first.
  base.OnActionExecuting(filterContext);

  //The request variable will allow you to see information on the current request.
  var request = filterContext.RequestContext.HttpRequest;
}

If you want to access this in every controller, then you should probably create a base controller and add this there.

public class BaseController : Controller
{
  //Code above
}

And in your Home controller:

public class HomeController : BaseController
{
}
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1  
No, if you want it in every controller you should use a global action filter. Composition > inheritance. –  Ryan Jan 9 '11 at 0:22
    
@Ryan - Do you read anything other than Gang of Four?! I'd argue that global action filters are overkill in plenty of circumstances. –  Dan Atkinson Jan 9 '11 at 20:20
    
I'm just speaking from personal experience. My advice is to try things different ways to figure out what works for you. –  Ryan Jan 10 '11 at 19:16

You can also find global.asax file and use one of events of HttpApplication class (for example BeginRequest):

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.web.httpapplication.aspx

HttpApplication has Request property.

You can catch every request there, not only related to Controller (images, css, wrong address).

public class MvcApplication : System.Web.HttpApplication
{
    protected void Application_BeginRequest(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {        
        //Request.Have_fun
    }    
}

If you don't want to write code in global.asax file, you should consider using HttpModule.

Create new class with this example code:

using System;
using System.Web;

namespace MyProject
{
    public class MyHttpModule : IHttpModule
    {
        public void Init(HttpApplication application)
        {
            application.BeginRequest += ApplicationBeginRequest;
            application.EndRequest += ApplicationEndRequest;
        }

        private void ApplicationEndRequest(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            //do something here with HttpContext.Current.Request
        }

        private static void ApplicationBeginRequest(Object source, EventArgs e)
        {
            //do something here with HttpContext.Current.Request
        }


        public void Dispose()
        {
        }
    }
}

Add two entries in web.config (registers HttpModule):

<system.web>
  <httpModules>
    <add name="MyHttpModule" type="MyProject.MyHttpModule" />
  </httpModules>
</system.web>
<system.webServer>
  <modules runAllManagedModulesForAllRequests="true">
    <add name="MyHttpModule" type="MyProject.MyHttpModule" />
  </modules>
</system.webserver>

Because of changes in IIS7(adding system.webServer section), you have to add two entries in web.config.

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LukLed would you mind elaborating a little on the HttpModule for me? –  jcreamer898 Jan 10 '11 at 20:12
    
@jcreamer898: I've added some code for creating HttpModule. You can also find many tutorials in google. –  LukLed Jan 11 '11 at 20:55
    
This is a pretty heavy handed approach for MVC. In ASP.NET MVC, OnActionExecuting or action filters as the other answers suggest are better approaches. –  Matt Greer Jan 11 '11 at 21:07
    
@Matt Greer: I wrote about is as an alternative, which can catch also other types of requests (not only related to controller). –  LukLed Jan 11 '11 at 21:10

If you are working in ASP.NET MVC 3 I would recommend using global action filters (use one per "event" you want to handle) instead of tapping directly into the ASP.NET Application/Request stack.

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