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I'd like to be able to declare a Java class Ref such that I could, elsewhere in code, do things like this:

switch (v)
{
case Ref.LicenseCode:                     ....;
case Ref.Widget.MaxWeight:                ....;
case Ref.Widget.MolyBolt.ThreadsPerInch:  ....;
}

Ref is intended to be constant data structure representing a hierarchical set of constant values, such as often appears in standards documents or other reference material. I want values that are truly constant (so they can be used in a case statement).

I thought I might be able to do this by nesting class definitions, and it works... to a point. For example this:

public final class Ref
{
    public final static int LicenseCode = 800;

    public final class Widget
    {
        public final static int MaxWeight = 5000;
    }
}

lets me write this:

switch (v)
{
case Ref.LicenseCode:                     ....;
case Ref.Widget.MaxWeight:                ....;
}

but when I try to nest down to the third level:

public final class Ref
{
    public final static int LicenseCode = 800;

    public final class Widget
    {
        public final static int MaxWeight = 5000;

        public final class MolyBolt
        {
            public final static int ThreadsPerInch = 12;
        }
    }
}

I am told that:

"Ref.Widget.MolyBolt cannot be resolved or is not a field."

Am I doing something wrong? Or have I bumped up against one of the edges of Java? Is there some other way to accomplish my goal? I am running under Windows Vista, JCK 1.6.0-21, using Eclipse Java Development Tools 3.5.2.r352.

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2  
MolyBolt isn't a field. It's a class. Did you mean "Ref.Widget.MolyBolt.ThreadsPerInch" ? –  rfeak Jan 7 '11 at 22:10
    
Sorry, the attempt was to reference Ref.Widget.MolyBolt.ThreadsPerInch, and the resulting error was "Ref.Widget.MolyBolt cannot be resolved or is not a field". –  vw-register Jan 7 '11 at 22:18
    
These oddball constants, LicenceCodes and Weights and such are just more-or-less random examples. I do have a tree in mind that makes more sense, but it's fairly confidential. A more real-world example might be a table of constant values about the solar system, including all of the planets and moons. If I could write: case Solar.Sun.Weight: ....; case Solar.Mars.Deimos.Weight: ....; then I could probably do everything I needed. –  vw-register Jan 7 '11 at 22:21
    
Odd, your example runs fine for me in IDEA. Have you tried to compile it without Eclipse? –  Denis Kniazhev Jan 7 '11 at 22:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

How are you referencing the ThreadsPerInch field? This works for me:

public final class Ref {
    public final static int LicenseCode = 800;
    public final class Widget {
        public final static int MaxWeight = 5000;
        public final class MolyBolt {
            public final static int ThreadsPerInch = 12;
        }
    }
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int v = Integer.valueOf(args[0]);
        switch (v) {
            case Ref.LicenseCode:
                break;
            case Ref.Widget.MaxWeight:
                break;
            case Ref.Widget.MolyBolt.ThreadsPerInch:
                break;
        }
    }
}

The only thing I'd change is to make inner classes static, though you're probably not going to instantiate any objects of this class anyway.

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I now have two responders telling me that they're not having any problems. I'll look into this... maybe I am having an Eclipse issue. I'll report back. –  vw-register Jan 7 '11 at 22:28
    
i would use abstract static. hell, use interface. –  irreputable Jan 7 '11 at 22:54
    
Thank you very much, you guys who told me it was working for you. As you might expect, I am working on a much bigger piece of code than the example I gave above. In fact I am trying to convert an existing large data structure which is NOT constant (not even immutable!) and I have been using the Eclipse to air-check possible solutions. The file is large and due to my experiments, there are a number of errors later in the file. It turns out that one of those errors was the underlying cause of my error message... when I cut out all the code that hadn't yet been updated, the problem was fixed. –  vw-register Jan 7 '11 at 23:02

Looks like bill of material information to me. Embedding this in Java classes as static data seems to be terribly rigid to me. It's far more natural to store it in a relational, hierarchical, object, or graph database.

The other problem is that the code to process this will be a spaghetti forest of if/then/else or switch statements to process.

It's hard to overstate just how wrong-headed this appears to be. You might get an answer that will allow you to proceed, but this can only end in grief.

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1  
This is going into an embedded product, and storing a constant, unchanging hierarchical data structure seems like the ideal solution if I can get it to work. I don't understand what code you think will be difficult to access; I'm simply talking about a data structure, and if you can suggest a clearer and more succinct way of looking up a constant value, I'm for it. –  vw-register Jan 7 '11 at 22:25
2  
Anything other than hard coded Java in a hierarchy of embedded classes will be better. Hell, storing it in an XML document and using XPath to search an in-memory DOM is likely to be better. Anything other than what you're proposing. –  duffymo Jan 7 '11 at 22:32
    
that's crazy talk. so if we write the same information in xml, instead of in java, in pretty much the same structure, suddenly it's better? for what? –  irreputable Jan 7 '11 at 22:53
1  
Yes, much better. If you write it in XML, you'll be able to read it, parse it, and store it in memory using a standard DOM tree. You'll have XPath available to you to query it. I think you're grossly underestimating the likelihood of change and the complexity of coding. The fact that I see "moly bolt" suggests to me that you might be a mechanical engineer who's been asked to implement something like a bill of materials solution. Is that close to the mark? –  duffymo Jan 7 '11 at 22:58
1  
@irreputable - not crazy at all. I'd rather have anything other than a Java hierarchy for data like this. That's what a host of data persistence technologies were invented for. I think it's likely that you and the OP are grossly underestimating the difficulties that this approach will cause over the next 6-18 months. –  duffymo Jan 7 '11 at 23:01

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