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I have a simple class:

template<size_t N, typename T>
class Int
{
    bool valid(size_t index) { return index >= N; }
    T t;
}

If I define an instance of this class as:

Int<0, Widget> zero;

I get a g++ warning:

warning: comparison is always true due to limited range of data type

I tried to do this, but I couldn't figure out how to partially specialize a function with a non-type template parameter. It looks like it might not be possible to disable this warning in g++. What is the proper way to either hide this warning, or to write this method such that it always returns true if N==0?

Thanks!

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looks like a gcc bug –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jan 7 '11 at 23:03
    
Do you need the full range of size_t, or could you go with a signed type? –  Bill Jan 7 '11 at 23:26
    
@Bill: Unfortunately I need the whole range :-( –  JaredC Jan 8 '11 at 0:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

So, I've come up with the following solution:

template<size_t N>
bool GreaterThanOrEqual(size_t index)
{
    return index >= N;
}

template<>
bool GreaterThanOrEqual<0l>(size_t index)
{
    return true;
}

So now, the class looks like:

template<size_t N, typename T>
class Int
{
    bool valid(size_t index) { return GreaterThanOrEqual<N>(index); }
    T t;
}

Of course, I get an unused parameter warning, but there are ways around that....

Is this a reasonable solution?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I'd say it is. –  villintehaspam Jan 7 '11 at 22:55

You can specialize int for N = 0.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried to do this, but I don't think you can partially specialize a function with a non-type template parameter. Do you know how to do this? –  JaredC Jan 7 '11 at 22:23
    
template <typename T> class Int<0, T> { ... } –  templatetypedef Jan 7 '11 at 22:33
    
Thanks. The class is actually more complicated then my simple example, so specializing the whole class isn't an option. Is there a way to only specialize the valid() function? –  JaredC Jan 7 '11 at 22:36
    
@JaredC: Unfortunately, no. –  Puppy Jan 7 '11 at 22:37

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