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I have a table of data and I want the user to be able to click a column header and send a non-AJAX request that reloads the page with the data sorted by that column.

I could just make the column title a link, but I want them to be able to click anywhere in the column header so I've added hidden forms and I'm trying to use jQuery to submit the form when the clicks the column header.

The problem I'm hitting is that although it works exactly as expected for the second col header -- a click submits the hidden form and reloads the page -- but does not work at all for the first col header -- the form does not get submitted.

  1. What is keeping the first column's form from being submitted?

  2. Is there a better way to do this than using a hidden form?


HTML:

        <th class='sortable'> 
          <form action='/procurements' class='sort_form' method='get'> 
            <input name='sort' type='hidden' value='title' /> 
          </form> 
          Title
          <img class='sort_indicator' src='/images/sort_unsorted.jpg' /> 
        </th> 
        <th class='sortable'> 
          <form action='/procurements' class='sort_form' method='get'> 
            <input name='sort' type='hidden' value='nature' /> 
          </form> 
          Procurement type
          <img class='sort_indicator' src='/images/sort_unsorted.jpg' /> 
        </th>

JS:

$(document).ready(function(){
  $('table.tgr_datagrid th.sortable').click(
    function() {
      $(this).children( 'form' ).submit();
    }
  );
});
share|improve this question
    
I agree with Marcus that a form is probably not necessary. Even more, you could probably accomplish the same thing (of whatever you're doing) with an AJAX request and not need to clear/refresh the whole page. –  vol7ron Jan 8 '11 at 1:22
    
Re: downvote. Please explain when downvoting. A downvote with no explanation is unhelpful. –  Ethan Jan 8 '11 at 16:58
    
@vol7ron: There are specific reasons why I'm not using an AJAX request here. AJAX is great for a lot of things, but it isn't the best solution in every situation. About the necessity/non-necessity of the form, agreed. So what would be your alternative suggestion? –  Ethan Jan 8 '11 at 17:03
    
@Ethan: If choosing non-AJAX, the only situation I think I could imagine is simplicity of security (passing/setting cookies), really everything can be done through AJAX. Since you're doing a whole page refresh, do similar to Marcus's solution, but don't use table, use div or span around whatever you're clicking. Basically, reduce the unnecessary HTML markup and only use what's necessary. Otherwise, you should be looking at using a datagrid, which makes it easy to produce sortable tables. –  vol7ron Jan 10 '11 at 0:17
    
@vol7ron Your suggestions are uninformed as to OP's situation. What we do know is that OP has a "table of data". A table is not merely being used to style the buttons, it is a table of data. However as you suggest table sorting is possible purely in jQuery without the need for a page refresh, but that is not the question. If you have down voted the question I would suggest that you reverse your vote, since your reasons against it are invalid. –  Marcus Whybrow Jan 11 '11 at 9:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you are just doing a GET request then don't bother using a form at all:

$('table.tgr_datagrid th.sortable').click(function() {
    window.location = '/procurements?sort=' + $(this).text();
});

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/marcuswhybrow/NL3km/

So in the context of your code you could have this, (note the custom data-sort-name attributes):

<table>
    <tr>
        <th class='sortable' data-sort-name="title">
            Title
            <img class='sort_indicator' src='/images/sort_unsorted.jpg' /> 
        </th> 
        <th class='sortable' data-sort-name="nature"> 
            Procurement type
            <img class='sort_indicator' src='/images/sort_unsorted.jpg' /> 
        </th>
    </tr>
</table>

jQuery:

$('th.sortable').click(function() {
    window.location = '/procurements?sort=' + $(this).attr('data-sort-name');
});
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Is that pretty reliable across different browsers? –  Ethan Jan 8 '11 at 0:09
    
I have added a DEMO which shows how you can do this in the way I have suggested. –  Marcus Whybrow Jan 8 '11 at 0:16
    
Thanks for the sample. Yeah, alert() was already working with all of the col headers no problem. It was just form submission that was failing on the first column. –  Ethan Jan 8 '11 at 0:23
    
I'll try window.location. Maybe that will work. –  Ethan Jan 8 '11 at 0:25
    
@Ethan My answer (and example) is arguing against the use of forms. I made a mistake in my answer however, I have changed the last block of code to use window.location and not alert in the click binding. This will give you the refresh effect. –  Marcus Whybrow Jan 8 '11 at 0:28

You may need to use .each() around the .click(), otherwise you'll only be issuing the click on the last element of the array/object returned (as you've noticed).

$(document).ready(function(){
   $('table.tgr_datagrid th.sortable').each(function(){ 
      $(this).click(function() { $(this).children('form').submit(); });
   });
});

Other Thoughts:

  • There are many other ways you can do this, the question is why are you doing it the way you are and why do you want to do it that way?
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I'm not sure you understand what I'm trying to do. I'm trying to add separate individual onclick handlers to the th elements. –  Ethan Jan 8 '11 at 0:20

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