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I can't really formulate it properly, better with example.

XML:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<foo>
    <bar id="someId" class="someClass"/>
    <buz class="someClass" id="someId"/>
    <ololo class="someClass"/>
    <test id="someId"/>
</foo>

XSLT:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
<xsl:output method="text"/>
<xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

<xsl:template match="/*/*">
    <xsl:value-of select="@id | @class"/><xsl:text>&#xa;</xsl:text>
</xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

The result:

someId
someClass
someClass
someId

What I need

I need that "priority" of attributes remained as stated in my xpath expression.

So, if we call @id | @class an expression with two operands, I need that the attributes would be taken not in a document order, but in the order of how two operands were specified in the expression.

So, the result should be:

someId
someId
someClass
someId

@class should be taken only if @id is not present.

I know, that it can be done with conditional logic, but I'm really interested in a short solution, because it's common and used as attribute value template.

It might be obvious and I am missing The Elegant One.

Do note that I'm speaking in terms of XPath 1.0.

share|improve this question
    
Good question, +1. See my answer for a complete and very short XPath 1.0 one-liner. :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Jan 8 '11 at 3:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use:

@id | @class[not(../@id)]

This XPath expression selects always one node: @id if it exists, and only if @id doesn't exist then @class.

So this transformation:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:output method="text"/>

 <xsl:template match="foo/*">
  <xsl:value-of select="@id | @class[not(../@id)]"/>
  <xsl:text>&#xA;</xsl:text>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when applied on the provided XML document:

<foo>
    <bar id="someId" class="someClass"/>
    <buz class="someClass" id="someId"/>
    <ololo class="someClass"/>
    <test id="someId"/>
</foo>

produces the wanted, correct results:

someId
someId
someClass
someId
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it was rather obvious. I need to stop working at 4a.m. Still, the real life problems are usually more complicated, so there can be more conditions and the solution seems to have predicates for each of them. Any hack you can think of to simplify this? –  Flack Jan 8 '11 at 3:13
    
@Flack: To quote Einstein: "Make it as simple as possible, but not simpler" :) This is the minimal XPath expression that implements the necessary logic. And it is very short, indeed. Just compare it with node-set membership or with Muenchian grouping. –  Dimitre Novatchev Jan 8 '11 at 3:19
    
@Dimitre. I understand this and answer is totally sufficient. I just thought of cases like @id | @class[not(../@id)] | @foo[not(../@id or ../@class)]. It's synthetic, of course, so there can be no point for discussion. I just thought where can be something more DRY. –  Flack Jan 8 '11 at 3:27
    
@Flack: There is no simpler way to express sequencing in a language with no sequence/list data type. There could be some tricks using <xsl:sort> but what you wanted was XPath. Also, using <xsl:sort> is definitely much longer than the union of mutually exclusive node selections. –  Dimitre Novatchev Jan 8 '11 at 3:40
    
@Dimitre, understood. Thanks for the answer. –  Flack Jan 8 '11 at 3:45

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