Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I'm working on creating a very simple C program that just preforms shell commands. This is what I have so far:

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
char input[30];
fputs("$ ", stdout);
fflush(stdout);
fgets(input, sizeof input, stdin);
system(input);
}

It works, but only for one command. For example if I compile and type ./cmd I get the $ prompt. If I type ls I get what I'm supposed to get. But then it exits and goes back to the regular system shell. How can I make it so after the user types a command it goes back to the "$" input.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

What you're looking for are loops; if you want to have the exit condition determined by the user input, actually you probably need to have an infinite loop (the idiomatic way is for(;;)) and an if after the input acquisition that results in a break if your condition is satisfied.

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    char input[30];
    for(;;) /* infinite loop */
    {
        fputs("$ ", stdout);
        fflush(stdout);
        fgets(input, sizeof input, stdin);
        if(/* put here your exit condition */)
            break; /* breaks out of the loop */
        system(input);
    }
    return 0;
}

Your exit condition will probably involve using strcmp (from <string.h>) to perform the comparison between the string entered by the user and your exit command.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks works pretty well actually. What would i put in the exit condition to make the shell exit if the user types "exit"? –  AustinM Jan 8 '11 at 0:42
    
It was left as an exercise to the reader, but since all other answers already stated it... it should be strcmp(input, "exit\n")==0; have a look at the strcmp documentation to understand how this works. –  Matteo Italia Jan 8 '11 at 0:47
    
I would argue that the idiomatic way for this is a do-while loop. –  SiegeX Jan 8 '11 at 1:48
    
@SiegeX: No, because the condition is almost surely in the middle of the loop body, not at the end. This is why do-while is rarely useful... :-( –  R.. Jan 8 '11 at 2:07
    
@SiegeX: some people use while(1) for infinite loops, but this may trigger warnings in several compilers when you have a high warning level ("constant expression in conditional"), so for(;;) is usually preferred. –  Matteo Italia Jan 8 '11 at 15:17

You need to place your code inside a loop. For example:

int main()
{
    while (1) {
        char input[30];
        fputs("$ ", stdout);    
        fflush(stdout);
        fgets(input, sizeof input, stdin);
        system(input);
    }
}

The while (1) { ... } is an infinite loop. The only way to exit this would be to kill your program in some way. To be able to exit the loop with a command, you'll need to put some kind of condition inside it:

    while (1) {
        char input[30];
        fputs("$ ", stdout);    
        fflush(stdout);
        fgets(input, sizeof input, stdin);
        if (strcmp(input, "exit") == 0) {
            break;
        }
        system(input);
    }

The strcmp() does a compare to see if you typed "exit". If so, then the break statement exits the nearest loop, and your program ends.

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't work. Spits out an error saying true isn't defined. –  AustinM Jan 8 '11 at 0:37
    
Fixed that. You must be using a pretty old C. –  Greg Hewgill Jan 8 '11 at 0:38
    
@AustinM: in C89 bool, true and false aren't defined (and in C99 too if you don't include stdbool.h); put 1 instead of true or use for(;;) instead of while(true). –  Matteo Italia Jan 8 '11 at 0:39

You don't want just any loop, you want a do while loop because you always want to perform the system() command at least once. Also, by having the keyword exit be your break condition, there is no need for extra code to check input before you call system() because exit will kill both your shell and your program if you use strcmp() as the do-while conditional statement.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(void)
{
  char input[30];
  do {
    fputs("$ ", stdout);
    fflush(stdout);
    fgets(input, sizeof input, stdin);
    system(input);
  } while(strcmp(input,"exit\n"));

  return 0;
}

Output

[siegex@localhost]$ ./myshell
$ echo foo
foo
$ echo bar | sed 's/r/z/'
baz
$ exit
[siegex@localhost]$
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.