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I wrote a method like this:

using AttrDict = System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary<string, object>;
using IAttrDict = System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<System.Collections.Generic.KeyValuePair<string, object>>;

static string HtmlTag(string tagName, string content = null, IAttrDict attrs = null)
{
    var sb = new StringBuilder("<");
    sb.Append(tagName);
    if(attrs != null)
        foreach (var attr in attrs)
            sb.AppendFormat(" {0}=\"{1}\"", attr.Key, attr.Value.ToString().EscapeQuotes());
    if (content != null) sb.AppendFormat(">{0}</{1}>", content, tagName);
    else sb.Append(" />");
    return sb.ToString();
}

Which you can call like

HtmlTag("div", "hello world", new AttrDict{{"class","green"}});

Not too bad. But what if I wanted to allow users to pass an anonymous type in place of the dict? Like

HtmlTag("div", "hello world", new {@class="green"});

Even better! I could write the overload easily, but the problem is I'm going to have about 50 functions like this, I don't want to overload each one of them. I was hoping I could just write an implicit cast to do the work for me...

public class AttrDict : Dictionary<string, object>
{
    public static implicit operator AttrDict(object obj)
    {
        // conversion from anonymous type to AttrDict here
    }
}

But C# simply won't allow it:

user-defined conversions to or from a base class are not allowed

So what can I do?

share|improve this question
    
use reflection to query what members and values are set on your anonymous object –  Pauli Østerø Jan 8 '11 at 2:04
    
@Pauli: Yes, I know how to do that bit, the question was about how to accept either type (anonymous, or a dict). –  Mark Jan 8 '11 at 3:08
    
ah... yeah, for that you have to use the lowest common denominator (object), which already has been mentioned :) –  Pauli Østerø Jan 8 '11 at 3:11
    
@Pauli: Yeah..was hoping I could just type-cast it though instead of accepting a generic object so it's more clear about what data type is accepted. –  Mark Jan 8 '11 at 3:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can't do what you want directly. Like the ASP.NET MVC helper methods, you should probably go the other way. attrs should just be of type object. Then within the body of the method, you can handle it as either an anonymous type or a dictionary depending on its runtime type.

share|improve this answer
    
Heh... I guess everything will get filtered through that HtmlTag function anyway, so..yeah, this should work. Silly me. –  Mark Jan 8 '11 at 2:03

You can create an extension-method that uses reflection to do the conversion you want. This would look something like:

public static class AttrDictX
{
    public static AttrDict ToAttrDict(this object obj)
    {
        if (obj == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("obj");

        var ans = new AttrDict();

        foreach (var prop in obj.GetType().GetProperties())
        {
            if (prop.CanRead)
                ans.Add(prop.Name, prop.GetValue(obj, null));
        }

        return ans;
    }
}

Then the call-site will either:

  1. Contain a .ToAttrDict() call.
  2. (or) Look unchanged if you can provide an overload to the HtmlTag method that takes an object instead and does the conversion internally.

The second option is particularly desirable if you don't like extensions on object, which some people (not me) consider bad practice.

share|improve this answer

My Solution

static string EscapeQuotes(this string str)
{
    return str.Replace("\"", "\\\"");
}

static IAttrDict ToDictionary(this object obj)
{
    return obj.GetType().GetProperties().Where(prop => prop.CanRead).ToDictionary(prop => prop.Name, prop => prop.GetValue(obj, null));
}

static string HtmlTag(string tagName, string content = null, object attrs = null)
{
    IAttrDict attrDict = attrs != null ? attrs is IAttrDict ? (IAttrDict)attrs : attrs.ToDictionary() : null;

    var sb = new StringBuilder("<");
    sb.Append(tagName);
    if(attrDict != null)
        foreach (var attr in attrDict)
            sb.AppendFormat(" {0}=\"{1}\"", attr.Key, attr.Value.ToString().EscapeQuotes());
    if (content != null) sb.AppendFormat(">{0}</{1}>", content, tagName);
    else sb.Append(" />");
    return sb.ToString();
}
share|improve this answer
    
The only reason I didn't do it your way (LINQ) is that you had subclassed Dictionary<,> to create AttrDict; and I expected that you wanted the output to be of that type. –  Ani Jan 8 '11 at 2:24
    
@Ani: I was only trying to subclass it so that I could add an implicit operator -- it won't let me add an operator on a type I didn't define. –  Mark Jan 8 '11 at 3:06

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