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unless (place =~ /^\./) == 0

I know the unless is like if not but what about the condtional?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

It checks if the string place starts with a period ..

Consider this:

p ('.foo' =~ /^\./) == 0 # => true
p ('foo' =~ /^\./) == 0 # => false

In this case, it wouldn't be necessary to use == 0. place =~ /^\./ would suffice as a condition:

p '.foo' =~ /^\./ # => 0 # 0 evaluates to true in Ruby conditions
p 'foo' =~ /^\./ # => nil

EDIT: /^\./ is a regular expression. The start and end slashes denotes that it is a regular expression, leaving the important bit to ^\.. The first character, ^ marks "start of string/line" and \. is the literal character ., as the dot character is normally considered a special character in regular expressions.

To read more about regular expressions, see Wikipedia or the excellent regular-expressions.info website.

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How does it do that ...what does =~ /^\./ mean –  Trace Jan 8 '11 at 5:32
    
    
=~ is for regular expression matching....^ means start of string...and \. is for the period (which is a special character, hence has to be escaped)....the expression is enclosed within /<exp>/ –  st0le Jan 8 '11 at 5:36
    
@Matt See my edit. –  vonconrad Jan 8 '11 at 5:37
8  
It's not necessary to use a regexp at all. place.start_with? '.' is perfectly sufficient. –  Chuck Jan 8 '11 at 5:40

=~ means matches regex

/^\./ is a regular expression:

/.../ are the delimiters for the regex

^ matches the start of the string or of a line (\A matches the start of the string only)

\. matches a literal .

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1  
^ matches the start of a line or a string. \A matches the start of a string. –  Zabba Jan 8 '11 at 8:15
    
Thanks Zabba, I did not know that. –  richo Jan 8 '11 at 9:35

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