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I'm trying to chain a series of .bat files using the EXIT /B X command to return success or failure and && and || for conditional running of the next .bat (e.g. a.bat && b.bat).

Regardless of whether I call EXIT /B 0 or anything else to end a.bat, a.bat && b.bat will call b.bat afterward. My understanding is that EXIT /B 0 should set ERRORLEVEL=0, which is success, so the && should continue. The counterpoint to this is that calling EXIT /B 1 should set ERRORLEVEL=1 which is failure, so the && should stop. What am I missing here?

Trivialized example:

For non-batch commands, acting as expected

C:\>echo test|findstr test>NUL && echo yes
yes

C:\>echo test|findstr test>NUL || echo yes

C:\>echo test|findstr nope>NUL && echo yes

C:\>echo test|findstr nope>NUL || echo yes
yes

C:\>

Using EXIT /B always sees a.bat as successful

C:\>echo @EXIT /B 0 > a.bat

C:\>a.bat && echo yes
yes

C:\>a.bat || echo yes

C:\>echo @EXIT /B 1 > a.bat

C:\>a.bat && echo yes
yes

C:\>a.bat || echo yes

C:\>

How can I exit from a.bat so that a.bat && b.bat and a.bat || b.bat behave as expected?

All commands are run in cmd.exe on Windows XP SP3.

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I have never seen those operators used in batch files before. I don't think you're doing what you think you're doing. Edit: and I can't find any documentation about it, so I'm surprised you haven't seen any syntax errors. –  Mike Caron Jan 8 '11 at 7:27
2  
The usage of these operators is detailed here: microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/… –  Jordan Evens Jan 8 '11 at 7:49
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3 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

If you ask me, exit codes in batch files are broken for this exact reason, but there is a hacky workaround you can use. As the last line of your batch file, use:

@%COMSPEC% /C exit 1 >nul

Since this is an actual process that is started you get a real process exit code and && and || will work.

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1  
Although it's a bit weird to use this for exiting, it provides the expected behaviour when other things call the batch so it makes the most sense to use this instead of modifying everything else to use calls. –  Jordan Evens Jan 9 '11 at 0:01
3  
I was confused for a bit, so this is just a note for others that you literally need that to be the last line of the file. It won't actually exit the batch, just set the error code. Calling EXIT /B %ERRORLEVEL% directly after it doesn't always seem to work either. The only reliable method I found was to use IF ERRORLEVEL 1 goto :end and have a label :end just before the last line with %COMSPEC% /C EXIT %ERRORLEVEL%>NUL –  Jordan Evens Jan 10 '11 at 14:34
    
Could this issue be related to a problem I encountered recently? –  user66001 Jan 19 '13 at 21:16
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It works as it should when using call to execute batch scripts containing an exit statement:

C:\>echo @EXIT /B 1 > a.bat

C:\>call a.bat && echo yes

C:\>call a.bat || echo yes
yes

C:\>

By the way, it says wrongly on http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/call.mspx?mfr=true :

Call has no effect at the command-line when used outside of a script or batch file

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1  
While this works, adding call's like that is a pain –  Anders Jan 8 '11 at 22:11
1  
Call has also an effect for this: set var=%%var%%<enter>call call call echo %var% –  jeb Jan 8 '11 at 23:31
    
@jeb very disturbing... –  marapet Jan 10 '11 at 19:01
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If you use start /wait you can also use this in a very simple Win app called by dos batch files like so

static class Program
{
    [STAThread]
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Environment.ExitCode =Convert.ToInt32(args[0]);
    }
}

then the app can be called by your dos batch file and evaluate the result. i.e.

c:> start /wait SetRC 1
c:> if "%errorlevel%"=="1" goto abort

NOTE: the /wait is not necessary in a batch file

You could pass in the return code you want as an argument to your program.cs and get it out this way guaranteed.

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