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I have a windows forms app with a textbox control that I want to only accept integer values. In the past I've done this kind of validation by overloading the KeyPress event and just removing characters which didn't fit the specification. I've looked at the MaskedTextBox control but I'd like a more general solution that could work with perhaps a regular expression, or depend on the values of other controls.

Ideally this would behave such that pressing a non numeric character would either produce no result or immediately provide the user with feedback about the invalid character.

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9  
numbers or digits? big difference: even integers can go negative –  Joel Coehoorn Jan 20 '09 at 21:59
6  
The question was intended for numbers including the entire set of rational numbers. –  Mykroft Jun 7 '09 at 23:01

23 Answers 23

up vote 289 down vote accepted

Two options:

  1. Use a NumericUpDown instead. NumericUpDown does the filtering for you, which is nice. Of course it also gives your users the ability to hit the up and down arrows on the keyboard to increment and decrement the current value.

  2. Handle the appropriate keyboard events to prevent anything but numeric input. I've had success with this two event handlers on a standard TextBox:

    private void textBox1_KeyPress(object sender, KeyPressEventArgs e)
    {
        if (!char.IsControl(e.KeyChar) 
            && !char.IsDigit(e.KeyChar) 
            && e.KeyChar != '.')
        {
            e.Handled = true;
        }
    
        // only allow one decimal point
        if (e.KeyChar == '.' 
            && (sender as TextBox).Text.IndexOf('.') > -1)
        {
            e.Handled = true;
        }
    }
    

You can remove the check for '.' (and the subsequent check for more than one '.') if your TextBox shouldn't allow decimal places. You could also add a check for '-' if your TextBox should allow negative values.

If you want to limit the user for number of digit, use: textBox1.MaxLength = 2; // this will allow the user to enter only 2 digits

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1  
I'd forgotten the numeric up down control exists. It's actually what I should be using here instead of a textbox. In the future when I have more complicated validation I'll used the handled property with the KeyPress event. –  Mykroft Jan 20 '09 at 22:11
2  
The only drawback with NumericUpDown is that it provides no feedback when you enter a value outside of the Maximum or Minimum allowed values - it just changes what you've typed. A TextBox can at least allow invalid values so you can warn the user when they submit the form. –  Matt Hamilton Jan 20 '09 at 22:12
3  
That's true - the user could always paste in some non-numeric characters. You would hope that the form validation would catch that though, since at some point you're gonna want to do an Int32.TryParse or something. –  Matt Hamilton Jan 20 '09 at 22:41
20  
You'll need some addition effort to globalize this by replacing checks for '.' with checks on CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.NumberFormat.NumberDecimalSeparator. –  Jeff Yates Apr 16 '09 at 18:08
3  
@HamishGrubijan, IsControl has nothing to do with the Control key; it returns whether or not a char is a control char. By allowing control chars, you don't break things like backspace, delete or the arrow keys –  Thomas Levesque Oct 31 '11 at 2:22

And just because it's always more fun to do stuff in one line...

 private void textBox1_KeyPress(object sender, KeyPressEventArgs e)
    {
        e.Handled = !char.IsDigit(e.KeyChar) && !char.IsControl(e.KeyChar);
    }

NOTE: This DOES NOT prevent a user from Copy / Paste into this textbox. It's not a fail safe way to sanitize your data.

share|improve this answer
    
this is not a general solutions as it works only for intergers. I had to implement such thing recently and i ended up with try-parsing resulting string to number and allowing input only if parsing succeeded –  grzegorz_p Jan 4 '12 at 15:03
    
This may not work when multiple methods handle KeyPress events from the same text box. One event might set e.Handled to true, and then another could set it back to false. In general, it's better to use if (...) e.Handled = true; –  Nathaniel Jones May 27 at 16:55

I am assuming from context and the tags you used that you are writing a .NET C# app. In this case, you can subscribe to the text changed event, and validate each key stroke.

    private void textBox1_TextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex.IsMatch("[^0-9]", textBox1.Text))
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Please enter only numbers.");
            textBox1.Text.Remove(textBox1.Text.Length - 1);
        }
    }
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5  
Isn't that going to give a very weird effect if you type into the middle of a number? –  Colin Pickard Oct 25 '10 at 19:14
2  
and also it should be: textBox1.Text = textBox1.Text.Remove(textBox1.Text.Length - 1); –  Pieniadz Aug 24 '11 at 9:59
2  
what if the first character itself is not a digit...wouldn't subtracting 1 in that case throw an error.... –  newbie Mar 26 '12 at 8:29
2  
Also, using TextChanged instead of KeyPress creates a bit of recursion in that the code will jump into a second TextChanged event after the Remove method. –  WEFX May 21 '13 at 14:29
2  
You switched input and pattern parameters for your IsMatch function. Input should be first, then pattern. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/sdx2bds0(v=vs.110).aspx –  Mibou Feb 17 at 9:52

You Can use TextChanged Event :)

private void textBox_BiggerThan_TextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            long a;
            if (! long.TryParse(textBox_BiggerThan.Text, out a))
            {
           // If Not Integer Clear Textbox text or you can also Undo() Last Operation :)

                textBox_LessThan.Clear();
            }
        }

:)

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Here is a simple standalone Winforms custom control, derived from the standard TextBox, that allows only System.Int32 input (it could be easily adapted for other types such as System.Int64, etc.). It supports copy/paste operations and negative numbers:

public class Int32TextBox : TextBox
{
    protected override void OnKeyPress(KeyPressEventArgs e)
    {
        base.OnKeyPress(e);

        NumberFormatInfo fi = CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.NumberFormat;

        string c = e.KeyChar.ToString();
        if (char.IsDigit(c, 0))
            return;

        if ((SelectionStart == 0) && (c.Equals(fi.NegativeSign)))
            return;

        // copy/paste
        if ((((int)e.KeyChar == 22) || ((int)e.KeyChar == 3))
            && ((ModifierKeys & Keys.Control) == Keys.Control))
            return;

        if (e.KeyChar == '\b')
            return;

        e.Handled = true;
    }

    protected override void WndProc(ref System.Windows.Forms.Message m)
    {
        const int WM_PASTE = 0x0302;
        if (m.Msg == WM_PASTE)
        {
            string text = Clipboard.GetText();
            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(text))
                return;

            if ((text.IndexOf('+') >= 0) && (SelectionStart != 0))
                return;

            int i;
            if (!int.TryParse(text, out i)) // change this for other integer types
                return;

            if ((i < 0) && (SelectionStart != 0))
                return;
        }
        base.WndProc(ref m);
    }
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Try a MaskedTextBox. It takes a simple mask format so you can limit the input to numbers or dates or whatever.

share|improve this answer
    
I specifically do not want to use a MaskedTextBox. The formats they allow can be very limiting. They work for this case but I'd like to do something more general. –  Mykroft Jan 20 '09 at 22:03
    
Sorry - didn't read your question properly :] –  Andrew Kennan Jan 20 '09 at 22:04

I have made something for this on CodePlex.

It works by intercepting the TextChanged event. If the result is a good number it will be stored. If it is something wrong, the last good value will be restored. The source is a bit too large to publish here, but here is a link to the class that handles the core of this logic.

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This is exactly what the Validated/Validating events were designed for.

Here's the MSDN article on the topic: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.windows.forms.control.validating.aspx

The TL;DR version: check the .Text property in the Validating event and set e.Cancel=True when the data is invalid.

When you set e.Cancel=True, the user can't leave the field, but you will need to give them some kind of feedback that something's wrong. I change the box's background color to light red to indicate a problem. Make sure to set it back to SystemColors.Window when Validating is called with a good value.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for mentioning a very API-idiomatic approach. I'm relatively new to Windows Forms, and it's quite a jungle of functionality & MSDN docs, so also thanks for the specific doc pointer to Validating. <nitpick>The OP mentions that immediately disallowing/indicating an invalidating character is ideal, but Validating seems to require that focus be moved to another form/control before it takes effect.</nitpick> Still, this is a great approach and always worth considering in the more general case. –  billisphere Jul 23 at 15:37

Hi you can do something like this in the textchanged event of the textbox.

here is a demo

    private void textBox1_TextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        string actualdata = string.Empty;
        char[] entereddata = textBox1.Text.ToCharArray();
        foreach (char aChar in entereddata.AsEnumerable())
        {
            if (Char.IsDigit(aChar))
            {
                actualdata = actualdata + aChar;
                // MessageBox.Show(aChar.ToString());
            }
            else
            {
                MessageBox.Show(aChar + " is not numeric");
                actualdata.Replace(aChar, ' ');
                actualdata.Trim();
            }
        }
        textBox1.Text = actualdata;
    }
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This might be useful. It allows "real" numeric values, including proper decimal points and preceding plus or minus signs. Call it from within the related KeyPress event.

       private bool IsOKForDecimalTextBox(char theCharacter, TextBox theTextBox)
    {
        // Only allow control characters, digits, plus and minus signs.
        // Only allow ONE plus sign.
        // Only allow ONE minus sign.
        // Only allow the plus or minus sign as the FIRST character.
        // Only allow ONE decimal point.
        // Do NOT allow decimal point or digits BEFORE any plus or minus sign.

        if (
            !char.IsControl(theCharacter)
            && !char.IsDigit(theCharacter)
            && (theCharacter != '.')
            && (theCharacter != '-')
            && (theCharacter != '+')
        )
        {
            // Then it is NOT a character we want allowed in the text box.
            return false;
        }



        // Only allow one decimal point.
        if (theCharacter == '.'
            && theTextBox.Text.IndexOf('.') > -1)
        {
            // Then there is already a decimal point in the text box.
            return false;
        }

        // Only allow one minus sign.
        if (theCharacter == '-'
            && theTextBox.Text.IndexOf('-') > -1)
        {
            // Then there is already a minus sign in the text box.
            return false;
        }

        // Only allow one plus sign.
        if (theCharacter == '+'
            && theTextBox.Text.IndexOf('+') > -1)
        {
            // Then there is already a plus sign in the text box.
            return false;
        }

        // Only allow one plus sign OR minus sign, but not both.
        if (
            (
                (theCharacter == '-')
                || (theCharacter == '+')
            )
            && 
            (
                (theTextBox.Text.IndexOf('-') > -1)
                ||
                (theTextBox.Text.IndexOf('+') > -1)
            )
            )
        {
            // Then the user is trying to enter a plus or minus sign and
            // there is ALREADY a plus or minus sign in the text box.
            return false;
        }

        // Only allow a minus or plus sign at the first character position.
        if (
            (
                (theCharacter == '-')
                || (theCharacter == '+')
            )
            && theTextBox.SelectionStart != 0
            )
        {
            // Then the user is trying to enter a minus or plus sign at some position 
            // OTHER than the first character position in the text box.
            return false;
        }

        // Only allow digits and decimal point AFTER any existing plus or minus sign
        if  (
                (
                    // Is digit or decimal point
                    char.IsDigit(theCharacter)
                    ||
                    (theCharacter == '.')
                )
                &&
                (
                    // A plus or minus sign EXISTS
                    (theTextBox.Text.IndexOf('-') > -1)
                    ||
                    (theTextBox.Text.IndexOf('+') > -1)
                )
                &&
                    // Attempting to put the character at the beginning of the field.
                    theTextBox.SelectionStart == 0
            )
        {
            // Then the user is trying to enter a digit or decimal point in front of a minus or plus sign.
            return false;
        }

        // Otherwise the character is perfectly fine for a decimal value and the character
        // may indeed be placed at the current insertion position.
        return true;
    }
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Take a look at Input handling in WinForm

I have posted my solution which uses the ProcessCmdKey and OnKeyPress events on the textbox. The comments show you how to use a Regex to verify the keypress and block/allow appropriately.

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you could use TextChanged/ Keypress event, use a regex to filter on numbers and take some action.

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Sorry to wake the dead, but I thought someone might find this useful for future reference.

Here is how I handle it. It handles floating point numbers, but can easily be modified for integers.

Basically you can only press 0 - 9 and .

You can only have one 0 before the .

All other characters are ignored and the cursor position maintained.

    private bool _myTextBoxChanging = false;

    private void myTextBox_TextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        validateText(myTextBox);
    }

    private void validateText(TextBox box)
    {
        // stop multiple changes;
        if (_myTextBoxChanging)
            return;
        _myTextBoxChanging = true;

        string text = box.Text;
        if (text == "")
            return;
        string validText = "";
        bool hasPeriod = false;
        int pos = box.SelectionStart;
        for (int i = 0; i < text.Length; i++ )
        {
            bool badChar = false;
            char s = text[i];
            if (s == '.')
            {
                if (hasPeriod)
                    badChar = true;
                else
                    hasPeriod = true;
            }
            else if (s < '0' || s > '9')
                badChar = true;

            if (!badChar)
                validText += s;
            else
            {
                if (i <= pos)
                    pos--;
            }
        }

        // trim starting 00s
        while (validText.Length >= 2 && validText[0] == '0')
        {
            if (validText[1] != '.')
            {
                validText = validText.Substring(1);
                if (pos < 2)
                    pos--;
            }
            else
                break;
        }

        if (pos > validText.Length)
            pos = validText.Length;
        box.Text = validText;
        box.SelectionStart = pos;
        _myTextBoxChanging = false;
    }

Here is a quickly modified int version:

    private void validateText(TextBox box)
    {
        // stop multiple changes;
        if (_myTextBoxChanging)
            return;
        _myTextBoxChanging = true;

        string text = box.Text;
        if (text == "")
            return;
        string validText = "";
        int pos = box.SelectionStart;
        for (int i = 0; i < text.Length; i++ )
        {
            char s = text[i];
            if (s < '0' || s > '9')
            {
                if (i <= pos)
                    pos--;
            }
            else
                validText += s;
        }

        // trim starting 00s 
        while (validText.Length >= 2 && validText.StartsWith("00")) 
        { 
            validText = validText.Substring(1); 
            if (pos < 2) 
                pos--; 
        } 

        if (pos > validText.Length)
            pos = validText.Length;
        box.Text = validText;
        box.SelectionStart = pos;
        _myTextBoxChanging = false;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I need help. Here in your example you are working on TextBox. But I've the textvalue. so I've not been able to use '.SelectionStart'. Is there any way to get the result using the textvalue? Please help.. –  Sukanya Mar 30 '12 at 6:18
1  
This solution is reinventing the wheel with caveats. Localization for example. –  Julien Guertault May 8 '12 at 8:05
int Number;
bool isNumber;
isNumber = int32.TryPase(textbox1.text, out Number);

if (!isNumber)
{ 
    (code if not an integer);
}
else
{
    (code if an integer);
}
share|improve this answer
    
LOL - Battling edits! Rolled mine back - Martin's is better. –  T.Rob Nov 20 '11 at 5:36

I would handle it in the KeyDown event.

void TextBox_KeyDown(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
        {
            char c = Convert.ToChar(e.PlatformKeyCode);
            if (!char.IsDigit(c))
            {
                e.Handled = true;
            }
        }
share|improve this answer
    
What about Keys like "Backspace", "Delete", "Arrow-Key-Left", "Arrow-Key-Right", Copy and Paste, Digits entered by Numpad (they are traded as !digit) –  user799821 May 27 '13 at 10:19

This one works with copy and paste, drag and drop, key down, prevents overflow and is pretty simple

public partial class IntegerBox : TextBox 
{
    public IntegerBox()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        this.Text = 0.ToString();
    }

    protected override void OnPaint(PaintEventArgs pe)
    {
        base.OnPaint(pe);
    }

    private String originalValue = 0.ToString();

    private void Integerbox_KeyPress(object sender, KeyPressEventArgs e)
    {
        originalValue = this.Text;
    }

    private void Integerbox_TextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        try
        {
            if(String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(this.Text))
            {
                this.Text = 0.ToString();
            }
            this.Text = Convert.ToInt64(this.Text.Trim()).ToString();
        }
        catch (System.OverflowException)
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Value entered is to large max value: " + Int64.MaxValue.ToString(), "Error", MessageBoxButtons.OK, MessageBoxIcon.Error);
            this.Text = originalValue;
        }
        catch (System.FormatException)
        {                
            this.Text = originalValue;
        }
        catch (System.Exception ex)
        {
            this.Text = originalValue;
            MessageBox.Show(ex.Message, "Error", MessageBoxButtons.OK , MessageBoxIcon.Error);
        }
    }       
}
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private void txt3_KeyPress(object sender, KeyPressEventArgs e)
{
    for (int h = 58; h <= 127; h++)
    {
        if (e.KeyChar == h)             //58 to 127 is alphabets tat will be         blocked
        {
            e.Handled = true;
        }
    }
    for(int k=32;k<=47;k++)
    {
        if (e.KeyChar == k)              //32 to 47 are special characters tat will 
        {                                  be blocked
            e.Handled = true;
        }
    }
}

try this is very simple

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3 solution

1)

//Add to the textbox's KeyPress event
//using Regex for number only textBox

private void txtBox_KeyPress(object sender, KeyPressEventArgs e)
{
if (!System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex.IsMatch(e.KeyChar.ToString(), "\\d+"))
e.Handled = true;
}

2) an another solution from msdn

// Boolean flag used to determine when a character other than a number is entered.
private bool nonNumberEntered = false;
// Handle the KeyDown event to determine the type of character entered into the     control.
private void textBox1_KeyDown(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
{
// Initialize the flag to false.
nonNumberEntered = false;
// Determine whether the keystroke is a number from the top of the keyboard.
if (e.KeyCode < Keys.D0 || e.KeyCode > Keys.D9)
{
    // Determine whether the keystroke is a number from the keypad.
    if (e.KeyCode < Keys.NumPad0 || e.KeyCode > Keys.NumPad9)
    {
        // Determine whether the keystroke is a backspace.
        if (e.KeyCode != Keys.Back)
        {
            // A non-numerical keystroke was pressed.
            // Set the flag to true and evaluate in KeyPress event.
            nonNumberEntered = true;
        }
    }
}

}

private void textBox1_KeyPress(object sender, KeyPressEventArgs e)
{
    if (nonNumberEntered == true)
    {
       MessageBox.Show("Please enter number only..."); 
       e.Handled = true;
    }
}

source http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.windows.forms.control.keypress(v=VS.90).aspx

3) using the MaskedTextBox: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.windows.forms.maskedtextbox.aspx

share|improve this answer

In button click you can check text of textbox by for loop:

char[] c = txtGetCustomerId.Text.ToCharArray();
bool IsDigi = true;

for (int i = 0; i < c.Length; i++)
     {
       if (c[i] < '0' || c[i] > '9')
      { IsDigi = false; }
     }
 if (IsDigi)
    { 
     // do something
    }
share|improve this answer

Simpler answer:

_textBox.TextChanged += delegate(System.Object o, System.EventArgs e)
{
    TextBox _tbox = o as TextBox;
    _tbox.Text = new string(_tbox.Text.Where(c => (char.IsDigit(c)) || (c == '.')).ToArray());
};
share|improve this answer

FAIL-SAFE and simple "recursive" method, which can be used with multiple textboxes.

It blocks the wrong keyboard typed characters and also pasted values etc. It only accepts integer numbers, and the maximum number length is the maximum length of a string type (which is int, really long!)

public void Check_If_Int_On_TextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
   // This method checks that each inputed character is a number. Any non-numeric
   // characters are removed from the text

   TextBox textbox = (TextBox)sender;

   // If the text is empty, return
   if (textbox.Text.Length == 0) { return; }

   // Check the new Text value if it's only numbers
   byte parsedValue;
   if (!byte.TryParse(textbox.Text[(textbox.Text.Length - 1)].ToString(), out parsedValue))
   {
      // Remove the last character as it wasn't a number
      textbox.Text = textbox.Text.Remove((textbox.Text.Length - 1));

      // Move the cursor to the end of text
      textbox.SelectionStart = textbox.Text.Length;
    }
 }
share|improve this answer

It seems like many of the current answers to this question are manually parsing the input text. If you're looking for a specific built-in numeric type (e.g. int or double), why not just delegate the work to that type's TryParse method? For example:

public class IntTextBox : TextBox
{
    string PreviousText = "";
    int BackingResult;

    public IntTextBox()
    {
        TextChanged += IntTextBox_TextChanged;
    }

    public bool HasResult { get; private set; }

    public int Result
    {
        get
        {
            return HasResult ? BackingResult : default(int);
        }
    }

    void IntTextBox_TextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        HasResult = int.TryParse(Text, out BackingResult);

        if (HasResult || string.IsNullOrEmpty(Text))
        {
            // Commit
            PreviousText = Text;
        }
        else
        {
            // Revert
            var changeOffset = Text.Length - PreviousText.Length;
            var previousSelectionStart =
                Math.Max(0, SelectionStart - changeOffset);

            Text = PreviousText;
            SelectionStart = previousSelectionStart;
        }
    }
}

If you want something more generic but still compatible with Visual Studio's Designer:

public class ParsableTextBox : TextBox
{
    TryParser BackingTryParse;
    string PreviousText = "";
    object BackingResult;

    public ParsableTextBox()
        : this(null)
    {
    }

    public ParsableTextBox(TryParser tryParse)
    {
        TryParse = tryParse;

        TextChanged += ParsableTextBox_TextChanged;
    }

    public delegate bool TryParser(string text, out object result);

    public TryParser TryParse
    {
        set
        {
            Enabled = !(ReadOnly = value == null);

            BackingTryParse = value;
        }
    }

    public bool HasResult { get; private set; }

    public object Result
    {
        get
        {
            return GetResult<object>();
        }
    }

    public T GetResult<T>()
    {
        return HasResult ? (T)BackingResult : default(T);
    }

    void ParsableTextBox_TextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (BackingTryParse != null)
        {
            HasResult = BackingTryParse(Text, out BackingResult);
        }

        if (HasResult || string.IsNullOrEmpty(Text))
        {
            // Commit
            PreviousText = Text;
        }
        else
        {
            // Revert
            var changeOffset = Text.Length - PreviousText.Length;
            var previousSelectionStart =
                Math.Max(0, SelectionStart - changeOffset);

            Text = PreviousText;
            SelectionStart = previousSelectionStart;
        }
    }
}

And finally, if you want something fully generic and don't care about Designer support:

public class ParsableTextBox<T> : TextBox
{
    TryParser BackingTryParse;
    string PreviousText;
    T BackingResult;

    public ParsableTextBox()
        : this(null)
    {
    }

    public ParsableTextBox(TryParser tryParse)
    {
        TryParse = tryParse;

        TextChanged += ParsableTextBox_TextChanged;
    }

    public delegate bool TryParser(string text, out T result);

    public TryParser TryParse
    {
        set
        {
            Enabled = !(ReadOnly = value == null);

            BackingTryParse = value;
        }
    }

    public bool HasResult { get; private set; }

    public T Result
    {
        get
        {
            return HasResult ? BackingResult : default(T);
        }
    }

    void ParsableTextBox_TextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (BackingTryParse != null)
        {
            HasResult = BackingTryParse(Text, out BackingResult);
        }

        if (HasResult || string.IsNullOrEmpty(Text))
        {
            // Commit
            PreviousText = Text;
        }
        else
        {
            // Revert
            var changeOffset = Text.Length - PreviousText.Length;
            var previousSelectionStart =
                Math.Max(0, SelectionStart - changeOffset);

            Text = PreviousText;
            SelectionStart = previousSelectionStart;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

IT IS SHOULD EASIER THAN OTHERS IT WILL BE AUTOMATICALY FIX LAST WRONG CHARACTERS

private void txt_miktar_TextChanged(object sender, TextChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if ((sender as TextBox).Text.Length < 1)
        {
            return;
        }
        try
        {
            int adet = Convert.ToInt32((sender as TextBox).Text);
        }
        catch
        {
            string s = "";
            s = (sender as TextBox).Text;
            s = s.Substring(0, s.Length - 1);
            (sender as TextBox).Text = s;
            (sender as TextBox).Select(s.Length, s.Length);
        }
    }
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With this method you fix it after the damage is done, and thus see it in the GUI. –  FrieK Aug 14 at 8:07

protected by Community Nov 21 '11 at 8:36

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