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How can I generate all possible bit combinations in an array of bits of length n. If I start with all zeros in my array then there are n possibilities to place the first bit and for these n possibilities there are n-1 possibilities to place the second bit.. unit all n bits are set to one. But so far I didn't manage to program it out.

Also many people pointed out that I can do this by counting from 0 to (2^n)-1 and printing the number in binary. This would be an easy way to solve the problem, however in this case I just let the machine counting instead of telling it where to place ones. I do this for learning, so I would like to know how to program out the ones-placing approach.

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@Fred if I know a lisp answer and a C# answer am I allowed to add "[lisp]" and "[c#]" or should we just replace all those by "[language-agnostic]"? –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jan 8 '11 at 11:48
    
@Johannes: I would love to see LISP and C# solutions :-) I added the C++ tag because Nils posted the question in the C++ chat, so I assumed he was interested in a C++ solution. And I added the Haskell tag so real Haskell programmers could improve my Haskell solution. –  FredOverflow Jan 8 '11 at 12:01

6 Answers 6

up vote 9 down vote accepted

How would you count manually on paper? You would check the last digit. If it is 0, you set it to 1. If it is already 1, you set it back to 0 and continue with the next digit. So it's a recursive process.

The following program generates all possible combinations by mutating a sequence:

#include <iostream>

template <typename Iter>
bool next(Iter begin, Iter end)
{
    if (begin == end)      // changed all digits
    {                      // so we are back to zero
        return false;      // that was the last number
    }
    --end;
    if ((*end & 1) == 0)   // even number is treated as zero
    {
        ++*end;            // increase to one
        return true;       // still more numbers to come
    }
    else                   // odd number is treated as one
    {
        --*end;            // decrease to zero
        return next(begin, end);   // RECURSE!
    }
}

int main()
{
    char test[] = "0000";
    do
    {
        std::cout << test << std::endl;
    } while (next(test + 0, test + 4));
}

The program works with any sequence of any type. If you need all possible combinations at the same time, just put them into a collection instead of printing them out. Of course you need a different element type, because you cannot put C arrays into a vector. Let's use a vector of strings:

#include <string>
#include <vector>

int main()
{
    std::vector<std::string> combinations;
    std::string test = "0000";
    do
    {
        combinations.push_back(test);
    } while (next(test.begin(), test.end()));
    // now the vector contains all pssible combinations
}

If you don't like recursion, here is an equivalent iterative solution:

template <typename Iter>
bool next(Iter begin, Iter end)
{
    while (begin != end)       // we're not done yet
    {
        --end;
        if ((*end & 1) == 0)   // even number is treated as zero
        {
            ++*end;            // increase to one
            return true;       // still more numbers to come
        }
        else                   // odd number is treated as one
        {
            --*end;            // decrease to zero and loop
        }
    }
    return false;              // that was the last number
}
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This algorithm is not recursive, it's just iterative. Instead of recursing, you could just jump back to the start -- using a recommended control structure, of course :-) A smart compiler might recognise this, but it might not. Of course, the running time is exponential in n, and the stack growth is only linear; so the program will work. But unnecessary recursion is generally a bad thing. –  TonyK Jan 8 '11 at 11:34
    
I wonder if there is an iterative way? –  Nils Jan 8 '11 at 11:37
    
@Tony: I have updated my answer with an iterative solution. –  FredOverflow Jan 8 '11 at 11:41
    
+1 for that –  TonyK Jan 8 '11 at 11:52
    
Very nice algorithm...but is there a better explanation to this algorithm..may be some slides showing its working!! –  Alien01 Jan 10 at 10:33

Such problems are trivially solved functionally. To find the solutions of length n, you first find the solutions of length n-1 and then append '0' and '1' to those solutions, doubling the solution space.

Here is a simple recursive Haskell program:

comb 0 = [[]]

comb n =
    let rest = comb (n-1)
    in  map ('0':) rest
     ++ map ('1':) rest

And here is a test run:

> comb 3
["000","001","010","011","100","101","110","111"]
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20  
replicateM 3 [0,1] –  sdcvvc Jan 8 '11 at 13:43
    
@sdcwc: +1 That's precisely why I added the Haskell tag :) –  FredOverflow Jan 8 '11 at 13:54
    
Also, mapM (\x -> [0, 1]) [1..n], which is (in my opinion) easier to understand, gives all permutations of length n of bits. –  danportin Jan 8 '11 at 20:09
    
Without using monad combinators iterate (concatMap (\xs -> [1:xs, 0:xs]) ) [[]] –  u0b34a0f6ae Oct 6 '11 at 10:23

A "truly" recursive approach in C++:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

void print_digits(int n, std::string const& prefix = "") {
    if (!n) {
        std::cout << prefix << std::endl;
        return;
    }
    print_digits(n-1, prefix + '0');
    print_digits(n-1, prefix + '1');
}

int main(int, char**) {
    print_digits(4);
}
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This is my answer. The advantage is that all the combinations are saved in a two dimension array, but the disadvantage is that you can only use it for a sting long up to 17 digits!!

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
    {
    long long n,i1=0,i2=0, i=1, j, k=2, z=1;
    cin >> n;
    while (i<n){
        k = 2*k;
        i++;
    }
    bool a[k][n], t = false;
    j = n-1;
    i1=0;
    i2 = 0;
    z = 1;
    while (j>=0){
        if(j!=n-1){
        z=z*2;
        }
        i2++;
        t = false;
        i = 0;
    while (i<k){
        i1 = 0;
        while (i1<z){
            if(t==false){
            a[i][j]=false;
            }
            else {
                a[i][j]= true;
            }
            i1++;
            i++;
        }
        if(t==false){
            t = true;
        }else {
            t = false;
        }
    }
    j--;
    }
    i = 0;
    j = 0;
    while (i<k){
        j = 0;
        while (j<n){
            cout << a[i][j];
            j++;
        }
        cout << endl;
        i++;
    }
    return 0;
}
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FredOverflow is right in general.

However, for 1s & 0s you'd better just increment an integer from 0:

int need_digits = 10
unsigned int i=0
while (! i>>need_digits){
    # convert to binary form: shift & check, make an array, or cast to string, anything.
    }

... i guess you won't need more than 32 bits or you'd have to chain multiple integers.. and stick to the previous answer :)

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for the simplicity of the approach. However, that loop condition is grim; please use (for i = 0; i < (1L << need_digits); i++) or similar! –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 8 '11 at 11:34
1  
You didn't read my question completely. –  Nils Jan 8 '11 at 11:35
    
for learning you'd better try not to limit the task with 1s&0s, try generating numbers like [a..c][a..d][a..z] and such ;) –  kolypto Jan 8 '11 at 12:12

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