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If for example I create a new object in a function and I want to return its reference how can I do it?

Lets say I got an IntClass that has a 'int num' field in the private. So i want to create a new element of IntClass in the function and return the reference of that object. I've tried something like that but it seems illegal (from some reason when I do such thing the Binaries gets deleted when I compile the code although I get no errors from the compiler itself (ECLIPSE):

 IntClass* a = new IntClass(10);
 IntClass &ref = *a;
 return ref;

Any ideas how to return a reference then?

EDIT: It's allowed to "assume" that C++ uses a Garbage-Collection

As it's not clear to most of you WHY I "want" to do it so here is the full question:

I got this file (Not made by me and can't be edited):

poly_subtype.h:

#ifndef POLY_SUBTYPE_H
#define POLY_SUBTYPE_H
#include <iostream>
#include "cpu_add.h"
using std::cout;
using std::endl;

//Deriving classes definition
class IntClass;
class DoubleClass;

//The Virtual Number Class. IntClass and FloatClass will derive from this class.
class Number {
    public:
        //return a Number object that's the results of x+this, when x is DoubleClass
        virtual Number& addDouble(DoubleClass& x) = 0;

        //return a Number object that's the results of x+this, when x is IntClass
        virtual Number& addInt(IntClass& x) = 0;

        //return a Number object that's the results of x+this, when x is either
        //IntClass or DoubleClass
        virtual Number& operator+(Number& x) = 0;

        //Print the number stored in the object
        virtual void print_number() = 0;
};

class IntClass : public Number {
    private:
        int my_number;
    public:
        //Constructor
        IntClass(int n):my_number(n) {}

        //returns the number stored in the object
        int get_number()  {return my_number;}

        //print the number stored in the object
        void print_number() {cout << my_number << endl;}

        //return a DoubleClass object that's the result of x+this
        Number& addDouble(DoubleClass& x);

        //return an IntClass object that's the result of x+this
        Number& addInt(IntClass& x);

        //return a Number object that's the result of x+this.
        //The actual class of the returned object depends on x.
        //If x is IntClass, then the result if IntClass.
        //If x is DoubleClass, then the results is DoubleClass.
        Number& operator+(Number& x);
};

class DoubleClass : public Number {
    private:
        double my_number;
    public:
        //Constructor
        DoubleClass(double n):my_number(n) {}

        //returns the number stored in the object
        double get_number()  {return my_number;}

        //Print the number stored in the object
        void print_number() {cout << my_number << endl;}

        //return a DoubleClass object that's the result of x+this
        Number& addDouble(DoubleClass& x);

        //return a DoubleClass object that's the result of x+this
        Number& addInt(IntClass& x);

        //return a DoubleClass object that's the result of x+this.
        //This should work if x is either IntClass or DoubleClass
        Number& operator+( Number& x);
};

#endif

and I've got this file (again, not written by me and can't be edited - says I can use those functions but not the '+' operator.

cpu_add.h:

#ifndef CPU_ADD_H
#define CPU_ADD_H

double add_double_double(double a, double b) {return (a+b);}
double add_int_double(int a, double b) {return ((double)(a)+b);}
int   add_int_int(int a, int b) {return (a+b);}

#endif

My goal is to implement the next functions (which you can find their declarations and functionality in poly_subtype.h above):

Number& IntClass::addInt(IntClass& x);
Number& IntClass::addDouble(DoubleClass& x);
Number& IntClass::operator+(Number& x);
Number& DoubleClass::addInt(IntClass& x);
Number& DoubleClass::addDouble(DoubleClass& x);
Number& DoubleClass::operator+(Number& x);

I hope it's more clear now.

For example, AddInt:

Number& IntClass::addInt(IntClass& x){
 int num = add_int_int(my_number, x.get_number());
 IntClass* a = new IntClass(num);
 IntClass &ref = *a;
 return ref;
}
share|improve this question
    
It's allowed to "assume" that C++ uses a Garbage-Collection –  user550413 Jan 8 '11 at 12:35
    
By the way Eclipse IS NOT a compiler. It's IDE :) –  UmmaGumma Jan 8 '11 at 12:52
    
Why don't you pass IntClass by reference ? void f(IntClass& ref) –  anno Jan 8 '11 at 13:30
2  
Did you try compiling your source manually without the IDE? Your code looks valid, even return *(new IntClass(10)); or return *a; looks valid to me. Maybe the reason why your binaries disappear has nothing to do with this particular question, and the real error is elsewhere. –  Sergey Tachenov Jan 8 '11 at 14:15
    
C++ does not have garbage collection by default. There are some libraries around that do it, but in most C++ projects there is no garbage collector. So in fact you can usually "assume" that C++ has no GC. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 8 '11 at 16:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

While you can do something like you wrote above, it is a bad stile. If a resource is allocated on the free-store you should return a pointer to it, not a reference. Even better, use a smart pointer of the appropriate kind: e.g. std::auto_pointer (or better std/boost::unique_ptr) if the resource is not held by the producer and std::shared_ptr if the opposite is the case. Your code example is legal, but the consumer of the returned reference does not (and cannot) know how to deal with the returned reference.

I can imagine returning a constant reference to an object in scenario like this:

class Producer {
 std::shared_ptr<SomeObject> mObject;

public:
 Producer() : mObject(new SomeObject) {}

 const SomeObject& GetObject() const {
  return *mObject;
 }

};

You could however return a reference to an object with static duration, which has certain drawbacks though - you do not have (appropriate) control over the lifetime of the object., for example:

SomeObject& GetSomeObjectSingletonReference() {
 static SomeObject sInstance;
 return sInstance;
}

Cheers,

Paul

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah I know it's a bad style as I said I wouldn't do that normally. I have tried your last suggestion with the 'static SomeObject' and again like in my own code before when compiling the code with this function the Binaries gets deleted and then I get "Binary Not Found" Error when trying to run the main. I get no errors on the code itself. I have no idea what is the connection between those 2 but that happens only if I include this function within the code. –  user550413 Jan 8 '11 at 12:42
    
I don't know why your binaries are deleted, this must something specific to your IDE. With regard to returning by reference, the second scenario discribed above is called 'Meyer's singelton' and is useful, if you (a) only want once instance of an object in your program and (b) don't have specific requirements regarding the life-time of the object. Maybe you should write what are you trying to accomplish... –  Paul Michalik Jan 8 '11 at 13:36
    
Thanks, I edited the main question with full "goal". –  user550413 Jan 8 '11 at 14:01
    
Hm, I think the 'accepted' should rather have gone to the second answer which I posted by accident and cannot remove anymore. Glad I could help, anyway. Cheers, Paul –  Paul Michalik Jan 9 '11 at 11:58

Your example code is a memory-leak waiting to happen. Who is responsible for deleting the object when it's finished? The fact that you return a reference (rather than a pointer) makes it even less apparent that an object has been allocated on the heap. At some point, someone would need to do delete &obj;, which is pretty perverse.

In general, you should only return references to objects that are referred to elsewhere (e.g. class members, or heap objects that are pointed to by class members). In your particular case, you're probably best to do something like:

IntClass myFunc()
{
    ...
    return IntClass(10);
}

i.e. return-by-value.

share|improve this answer
    
I was allowed to "assume" that C++ uses a Garbage-Collection. It's not why I want to return a reference - I was asked to do so and I am not sure how to do it (even if normally you wouldn't do so in my code) –  user550413 Jan 8 '11 at 12:30
1  
@user: That has to be one of the stupidest assumptions ever :) –  FredOverflow Jan 8 '11 at 12:32
4  
@user550413: C++ doesn't have a garbage-collector, so by making that assumption, you'll end up with completely broken code. No-one here is going to help you write broken code! –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 8 '11 at 12:37
    
I could name his name :D But as I said when I include this function within the code (yeah I know it's wrong and there is no garbage collector in C++) the Binaries disappears. You say it's because of the stupid assumption of Mr. X? –  user550413 Jan 8 '11 at 12:55
2  
@user550413: The binaries always disappear when you re-compile, it's just that they are re-created if compilation and linking was successful. Evidently, there is a compilation/linker error somewhere. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 8 '11 at 13:03

Why do you want to return a reference in the first place? Just return values instead of references. The compiler usually optimizes the copy away, if that's your concern.

See Effective C++, Item 21.

share|improve this answer
    
It's not why I want to return a reference - I was asked to do so and I am not sure how to do it (even if normally you wouldn't do so in my code). Also, as I said above memory leaks are not a concern at my question as I was allowed to "assume" that C++ uses a Garbage-Collection. So is there any way to return a reference to the object and not a copy or a pointer? –  user550413 Jan 8 '11 at 12:34
2  
@user: Who asked you to do it? If you really insist to return a reference to a dynamically allocated object, you already gave yourself the answer in your question. That code should work, it's just that any serious C++ programmer will vomit in your face if he sees it. –  FredOverflow Jan 8 '11 at 12:37
    
@FredOverflow: I could name his name :D But as I said when I include this function within the code (yeah I know it's wrong and there is no garbage collector in C++) the Binaries disappears. You say it's because of the stupid assumption of Mr. X? –  user550413 Jan 8 '11 at 12:59
1  
@user: What? No, there's probably something wrong with your IDE or whatnot. No C++ compiler would delete a binary just because you do something non-idiomatic. –  FredOverflow Jan 8 '11 at 13:03
    
@FredOverflow: I've tried re-installing but still same problem. It appears that if I insert the function as a comment everything is okay. If i take it out of the comment and compile the Binaries disappears and then if I insert it again as a comment and compile the Binaries IS BACK! –  user550413 Jan 8 '11 at 13:21

Oh, I see now. You are supposed to implement a mutating operation which modifies 'this' object a returns a reference to it. So it's like:

Number& YourNumber::Add(const YourNumber& pX) {
 // do addition which mutates this...
 return *this;
}
share|improve this answer

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