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I'm wondering how others handle this situation... and how to apply the Don't Repeat Yourself (DRY) principle to this situation.

I find myself constantly PIVOTing or writing CASE statements in T-SQL to present Months as columns. I generally have some fields that will include (1) a date field and (2) a value field. When I present this back to a user through an ASPX page or Reporting Services I need to have the last right-most 14 columns to have this pattern:

[Year],[Jan],[Feb],[Mar],[Apr],[May],[Jun],[Jul],[Aug],[Sep],[Oct],[Nov],[Dec],[Total]

Where year is the year as an int and every other field is the value field summed for that month (except for [Total] which is the total value field for the year).

I'd like to find one re-usable way to handle this. Open to all suggestions (T-SQL / ANSI SQL)

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DRY stands for Don't Repeat Yourself, not Do Not Repeat –  Samuel Jan 21 '09 at 3:40
    
LOL. Nice catch. That was a typo. –  BuddyJoe Jan 21 '09 at 4:13
    
I'm tempted to give the XML data type in Microsoft SQL 2005 a try. This way I may be able to use a scalar function to do some of the work. –  BuddyJoe Jan 21 '09 at 4:17
1  
"Don't Repeat Yourself" means "Build Reusable Abstractions". SQL, like Assembly, is not the best language for abstraction. –  yfeldblum Jan 21 '09 at 16:59
    
I agree. But I think it also means "Be Productive"... and I was tired of writing these "pivots" over and over. I think Cade Roux set me on the right path (see comments on his answer). I abstracted as best I could in T-SQL and this usually leads you into Functions. –  BuddyJoe Jan 21 '09 at 17:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This isn't exactly what you're looking for, but I've done a lot of repetitive UNPIVOT, and typically, I would code-gen this, with some kind of standardized naming and use CTEs heavily:

WITH P AS (
	SELECT Some Data
			,[234] -- These are stats
			,[235]
	FROM Whatever
     )
,FINAL_UNPIVOTED AS (
	SELECT Some Data
			,[STAT]
	FROM P
	UNPIVOT (
		STAT FOR BASE IN ([234], [235]) 
	) AS unpvt
	WHERE STAT <> 0
)
SELECT Some Data
              ,CONVERT(int, FINAL_UNPIVOTED.[BASE]) AS [BASE]
              ,FINAL_UNPIVOTED.[STAT]
FROM FINAL_UNPIVOTED

You can codegen by inspecting a table or view and using something like this:

DECLARE @sql_unpivot AS varchar(MAX)
SELECT @sql_unpivot = COALESCE(@sql_unpivot + ',', '') + COLUMN_NAME
FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES
WHERE TABLE_NAME = 'whatever'

And templatizing the code:

SET @template = '
    WITH P AS (
    	SELECT Some Data
    			,{@sql_unpivot}
                  FROM Whatever
         )
    ,FINAL_UNPIVOTED AS (
    	SELECT Some Data
    			,[STAT]
    	FROM P
    	UNPIVOT (
    		STAT FOR BASE IN ({@sql_unpivot}) 
    	) AS unpvt
    	WHERE STAT <> 0
    )
    SELECT Some Data
                  ,CONVERT(int, FINAL_UNPIVOTED.[BASE]) AS [BASE]
                  ,FINAL_UNPIVOTED.[STAT]
    FROM FINAL_UNPIVOTED
'
SET @sql = REPLACE(@template, '{@sql_unpivot}', @sql_unpivot)

etc.

Of course, it's possible to run this code dynamically or create and SP and you can swap out a view or table you created temporarily just to pick up metadata for something inline.

See comments regarding table-valued functions and OUTER APPLY technique.

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+1 - Thanks for the code. I was going to take a look at dynamic SQL tomorrow if no one had a better suggestion. I still need to figure out the [Total] column... not sure Pivot will do this for me. –  BuddyJoe Jan 21 '09 at 2:39
    
I'm thinking I may try a Table-based Function that takes the datetime as input, and returns the 14 columns. Then JOIN that data in. I'll have to check on the speed implications. –  BuddyJoe Jan 21 '09 at 2:43
    
Table-valued functions returning a single row and then using OUTER APPLY can work, but can be slow for large (meaning several thousands to millions of rows) data sets - but still performs well enough that I use it - if I have to. –  Cade Roux Jan 21 '09 at 4:54
    
Sweet! I have never had to use the APPLY syntax before. But this is the perfect opportunity. I will probably use this from now on whenever I have to add "standard" cols to the output of a table. I have about 14 CASE statements over 100000 records. Can you add a SEE COMMENTS phrase to your answer? –  BuddyJoe Jan 21 '09 at 16:02
    
I have posted my Table Valued Function as another answer on this thread. –  BuddyJoe Jan 21 '09 at 16:50

It's late and I might be missing something obvious here, but will a Months table with a row for each month help you do that?

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makes it easier to group a count() on the month –  Isaac Dealey Jan 20 '09 at 22:47
    
With a row for each month? or a column? I'm missing what this does... I already have a Months table. –  BuddyJoe Jan 21 '09 at 2:37
/* I leave year and month separate so you can use "real" Months or Fiscal Months */

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[fn_MonthValueColumns] 
(   
    @year int,
    @month int, 
    @measure int 
)
RETURNS TABLE 
AS
RETURN 
(
    SELECT @year as [Year],
        CASE WHEN @month = 1 THEN @measure ELSE 0 END AS [Jan], 
        CASE WHEN @month = 2 THEN @measure ELSE 0 END AS [Feb], 
        CASE WHEN @month = 3 THEN @measure ELSE 0 END AS [Mar], 
        CASE WHEN @month = 4 THEN @measure ELSE 0 END AS [Apr], 
        CASE WHEN @month = 5 THEN @measure ELSE 0 END AS [May], 
        CASE WHEN @month = 6 THEN @measure ELSE 0 END AS [Jun], 
        CASE WHEN @month = 7 THEN @measure ELSE 0 END AS [Jul], 
        CASE WHEN @month = 8 THEN @measure ELSE 0 END AS [Aug], 
        CASE WHEN @month = 9 THEN @measure ELSE 0 END AS [Sep], 
        CASE WHEN @month = 10 THEN @measure ELSE 0 END AS [Oct], 
        CASE WHEN @month = 11 THEN @measure ELSE 0 END AS [Nov], 
        CASE WHEN @month = 12 THEN @measure ELSE 0 END AS [Dec], 
        @measure AS [Total]
)

  /* 
   use a group by after your own CROSS APPLY to roll-up SUMs for the last 13 fields. 

   this function and a CROSS APPLY against 100000 records ran in 3 seconds.
   for what I am doing, I can live with that performance.
  */
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How about using a view?

If you are always going for the same table/group of tables, a view might make sense. CAVEAT: Beware of such views, when using small sections of big tables .. the view might prevent the optimizer from doing it's job.

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I do use Views. The problem is whenever I need to do this I usually pick up a few views and sometimes also a stored proc. Trying to cut down on the database clutter. I think I am going to write some dynamic SQL this morning and post it. See if anyone else can collaborate and improve it. –  BuddyJoe Jan 21 '09 at 13:35

As @Justice mentioned in comments, DRY generally refers to reusable code, which is much easier in your SQL client's language not in the SQL. If you're open to that option (and admittedly, you may not be), consider a datamapper like MyBatis. The Extraction into objects may be overkill for what your after, but the ability to create SQL snippets and reuse them in different queries sounds like what you're after.

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