Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Let's say we have these four classes:

  • BinaryTree,
  • SplayTree (which is a sub-class of BinaryTree),
  • BinaryNode and
  • SplayNode (which is a sub-class of BinaryNode).

In class BinaryTree I have these 2 functions, and in SplayTree I would like to reuse the first one, because it works in the same way as in SplayTree.

//BinaryTree.cpp
bool Find(const T &data) const
{
    Node<T> *found = Find2(data, root); 
    //...
} 
virtual Node<T> * Find2(const T &data, Node<T> *node) const
{
    //...
}

//SplayTree.cpp
using BinaryTree::Find; 
virtual SplayNode<T> * Find2(const T &data, SplayNode<T> *node) const
{
    //...
}

Now, the problem is when I have an instance of SplayTree and I call Find, the Binary::Find2 is called instead of SplayTree::Find2, which is what I want.

So, how can I do this?

EDIT:

Corrected some mistakes and refactored the quetion, I hope it's clearer now.

share|improve this question
1  
The answer you have accepted is not a solution to your real problem, but rather a different design approach. The actual problem is that SplayTree::Find2 is not an override of BinaryTree::Find2 due to the different set of arguments. C++ does not allow for covariant arguments (only covariant return) in overriding functions. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 8 '11 at 20:43
up vote 4 down vote accepted

The CRTP idiom is used to solve problems like this. Basically, you derive from a template that gets the derived class as a template parameter, so you can use the type in return values etc.

In your instance, you need to create a common base-template for the two tree-types and implement your Find there, while implementing Find2 in the derived classes:

template <class T> class BaseTree
{
public:
  bool Find()
  {
    typename T::NodeType* NodePtr = static_cast<T*>(this)->Find2(...);
  }
}

template <class T>
class BinaryTree<T> : public BaseTree<BinaryTree<T>>
{
public:
  typedef Node<T> NodeType;
  NodeType Find2(); // will be called from BaseTree
};

template <class T>
class SplayTree : public BaseTree<SplayTree<T>>
{
  typedef SplayNode<T> NodeType;
  NodeType Find2(); // dito
};

This basically implements 'static polymorphism'. The benefit against normal polymorphism is that you can use return types as you'd like.

Edit: Added more detailed description to better suit the OP.

share|improve this answer

The problem you are facing is that SplayTree::Find2 is not an override of BinaryTree::Find2, but rather a different overload (that at the same time hides the original function). The reason why it is a different function is that C++ has support for covariant return types, but not arguments to methods, and thus

At the BinaryTree level the call to Find2 takes an argument of type Node<T>, and the only override for such a method is BinaryTree::Find2. If you want the method call to be dispatched to the most derived type, you have to override the method, that is provide a method with the same exact signature in the most derived class.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.