Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've read in many sources that Google's recommended way to add GA code (link) can slow down page loading. StackOverflow itself does not place it at the header (as Google recommends) but at the bottom of the page.

So should I go with Google, StackOverflow—or should I use jQuery's getScript?

share|improve this question
    
Nobody answered the part of the question "should I use jQuery's getScript". That approach looks promising. –  John Pick Apr 12 '12 at 0:33

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Google Analytics recommends placing the asynchronous snippet just before the </head> tag.

<script type="text/javascript">

  var _gaq = _gaq || [];
  _gaq.push(['_setAccount', 'UA-XXXXX-X']);
  _gaq.push(['_trackPageview']);

  (function() {
    var ga = document.createElement('script'); ga.type = 'text/javascript'; ga.async = true;
    ga.src = ('https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https://ssl' : 'http://www') + '.google-analytics.com/ga.js';
    var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s);
  })();

</script>

In the days before the asynchronous syntax, the recommendation was to put it before the closing </body> tag, to prevent page load blocking. This is no longer a serious concern.

The only things this script will do in a blocking way is it will create a simple JavaScript array, insert some basic values, and then execute an anonymous function. The browser will move on and continue to load, while in the background the browser will request ga.js from Google servers, and then execute a __utm.gif request to Google's servers with the tracking information.

Because this script is inserted in a non-blocking, asynchronous way, it doesn't prevent your content from loading on time. Placing it this early will allow you to track a larger percentage of people, including those who click away when only part of the body is loaded. Further, it reduces the possibility for error if you have event-driven tracking within your page.

Also, because Google Analytics is nearly always served from one of two URLs (Google's HTTP and HTTPS versions), the file is likely cached on basically any browser your users have, meaning that the script itself won't have to be transferred.

Simply put, best results are guaranteed if you put that snippet at the end of your </head> tag.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi @yc this the explanation I was looking for, thank you! –  Bruno Ligutti Jan 8 '11 at 22:01
    
Async scripts not supported in older browsers, so they will still block. IE 9- for example. –  Suor Jul 25 '13 at 6:51
    
@Suor that's just support for the async attribute. The dynamic script injection is itself asynchronous (as opposed to a simple classical script tag). The async attribute here isn't actually strictly necessary. This is enough to achieve async-ness in nearly all major browsers, old IE included. –  Yahel Jul 25 '13 at 12:20

The best way is to use Asynchronous analytics. In order to track every click, downloads, etc...

you can find all the informations here: http://code.google.com/apis/analytics/docs/tracking/asyncTracking.html

Edit: Follow always the google code suggestions, is the best practice to do that.

share|improve this answer

Stack Overflow uses the older "traditional" version of Google's tracking code, which runs synchronously. Google recommends that this version be placed immediately before </body>.

The paged you linked to is for the updated tracking code, which runs asynchronously and should be placed in the <head>

So, you should use Google's latest (asynchronous) snippet in the <head> of your site.

share|improve this answer

Asynchronous version at the end of your <body>.

I.e.:

  <script>
   var _gaq = [['_setAccount', 'UA-xxxxxxx-1'], ['_trackPageview']];
   (function(d, t) {
    var g = d.createElement(t),
        s = d.getElementsByTagName(t)[0];
    g.async = true;
    g.src = ('https:' == location.protocol ? 'https://ssl' : 'http://www') + '.google-analytics.com/ga.js';
    s.parentNode.insertBefore(g, s);
   })(document, 'script');
  </script>
</body>
share|improve this answer
1  
I'd recommend against doing it like this; omitting the _gaq = _gaq || []; declaration means you run the risk of overwriting information that might have been previously added (if you're running multiple scripts). Also, putting all of the values directly in in one declaration might save characters, but it reduces maintainability, as it differs significantly from how any documentation will show the code or any of its modifications. –  Yahel Jan 8 '11 at 17:35

I recently posted a small jQuery plugin to handle this for you. It implements Google's suggestions on asynchronous tracking, but with a touch of jQuery magic. You can find it here!

share|improve this answer
    
thank you! Great insight. –  Bruno Ligutti Jan 8 '11 at 21:59

$.getScript, by default will append the current timestamp to the url to avoid caching. So if you use it, that should be turned off. (Turn "on" caching.)

http://blog.yjl.im/2010/09/jquerify-google-analytics-tracking-code.html

Something like this may work. It's less code than the javascript from Google.

$.ajax(('https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https://ssl' : 'http://www') + '.google-analytics.com/ga.js', {dataType: 'script', cache: true})

Also, note that soon this will be replaced with the "isogram" universal analytics code.

share|improve this answer

As explained here:

https://developers.google.com/analytics/devguides/collection/gajs/#SplitSnippet

If your pages are loading more slowly (mine certainly were) you can split the code into two parts, putting the first in the <HEAD>

<script type="text/javascript">
  var _gaq = _gaq || [];
  _gaq.push(['_setAccount', 'UA-XXXXXX-X']);
  _gaq.push(['_trackPageview']);
</script>

and the second at the foot, just above </body>

<script type="text/javascript">
  (function() {
    var ga = document.createElement('script'); ga.type = 'text/javascript'; ga.async = true;
    ga.src = ('https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https://ssl' : 'http://www') + '.google-analytics.com/ga.js';
    var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s);
  })();
</script>

After doing this, my pages are loading as quickly as ever.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.