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If I had threads as below

void thread(){

while() {

lock.acquire();

if(condition not true)

{

Cond.wait()

}

// blah blah

Cond.Signal();

lock.release();
}
}

Well I guess my main question is that whether the signalling thread continues running for a while after cond.signal() or immediately gives up the CPU?. I would like it in some cases not to release the lock before the woken up thread finishes execution and in some other cases it may be beneficial to release the lock immediately after signalling, without waiting for the other woken thread to finish.

I understand that if there are any threads waiting on the condition then they get woken up on Cond.signal(). But what do you mean by woekn up - put on the ready queue or does the scheduler make sure that it runs immediately?. and what about the signalling thread.. does it go to sleep on the same condtion upon signalling? .. so then some other thread has to wake it up to make it release the lock?.

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Could you add some code to your question? –  Apalala Jan 8 '11 at 17:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is in large part dependent on your environment (OS, library, language...) and how the synchronisation primitives are implemented. Since you haven't specified any I'll just give a general answer.

When putting a thread to sleep, most environment will choose to remove it from the scheduler's ready queue and the thread will give up its remaining CPU time. When woken up, the thread is simply placed back into the ready queue and will resume execution the next time the scheduler selects it from the queue.

It's also possible that the thread will do some active waiting (spinning) instead of being removed from the scheduler's ready queue. In this case, the thread will resume execution right away. Note that since a thread can still be run out of CPU of time while spinning, it might have to wait to be rescheduled before waking up. This is a useful strategy if your critical sections are very small and you don't want to pay for the scheduling overheads.

A hybrid approach would be to do a small amount of active waiting before removing the thread from the scheduler's ready queue.

As for the signaling thread, unless specified explicitly by your environment (I can't of any reasons but you never know), I wouldn't expect a call to signal() to block in a way that you have to wake it up. Signal() might have to synchronize itself with other threads calling signal() but those are implementation details and you shouldn't have to do anything about it.

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I am concrened about the signalling thread releasing the lock... so it would have to wait until it gets a chance to run again to release the lock. –  dasman Jan 8 '11 at 18:21
    
@user Well unless lock is a semaphore that can hold more then 1 resource, there will always be at most thread in the critical section, so it can only be released once. More importantly, I have no idea what you're trying to accomplish in your code. Could you give a little more detail in the original question? –  Ze Blob Jan 8 '11 at 18:40
    
Does it really matter what I do in the critical section?. I understand that the lock can be released only once. Lets suppose there are only 2 threads, thread1 & thread 2. thread1 has gone to sleep on cond.wait(). thread2 does something that makes the condition true and signals thread1. thread1 wakes up with the lock, does the work, and signals other threads –  dasman Jan 8 '11 at 19:21
    
Does it really matter what I do in the critical section?. I understand that the lock can be released only once. Lets suppose there are only 2 threads, thread1 & thread 2. thread1 has gone to sleep on cond.wait() ( i assume that when it sleeps it releases the lock). thread2 does something that makes the condition true and signals thread1. thread1 wakes up with the lock (thts advntge of cond var right?) , does the work, (as you said lets assume thread2 doesnt block on signal) releases the lock. So when thread2 gets cpu does it resume execution after the cond.signal() & release the lock again?. –  dasman Jan 8 '11 at 19:31
    
@user I think I understand the problem now. Signal should not release the lock it's binded to in order to wake up a thread. The thread that waken will still need to acquire the lock before resuming. If the lock is not available, the thread should wait on the lock until it's available before resuming. I still recommend checking you're implementation's documentation to be sure of the behavior. –  Ze Blob Jan 8 '11 at 20:04

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