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I am implementing an HTML form with some checkbox input elements, and I want to have a Select All or DeSelect All button. However, I do not want to rely on the name of the input element (like this example) but rather the type because I have multiple checkbox groups with different names. Is there a way to check and uncheck all checkbox input elements within a form with JavaScript by relying on the type instead of the name?

Edit: We rely on YUI libraries, so I have access YUI if that provides a solution.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 21 down vote accepted

This should do it:

<script>
function checkUncheck(form, setTo) {
    var c = document.getElementById(form).getElementsByTagName('input');
    for (var i = 0; i < c.length; i++) {
        if (c[i].type == 'checkbox') {
            c[i].checked = setTo;
        }
    }
}
</script>

<form id='myForm'>
<input type='checkbox' name='test' value='1'><br>
<input type='checkbox' name='test' value='1'><br>
<input type='checkbox' name='test' value='1'><br>
<input type='checkbox' name='test' value='1'><br>
<input type='checkbox' name='test' value='1'><br>
<input type='button' onclick="checkUncheck('myForm', true);" value='Check'>
<input type='button' onclick="checkUncheck('myForm', false);" value='Uncheck'>
</form>
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It seems a bit risky to assume that what you want is to flip the state of each checkbox. On the other hand, the code does provide a useful starting point for solving the OP's problem. –  Ben Jan 20 '09 at 23:45
    
I would suggest having a second attribute of wether to check/uncheck, because your method will simply toggle all, not check/uncheck all. –  Tracker1 Jan 20 '09 at 23:46
    
ask and ye shall receive. –  Paolo Bergantino Jan 20 '09 at 23:47
    
Is reasonable to only fetch the inputs, therefor leaving out all selects or textareas. Like in this example. –  jishi Jan 20 '09 at 23:50
    
Thanks Paolo! Your solution worked great! –  Julien Chastang Jan 21 '09 at 5:14
function findCheckBoxes(el, check) {
        for(var i=0;el.childNodes[i];i++)
        {
            var child = el.childNodes[i];
            if (child.type=="checkbox")
            {
                child.checked = check;
            }
            if (child.childNodes.length > 0)
                this.findCheckBoxes(child, check);
        }
    }
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This would assume that the form only have inputs as childelements, which seldom is the case. And you don't need recursive functions for this. –  jishi Jan 20 '09 at 23:49

iterate through the form.elements collection and check .type == "checkbox".

var button = getSelectAllButtonInFormSomeHow();
/*all formelements have a reference to the form. And the form has an elements-collection.*/
var elements = button.form.elements;

for(var i = 0; i < elements.length;i++) {
    var input = elements[i];
    if (input.tagName == "input" && input.type == "checkbox") input.checked = true;
}
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I don't really understand why the formatting doesn't work. It looks okay in the preview... –  jishi Jan 20 '09 at 23:39
    
okay, made it work. This is standard DOM-methods. –  jishi Jan 20 '09 at 23:42

Every input element has an attribute, type, which for checkboxes is "checkbox" so you could try something like this:

for (var i = 0; i < document.myForm.elements.length; i++) {
    if (document.myForm.elements[i].type == "checkbox") {
        document.myForm.elements[i].checked = true;
    }
}
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If jQuery is an option you can do this rather easily.

See the documentation on jQuery selectors. (The last example in the section shows how to do it with radio buttons but just replace that with check boxes.)

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Thanks SR. Unfortunately, jQuery is not an option, but YUI is. I should probably mention that in the question. –  Julien Chastang Jan 20 '09 at 23:35

Is assigning a class to all required checkbox elements an option? If yes, then this is how I would do it (assuming "class_name" is the name of the css class present in all checkbox elements in question):

function selectCheckBoxes(bChecked) {
   var aCheckBoxes = YAHOO.util.Dom.getElementsByClassName('class_name', 'input');
   for (var i = 0; i < aCheckBoxes.length; i++) {
      aCheckBoxes[i].checked = bChecked;
   }
}

If you want to stay away from classes, but can get parent element by ID (or any other method, I will use ID in the example, though), than you can do this:

function selectCheckBoxes(bChecked) {
   var oParent = document.getElementById('parentsID');
   var aElements = oParent.getElementsByTagName('input');
   for (var i = 0; i < aElements.length; i++) {
      if (aElements[i].type == 'checkbox') {
         aElements[i].checked = bChecked;
      }
   }
}

I would stick to the "class" method, however.

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<html>
<head>
<script>
function selectCheckBox()
{   
     if(document.getElementById('id11').checked==true)
     {
        document.frm.id2.checked=true
        document.frm.id3.checked=true
        document.frm.id4.checked=true
     }
     if(document.getElementById('id11').checked==false)
     {
        document.frm.id2.checked=false
        document.frm.id3.checked=false
        document.frm.id4.checked=false
     }
}
function selectCheckBox1()
{
     if(document.getElementById('id12').checked==false)
     {
        document.frm.id1.checked=false
     }  
}
function selectCheckBox2()
{
     if(document.getElementById('id13').checked==false)
     {
        document.frm.id1.checked=false
     }  
}
function selectCheckBox3()
{
     if(document.getElementById('id14').checked==false)
     {
        document.frm.id1.checked=false
     }  
}
</script>

</head>
<body>
<form name="frm">
All   :<input type="checkbox" id="id11" name="id1" value="1" onClick="selectCheckBox()"><br>
A.    :<input type="checkbox" id="id12" name="id2" value="2" onClick="selectCheckBox1()"><br>
B.    :<input type="checkbox" id="id13" name="id3" value="3" onClick="selectCheckBox2()"><br>
C.    :<input type="checkbox" id="id14" name="id4" value="4" onClick="selectCheckBox3()"><br>
</form>
</body>
</html>
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3  
If relying on the names is bad, relying on the IDs is even worse. Add to that, the way you're doing this means having a function for each checkbox. This is ugly in the extreme, especially if you end up having like 100 checkboxes. –  cHao Jul 10 '11 at 0:06

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