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When setting up attribute locations for an OpenGL shader program, you are faced with two options:

glBindAttribLocation() before linking to explicitly define an attribute location.

or

glGetAttribLocation() after linking to obtain an automatically assigned attribute location.

What is the utility for using one over the other?

And which one, if any, is preferred in practice?

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1  
I didn't bother using glBindAttribLocation in my graphics engine, which worked nicely on linux. When I ported to windows, it was using my normals as vertices - I had to explicitly tell it the order of the variables in my shader via glBindAttribLocation to get it to work... –  Jarrett Oct 18 '13 at 18:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 42 down vote accepted

I know one good reason to prefer explicit location definition.

Consider that you hold your geometry data in Vertex Array Objects. For a given object, you create a VAO in such way that the indices correspond to, for example:

  • index 0: positions,
  • index 1: normals,
  • index 2: texcoords

Now consider that you want to draw one object with two different shaders. One shader requires position and normal data as input, the other - positions and texture coords.

If you compile those shaders, you will notice that the first shader will expect the positions at attribute index 0 and normals at 1. The other would expect positions at 0 but texture coords at 1.

This means that you wouldn't be able to use your VAO with both shaders. Instead of having one VAO per, say, object, you'd need - in the worst case - a separate VAO per object per shader.

Forcing the shaders to use your own attribute numbering convention via glBindAttribLocation can solve this problem easily - all you need to do is to keep a consistent relation between attributes and their estabilished IDs, and force the shaders to use that convention when linking.

(That's not really a big issue if you don't use separate VAOs, but still might make your code clearer.)


BTW:

When setting up attribute locations for an OpenGL shader program, you are faced with two options

There's a third option in OpenGL/GLSL 3.3: Specify the location directly in shader code. It looks like this:

layout(location=0) in vec4 position;

But this is not present in GLSL ES shader language.

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I don't see the point. VAO are really light-weight and you will usually recreate them for each frame. In your case, you would just create different VAOs before calling each shader, won't you? –  PierreBdR Jun 8 '12 at 16:32
    
Yes, you can do that of course. It will work just as well, we're only discussing conventions here. :) –  Kos Jun 8 '12 at 19:03
3  
The third option is actually available in GLES2.0 but the format is slightly different: layout(location = 0) attribute vec4 position; Note that you'll also need this at the top of your GLSL file: #extension GL_EXT_separate_shader_objects : enable –  Gavin Maclean Nov 8 '12 at 15:03
13  
"VAO are really light-weight and you will usually recreate them for each frame. In your case, you would just create different VAOs before calling each shader, won't you?" - No, you won't usually do this, since this in the end completely invalidates the whole purpose of VAOs. Why then use a VAO at all? –  Christian Rau Mar 11 '13 at 13:51

Another answer here is that glGetAttribLocation returns data to the caller, which means that it implicitly requires a pipeline flush. If you call it right after you compile your program, you're essentially forcing asynchronous compilation to occur synchronously.

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Thanks, this is a very important consideration. –  Jing Sep 14 '13 at 6:02

The third option, ie layout(location=0) in vec4 position; in the shader code, is now available in OpenGL ES 3.0/GLSL 300 es. Only for vertex shader input variables though.

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As they hint, Intel cards may not support this (while being perfectly 3.0+ comformant otherwise, as I get it), which is disgusting :) –  mlvljr Aug 9 at 21:35

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