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I've discovered that Scala XML literals are sensitive to whitespace, which is kinda strange, isn't it? since XML parsers don't normally give a damn about spaces between the tags.

This is a bummer because I'd like to set out my XML neatly in my code:

<sample>
  <hello />
</sample>

but Scala considers this to be a different value to

<sample><hello /></sample>

Proof is in the pudding:

scala> val xml1 = <sample><hello /></sample>
xml1: scala.xml.Elem = <sample><hello></hello></sample>

scala> val xml2 = <sample>
     | <hello />
     | </sample>
xml2: scala.xml.Elem = 
<sample>
<hello></hello>
</sample>

scala> xml1 == <sample><hello /></sample>
res0: Boolean = true

scala> xml1 == xml2
res1: Boolean = false

... What gives?

share|improve this question
2  
Because white-space is significant in XML -- it is being turned into text nodes. Most normal XML processing (e.g. XPath) just ignores all but select (possible white-space) text in matched nodes though. Hopefully someone can provide a good solution to make it easier to deal with :p –  user166390 Jan 8 '11 at 22:15
    
Demonstration of the above: <a><b/></a>.child.size => 1, <a> <b/> </a>.child.size => 3. This fact was being hidden by the toString implementation. Why child and not children? I have no idea... –  user166390 Jan 8 '11 at 22:21
    
I had no idea that it was creating text nodes for blank spaces. There's an old Australian colloquialism that expresses my response perfectly: pickle me grandmother! –  David Jan 9 '11 at 4:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

If you liked it you should have put a trim on it:

scala> val xml1 = <sample><hello /></sample>
xml1: scala.xml.Elem = <sample><hello></hello></sample>

scala> val xml2 = <sample>
     | <hello />
     | </sample>
xml2: scala.xml.Elem = 
<sample>
<hello></hello>
</sample>

scala> xml1 == xml2
res14: Boolean = false

scala> xml.Utility.trim(xml1) == xml.Utility.trim(xml2)
res15: Boolean = true
share|improve this answer

If you want to convert the XML literal to a StringBuilder:

scala> val xml1 = <sample><hello /></sample>
xml1: scala.xml.Elem = <sample><hello></hello></sample>

scala> xml.Utility.toXML(xml1, minimizeTags=true)
res2: StringBuilder = <sample><hello /></sample>
share|improve this answer
1  
That's interesting and potentially useful. It turns out, though, that <sample><hello /></sample> == <sample><hello></hello></sample> according to Scala, so you don't have to minimize tags first. –  David Jan 9 '11 at 4:16

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