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This question pertains specifically to shell scripts, but could be about any programming language.

Is there any difference between using multiple if statements and using elif statements in shell scripts? And, a case statement would not work in my situation.

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This depends on the layout and interactions, naturally. –  user166390 Jan 8 '11 at 21:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Yes, potentially. Consider this (C#, Java, whatever):

int x = GetValueFromSomewhere();

if (x == 0)
{
    // Something
    x = 1;
}
else if (x == 1)
{
    // Something else...
}

vs this:

int x = GetValueFromSomewhere();

if (x == 0)
{
    // Something
    x = 1;
}
if (x == 1)
{
    // Something else...
}

In the first case, only one of "Something" or "Something else..." will occur. In the second case, the side-effects of the first block make the condition in the second block true.

Then for another example, the conditions may not be mutually exclusive to start with:

int x = ...;

if (x < 10)
{
    ...
} 
else if (x < 100)
{
    ...
}
else if (x < 1000)
{
    ...
}

If you get rid of the "else" here, then as soon as one condition has matched, the rest will too.

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Great answer, I will accept it once the time limit is up. Thanks! –  Mark Szymanski Jan 8 '11 at 21:27

It has to do with effeciency and your needs. If statements are executed independant of one another. Each one will run. Else if statement's only execute if the previous if's fail.

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if (x == 0) {
    // 1
}


if (x >= 0) {
    // 2
}

if (x <= 0) {
    // 3
}

Above code will produce different value than the code below for x=0.

if (x == 0) {
    // 1
} else if (x >= 0) {
    // 2
} else {
   // 3
}

In the first case all the statements 1, 2, and 3 will be executed for x = 0. In the second case only statements 1 will be.

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-1 because I was asking about else if, not else. –  Mark Szymanski Jan 8 '11 at 21:23
7  
@Mark: The else if construct is actually an else followed by an if: if (a) { } else if (b) { } will compile exactly the same as if (a) { } else { if (b) { } } because the former is in fact parsed as the latter according to the language grammar. (elif in bash is essentially syntactic sugar to prevent you from having to open multiple blocks.) –  cdhowie Jan 8 '11 at 21:28
    
@mark-szymanski answer corrected. Remove down vote if you like. –  fastcodejava Jan 9 '11 at 0:47

When you have multiple if statements, each is evaluated separately, and if the conditions are right, the code in all of them might be executed. If you have if / elif statement, the second condition would be evaluated only after particular result of the evaluation of the first condition.

Consider this pseudocode:

If (cond A) { action 1}
If (cond B) { action 2}

If both cond A and cond B are true, both actions will execute.

On the other hand, this pseudocode:

If (cond A) {action 1}
Elif (cond B) {action 2}

Only one of the twomactions (or neither) will be executed, no matter how both conditions evaluate.

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