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My custom view has a subview as an instance variable. Here is a sample interface:

@interface MyCustomView : NSView {
    NSView *aSubview;
}

@end

Then, in the .m file, I initialize aSubView and add it to the custom view.

- (id)init
{
    self = [super initWithFrame:CGRectMakeFrame(0.0, 0.0, 320.0, 480.0);
    if (self) {
        aSubview = [[NSView alloc] initWithFrame(0.0, 0.0, 100.0, 100.0);

        [self addSubview:aSubview];
    }
    return self;
}

Where should I release aSubView?

In the -dealloc method?

- (void)dealloc
{
    [aSubView release];
    [super dealloc];
}

Or directly after adding it to the custom view in the -init method?

- (id)init
{
    [...]
    [self addSubview:aSubview];
    [aSubview release];
    [...]
}

Which one is the best implementation?

share|improve this question
    
You create it and add it as a subview, which means you own it twice. Your choice is to release the creation ownership immediately and own it only once for the rest of the views' life, or hold onto the subview in an instance variable for that entire time and release it in dealloc at the end of it. As long as both ownerships are balanced out by releases, both ways are equally valid. –  Peter Hosey Jan 8 '11 at 23:33
    
Not entirely; if you have an instance variable as the reference, you should hold a retain until dealloc (if that is your intended lifespan). The least fragile approach is to always hold a retain for the lifespan of any given retaining reference. Of course, this breaks down in the face of retain cycles (which are the devil's work to figure out sometimes). So... I'd recommend releasing in dealloc to balance the implied retain in the initialization method. –  bbum Jan 9 '11 at 0:29
    
Oh, and aSubview is an atypical ivar name. subview or containedView would make more sense. aSubview would be more typical as an argument to a method. –  bbum Jan 9 '11 at 0:36
    
@bbum don't pay attention to variable names, are just placeholders i put there to write some sample code for the question. Obviously the code I'm actually working on is more complicated than this and uses more sensible names for variables. –  massimoksi Jan 9 '11 at 8:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are two retains in your code, serving different purposes. It is best to keep them separate.

Retain #1

The first retain is implied by aSubview = [[NSView alloc] initWithFrame(0.0, 0.0, 100.0, 100.0);. Since aSubview is an instance variable and you seemingly want to keep aSubview around as a valid reference to the view after the initializer has run, it makes sense that the implied retain would be balanced by a release in dealloc.

Retain #2

When added to the view hierarchy, your view instance will be retained by whatever view it is a subview of. That it is self in this case is irrelevant. As long as the view is a part of the view hierarchy, that retain will be in effect. When it is removed, it will be released.


The two are orthogonal realizations of object lifespan. Keeping them separate makes your code less fragile.

For example, if in some future version you were to occasionally remove the view from the view hierarchy with a desire to stick it back later -- the ultimate show/hide, if you will -- then retain #1 above will keep it around.

Similarly, if you were to someday want to forget about the current view, but replace it with a different one, you could simply do:

[aSubview release];
aSubview = [[.... alloc] ... init ... ];

And, in this case, retain #2 above will keep the old view alive in the view hierarchy.

share|improve this answer

I'd say that you should release "aSubview" directly after you add it to the view. (i.e.: As soon as its been retained elsewhere.)

However, I'd also say that there's no value in having "aSubview" as an instance variable - it should just be a local variable within your init method.

share|improve this answer
1  
The "value" is that I can directly access the instance variable in other methods of my custom view instead of dealing with the array of subviews. Please correct me if I'm wrong. –  massimoksi Jan 8 '11 at 22:22
1  
@massimoperi If that's the case, then I'd be tempted to release it within the dealloc as this feels more natural for an instance variable. –  middaparka Jan 8 '11 at 22:24
    
I agree that it feels more natural and conventional. On the other hand, I will have an instance variable with a retain count 2, while with the first solution the retain count will only be 1. But maybe the retain count is not so important. –  massimoksi Jan 8 '11 at 22:32
    
@massimoperi As long as you release it within your dealloc it'll eventually have a retain count of zero, which is all that really matters, unless of course you're planning on getting rid of the subview and keeping your class around, in which case I'd ditch the instance variable (accessing via the subview array if necessary) and release it after you add it to view. –  middaparka Jan 8 '11 at 22:39

I would prefer in the dealloc because When your object contains other objects, you must free them whenever you yourself dealloc.

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