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Apple's Memory Management Programming Guide shows three officially sanctioned techniques for writing accessor methods that need to retain or release object references.

In the case of the first two techniques (reproduced below), the Apple documentation says that "[t]he performance of technique 2 is significantly better than technique 1 in situations where the getter is called much more often than the setter."

// Technique 1
- (NSString*) title
{
    return [[title retain] autorelease];
}

- (void) setTitle: (NSString*) newTitle
{
    if (title != newTitle)
    {
        [title release];
        title = [newTitle retain]; // Or copy, depending on your needs.
    }
}

// Technique 2
- (NSString*) title
{
    return title;
}

- (void) setTitle: (NSString*) newTitle
{
    [title autorelease];
    title = [newTitle retain]; // Or copy, depending on your needs.
}

Is this the only difference between technique 1 and technique 2, or does using one over the other have other subtle consequences of which I might need to be aware? And if technique 2 uses a better performing getter, does it follow that technique 1 uses a better performing setter since title gets an explicit (and presumably immediate) release?

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2 Answers 2

The second getter is fragile (it will crash if somebody access's the object's title and then releases the object), so the first is generally preferable even if marginally slower.

The first setter is more efficient and will work even in situations where an autorelease pool doesn't exist, so it's preferable. The reason it's more efficient is not just because of autorelease vs. release — it doesn't do any work at all if you try to set the property to its existing value.

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If the dealloc method properly clears variables through the accessors, then the second technique won't cause a crash because the title will be autoreleased, and the second setter is faster when the new title is different. It does use more memory, though, since the old title is not immediately released. –  ughoavgfhw Jan 9 '11 at 3:14
    
@ughoavgfhw: Using accessors in dealloc is not proper, and is in fact considered a bad practice by Apple and most Cocoa programmers I've heard comment on the matter. –  Chuck Jan 10 '11 at 1:48
    
@chuck accessing the getter from technique 1 and then releasing will cause a crash as well. –  Remover Jan 13 '11 at 0:31
    
@Remover: Why on earth would that cause a crash? –  Chuck Jan 13 '11 at 2:50
    
@chuck because after the autorelease the retain count should be the same as for technique 2. so a release could potentially cause a crash also, no? but just thinking about it now... there shouldn't be any problem with either if the object is already retained before the get. please correct me if i'm wrong... –  Remover Jan 18 '11 at 2:36

The getter from 2 and the setter from 1:

- (NSString*) title
{
    return title;
}

- (void) setTitle: (NSString*) newTitle
{
    if (title != newTitle)
    {
        [title release];
        title = [newTitle retain]; // Or copy, depending on your needs.
    }
}
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