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I am lost in the following example on page 106 from the book titled Developing Applications with Objective Camel.

let nil_assoc = function x -> raise Not found ; ;
let l = ref nil_assoc;;
let add_assoc_again (k,v) l = l := (function x -> if x=k then v else !l x) ; ;
add_assoc_again ('1',1) l ; ;
add_assoc_again ('2',2) l ; ;

The resulting value for l is a function that points at itself and therefore loops.

I would have thought that the value for l after add_assoc_again ('1', 1) l ;; is function

x -> if x = '1' then 1 else nil_assoc x;;

In continuation, the resulting value for l after add_assoc_again ('2', 2) l ;; should be function

x -> if x ='2' then 2 else ( function x -> if x = '1' then 1 else nil_assoc x ) x;;

I don't see why the resulting value for l is a function that points at itself and therefore the program hangs and loops

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Now that's some creative formatting... (and I must assume it's intentional =/) –  delnan Jan 8 '11 at 23:09

2 Answers 2

!l does not get evaluated when you call add_assoc_again, it is evaluated when you call the function created by the call. At this point l will point to that function, so that's why you get the infinite loop.

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There is a slightly modified version of this code in the new book http://caml.inria.fr/pub/docs/oreilly-book/ocaml-ora-book.pdf which seems to me more clear :

let nil_assoc = function x -> raise Not_found ;;
let add_assoc (k,v) l = function x -> if x = k then v else l x ;;
val add_assoc : 'a * 'b -> ('a -> 'b) -> 'a -> 'b = <fun>

the argument l is clearly a function ('a -> 'b) in the signature of add_assoc, and hence, is not evaluated till it gets called (upon the failure of the if test).

The code continues :

# let l1 = add_assoc (1, 1) nil_assoc;;

here, l1 is equivalent to fun x -> if x = 1 then 1 else nil_assoc x

# let l2 = add_assoc (2, 2) l1;;

l2 is fun x -> if x = 2 then 2 else (fun y -> if y = 1 then 1 else nil_assoc y) 2

which is very simple to understand compared to the version you privided.

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