Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using Ruby 1.9 and I'm wondering if there's a simple regex way to do this.

I have many strings that look like some variation of this:

str = "Allocation:  Random, Control:  Active Control, Endpoint Classification:  Safety Study, Intervention Model:  Parallel Assignment, Masking:  Double Blind (Subject, Caregiver, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor), Primary Purpose:  Treatment"

The idea is that I'd like to break this string into its functional components

  • Allocation: Random
  • Control: Active Control
  • Endpoint Classification: Safety Study
  • Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
  • Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Caregiver, Investigator, Outcomes, Assessor)
  • Primary Purpose: Treatment

The "syntax" of the string is that there is a "key" which consists of one or more "words or other characters" (e.g. Intervention Model) followed by a colon (:). Each key has a corresponding "value" (e.g., Parallel Assignment) that immediately follows the colon (:)…The "value" consists of words, commas (whatever), but the end of the "value" is signaled by a comma.

The # of key/value pairs is variable. I'm also assuming that colons (:) aren't allowed to be part of the "value" and that commas (,) aren't allowed to be part of the "key".

One would think that there is a "regexy" way to break this into its component pieces, but my attempt at making an appropriate matching regex only picks up the first key/value pair and I'm not sure how to capture the others. Any thoughts on how to capture the other matches?

 regex = /(([^,]+?): ([^:]+?,))+?/
=> /(([^,]+?): ([^:]+?,))+?/
irb(main):139:0> str = "Allocation:  Random, Control:  Active Control, Endpoint Classification:  Safety Study, Intervention Model:  Parallel Assignment, Masking:  Double Blind (Subject, Caregiver, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor), Primary Purpose:  Treatment"
=> "Allocation:  Random, Control:  Active Control, Endpoint Classification:  Safety Study, Intervention Model:  Parallel Assignment, Masking:  Double Blind (Subject, Caregiver, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor), Primary Purpose:  Treatment"
irb(main):140:0> str.match regex
=> #<MatchData "Allocation:  Random," 1:"Allocation:  Random," 2:"Allocation" 3:" Random,">
irb(main):141:0> $1
=> "Allocation:  Random,"
irb(main):142:0> $2
=> "Allocation"
irb(main):143:0> $3
=> " Random,"
irb(main):144:0> $4
=> nil
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted
irb(main):003:0> pp Hash[ *str.split(/\s*([^,]+:)\s+/)[1..-1] ]
{"Allocation:"=>"Random,",
 "Control:"=>"Active Control,",
 "Endpoint Classification:"=>"Safety Study,",
 "Intervention Model:"=>"Parallel Assignment,",
 "Masking:"=>
  "Double Blind (Subject, Caregiver, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor),",
 "Primary Purpose:"=>"Treatment"}

The whitespace parts of the regex aren't needed, but help to slightly clean up the output. I leave it to you to do followup minor cleanup, such as removing the colons from the end of the keys or trailing commas from the values.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice, elegant answer. –  vonconrad Jan 9 '11 at 3:56
    
Thanks for this. It seems to work, but I don't completely understand it. The method-call to split.(/\s*([^,]+:)\s+/), basically says "find the key and split off of it", right? If so, how/why does "split" then transfer the key into the array? Ok, so I think I learned something new about the split method. If I do str.split(/:/), I don't get the colons in the array. If I do str.split(/(:)/), I get the colons in the array??? Should this have been obvious? I ask b/c it doesn't seem obvious from the rdoc. –  user141146 Jan 9 '11 at 9:56
    
Yes, capturing groups are included in the results. By putting the \s* and \s+ outside the group, they are not included. Excerpted from ri String#split: "If pattern is a Regexp, str is divided where the pattern matches. Whenever the pattern matches a zero-length string, str is split into individual characters. If pattern contains groups, the respective matches will be returned in the array as well." –  Phrogz Jan 9 '11 at 14:57

After some trial and error, I managed to get the following to work on your example string and regex:

str.split(/((?:[^,]+?): (?:[^:]+?,(?![^\(]+?\))))+?/).delete_if(&:empty?).map{|s| s.strip.chomp(',')}

I had to add a lookahead to ensure that the commas inside any parenthesis would be ignored, as well as muting some of the groups. The delete_if and map at the end are purely cosmetic.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.