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struct bucket
{
   int nStrings;        //No. of Strings in a Bucket.
   char strings[MAXSTRINGS][MAXWORDLENGTH];     // A bucket row can contain maximum 9 strings of max string length 10.
};//buck[TOTBUCKETS];

void lexSorting(char array[][10], int lenArray, int symb)       //symb - symbol, sorting based on character symbols.
{
   int i, j;
   int bucketNo;
   int tBuckNStrings;
   bucket buck[TOTBUCKETS];

   for(i=0; i<lenArray; i++)
   {
      bucketNo = array[i][symb] - 'a';          // Find Bucket No. in which the string is to be placed.
      tBuckNStrings = buck[bucketNo].nStrings;  // temp variable for storing nStrings var in bucket structure.
      strcpy(buck[bucketNo].strings[tBuckNStrings],array[i]);   // Store the string in its bucket.
      buck[bucketNo].nStrings = ++tBuckNStrings;        //Increment the nStrings value of the bucket.
   }

//   lexSorting(array, lenArray, ++symb);

   printf("****** %d ******\n", symb);
   for(i=0; i<TOTBUCKETS; i++)
   {
      printf("%c = ", i+'a');
      for(j=0; j<buck[i].nStrings; j++)
         printf("%s ",buck[i].strings[j]);
      printf("\n");
   }
}

int main()
{
   char array[][10] = {"able","aback","a","abet","acid","yawn","yard","yarn","year","yoke"};
   int lenArray = 10;
   int i;

   printf("Strings: ");
   for(i=0; i<lenArray; i++)
      printf("%s ",array[i]);
   printf("\n");

   lexSorting(array, lenArray, 0);
}

Well here is the complete code, that I am trying. since its been a long time since i have touched upon C programming, so somewhere i am making mistake in structure declaration. The problem goes here:-

1) I have declared a structure above and its object as array(buck[]).

2) Now when I declare this object array along with the structure, it works fine.. I have commented this thing right now.

3) But when I declare this object array inside the function.. because ultimately i have to declare inside function( as i need to build a recursive program, where objects will be created in very recursive call) then the program is throwing segmentation fault.

Expected Output

> [others@centos htdocs]$ ./a.out
> Strings: able aback a abet acid yawn
> yard yarn year yoke
> ****** 0 ****** 
> a = able aback a abet acid 
> b = 
> c 
> .
> .
> y = yawn yard yarnyear yoke 
> z =

Actual Output

[others@centos htdocs]$ ./a.out
Strings: able aback a abet acid yawn yard yarn year yoke
Segmentation fault

I have no idea, what difference I made in this. Kindly help.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Please give more detail; it's impossible to answer without it. What does the code try to do? What is it actually doing? What have you done while trying to debug it? Where do you think the error is? Is this homework? –  templatetypedef Jan 9 '11 at 4:25
    
Can you at least tell us what isn't working? Compilers are designed to parse C programs and tell you what's wrong. I'm not nearly as good at that. –  Cody Gray Jan 9 '11 at 4:26
4  
66 questions asked, 29% accepted and this is how you post them? no thanks! –  SiegeX Jan 9 '11 at 4:27
1  
Oh, well then in that case, your problem must be with "the structure" inside "the function". Do you not know what your code is doing any better than that? Honestly, how much more generic can you get in describing a problem? Is it a secret what your functions are called and where precisely the error is occurring? –  Cody Gray Jan 9 '11 at 4:29
2  
AGeek, that edit is much better (code sample, expected behaviour and actual behaviour - enough to (relatively) easily figure out the problem). +1 and a reopen vote. Cheers. –  paxdiablo Jan 9 '11 at 4:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

What's wrong with your program is that it doesn't contain a main() function hence it won't link.

Beyond that, you should always do the following when asking questions here:

  • Provide a complete, minimal code sample that demonstrates the problem.
  • Detail the expected behaviour.
  • Detail the actual behaviour.

In fact, when I add the line:

int main (void) { return 0; }

it compiles and links fine.

That means it's almost certainly a run-time error you're experiencing hence we need the main() to figure out what you're doing wrong.

Using my psychic debugging skills, an important difference between declaring it at file scope and block scope is that the file-scope version will be initialised to zeros.

That means all the structure fields will be effectively zero (for the count) and empty strings (for the strings). With block scope, those counts and strings will be uninitialised.

The fact that you're using TOBUCKETS to print the structure out probably means you're trying to print out one of those uninitialised strings.

I think what's probably happening is that the nStrings field contains a garbage value when you start the processing. You should probably initialise it to zero manually (with a loop) and see if that fixes your problem. Put this after the declaration of buck in your sort function:

for (i = 0; i < TOTBUCKETS; i++)
    buck[i].nStrings = 0;

Right. It turns out that was the problem. When I fix up the errors in your latest code, I get the segmentation violation as well but, when I add that section above, it works fine:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

#define MAXSTRINGS 9
#define MAXWORDLENGTH 10
#define TOTBUCKETS 26

struct bucket
{
   int nStrings;        
   char strings[MAXSTRINGS][MAXWORDLENGTH];     
};

void lexSorting(char array[][10], int lenArray, int symb)       
{
   int i, j;
   int bucketNo;
   int tBuckNStrings;
   struct bucket buck[TOTBUCKETS];

   for(i=0; i<TOTBUCKETS; i++) buck[i].nStrings = 0;

   for(i=0; i<lenArray; i++)
   {
      bucketNo = array[i][symb] - 'a';          
      tBuckNStrings = buck[bucketNo].nStrings;  
      strcpy(buck[bucketNo].strings[tBuckNStrings],array[i]);   
      buck[bucketNo].nStrings = ++tBuckNStrings;        
   }

   printf("****** %d ******\n", symb);
   for(i=0; i<TOTBUCKETS; i++)
   {
      printf("%c = ", i+'a');
      for(j=0; j<buck[i].nStrings; j++)
         printf("%s ",buck[i].strings[j]);
      printf("\n");
   }
}

int main()
{
   char array[][10] = {"able","aback","a","abet","acid",
                       "yawn","yard","yarn","year","yoke"};
   int lenArray = 10;
   int i;

   printf("Strings: ");
   for(i=0; i<lenArray; i++)
      printf("%s ",array[i]);
   printf("\n");

   lexSorting(array, lenArray, 0);
}

The output of that was:

Strings: able aback a abet acid yawn yard yarn year yoke 
****** 0 ******
a = able aback a abet acid 
b = 
c = 
d = 
e = 
f = 
g = 
h = 
i = 
j = 
k = 
l = 
m = 
n = 
o = 
p = 
q = 
r = 
s = 
t = 
u = 
v = 
w = 
x = 
y = yawn yard yarn year yoke 
z = 
share|improve this answer
    
No. no.... i haven't posted the main() function... Infact, when i declare buck[] array along with structure, it works fine... –  AGeek Jan 9 '11 at 4:30
1  
I don't normally care for comments as answers, but this is perfect. :) –  GManNickG Jan 9 '11 at 4:30
    
But when i am declaring buck[] array inside the function.. it gives segmentation fault... I am not able to understand what is the difference that i have created b/w the two. –  AGeek Jan 9 '11 at 4:31
4  
@AGeek: That's the point, post it. We have no idea what can possibily be wrong with an incomplete program. What if I said "My car isn't working, here's a picture of it. What's wrong with it?" You wouldn't have a clue what to do, because you need to see the actual car. –  GManNickG Jan 9 '11 at 4:31
1  
@AGeek: Take a few minutes to define your actual problem like people are trying to force you to in comments. Then edit your original question and include all of those details. Post your full code, along with the exact compiler errors that you're getting when you try to run it. If you're really interested in an answer, you need to put a little more work into your questions. I suspect I'm not the only one that would vote to reopen and be willing to help you out. –  Cody Gray Jan 9 '11 at 4:32

keyword struct is not required when you create objects for it.

share|improve this answer
    
@AGeek Please edit your question and don't forget to tell us what errors do you get and what's your expected output –  Searock Jan 9 '11 at 4:32

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