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I'm using a for-loop similar to this one to truncate all filenames in a folder to 16 characters:

for i in *; do
    Shortname=${i:0:16}     # Let's assume I don't need the extension
    mv "$i" "$Shortname"
done

The problem is: Whenever two filenames have the same first 16 characters, the later one will overwrite the previous one (on OS X mv behaves that way).

How can I check if a file with the name "Shortname" already exists, and if so, replace the last character of "Shortname" with a number. Then check again if a file with that name exists, and if so, try a higher number. And so on. If it arrives at number 9 and so far all names have been taken, it should replace the last TWO characters of the "Shortname" with "10" and check if that file already exists.

Example: Let's say I have a directory with the following files in it:

MyTerriblyLongLongFirstFile.jpg
MyTerriblyLongLongSecondFile.jpg
MyTerriblyLongLongThirdFile.jpg
...
MyTerriblyLongLongFourteenthFile.jpg
...
MyTerriblyLongLongOneHundredSixtySeventhFile.jpg
...
MyTerriblyLongLongFiveMillionthFile.jpg

Note that the first 16 letters are the same for all files. After running the script, I would like them to be renamed to this:

MyTerriblyLongL1.jpg
MyTerriblyLongL2.jpg
MyTerriblyLongL3.jpg
...
MyTerriblyLong14.jpg
...
MyTerriblyLon167.jpg
...
MyTerribl5000000.jpg

It doesn't matter if "MyTerriblyLongLongFourteenthFile.jpg" is renamed to "MyTerriblyLong14.jpg", that depends on alphabetical sorting. It's just important that they each get a unique name.

What is the best way to do this?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try this on test files first. The usual method of testing by using echo instead of mv won't tell you much since the potential name collisions wouldn't be created.

#!/bin/bash
num=1
length=16
for file in M*.jpg
do
    newname=$file
    until [[ ! -f $newname ]]
    do
        (( sublen = length - ${#num} ))
        printf -v newname '%.*s%d' "$sublen" "$file" "$num"
        (( num++ ))
    done
    mv "$file" "$newname"
done

Testing:

$ touch MyTerriblyLongLongFilenames{a..k}.jpg
$ touch MyTerriblyLongL3
$ ls M*
MyTerriblyLongL3                  MyTerriblyLongLongFilenamesf.jpg
MyTerriblyLongLongFilenamesa.jpg  MyTerriblyLongLongFilenamesg.jpg
MyTerriblyLongLongFilenamesb.jpg  MyTerriblyLongLongFilenamesh.jpg
MyTerriblyLongLongFilenamesc.jpg  MyTerriblyLongLongFilenamesi.jpg
MyTerriblyLongLongFilenamesd.jpg  MyTerriblyLongLongFilenamesj.jpg
MyTerriblyLongLongFilenamese.jpg  MyTerriblyLongLongFilenamesk.jpg
$ ./nocollide
$ ls M*
MyTerriblyLong10  MyTerriblyLongL1  MyTerriblyLongL4  MyTerriblyLongL7
MyTerriblyLong11  MyTerriblyLongL2  MyTerriblyLongL5  MyTerriblyLongL8
MyTerriblyLong12  MyTerriblyLongL3  MyTerriblyLongL6  MyTerriblyLongL9
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You're the man. Thanks a lot! –  Martin Jan 10 '11 at 7:42

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