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If I need #element-one to be above #element-two, #element-two to be above #element-three, and #element-three to be above #element-one, is there any way to do this with CSS? Any other way?

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This is a very intriguing question. However, I am basically the answer is no, the could be a hack that does the trick a bit ;) Very interested to see a decent answer here. NOTE: in your sample you have 3 elements, that would mean the elements are rotated? and further: what CSS version do you want and is a javascript hack allowed? –  Caspar Kleijne Jan 9 '11 at 8:51
    
I don't think this can be done period. It would require a single element to have multiple z-index values. Very interesting question though I do think you will need to simulate the effect... Are you asking theoretically or do you have a requirement? If the latter could you pls post a mocked up version for inspection? Thanks! –  lnrbob Jan 9 '11 at 9:35
3  
CSS may be, at times, Byzantine, but I don't think it's up to the standards of creating an MC Escher page layout as yet. Not even with CSS 3. –  David Thomas Jan 9 '11 at 10:36
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't know any methods to do this in CSS or JavaScript..

I would split up one element into two parts, without it's noticed by user. (Actually this is not possible in every case, e.g. with text boxes, but it works well with images.)

So #element-one-part-A is above #element-two, #element-two is above #element-three, and #element-three is above #element-one-part-B. Technically it's not a z-index circle, but it looks like.

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It's impossible. z-index are like photoshop layer, the value is juste the position in the stack.

You can try cheating with some javascript ?

See this exemple with 4 elements

<html>
<body>
  <div id="container">
    <div id="e1" class="common">
      this is element 1
      this is element 1
      this is element 1
    </div>
    <div id="e2" class="common">
      this is element 2
      this is element 2
      this is element 2
    </div>
    <div id="e3" class="common">
      this is element 3
      this is element 3
      this is element 3
    </div>
    <div id="e4" class="common">
      this is element 4
      this is element 4
      this is element 4
    </div>
  </div>

  <style>
    html { font-size: 3em;}
    .common {
      position: absolute;
      overflow: hidden;
    }
    .clone {
      color: red;
      margin-top: -100%;
      background-color: rgba(200, 0, 100, .5) !important;
    }
    .window {
      overflow: hidden;
      width: 50%;
      height: 50%;
      position: absolute;
      bottom: 0;
      left: 0;
      background-color: rgba(0,0,0, .2);
    }
    #container {
      width: 600px;
      height: 600px;
      margin: auto;
      background: #eee;
      position: relative;
    }
    #e1 {
      background: yellow;
      color: orange;
      width: 100px;
      height: 500px;
      top: 50px;
      left: 100px;
    }
    #e2 {
      background: lightblue;
      color: blue;
      width: 500px;
      height: 100px;
      top: 100px;
      left: 50px;
    }
    #e3 {
      background: red;
      color: pink;
      width: 100px;
      height: 500px;
      bottom: 50px;
      right: 100px;
    }
    #e4 {
      background: lightgreen;
      color: green;
      width: 500px;
      height: 100px;
      bottom: 100px;
      right: 50px;
    }
  </style>
  <script>
    (function() {
      var clone = document.getElementById('e1').cloneNode(true);
      clone.className = 'common clone';

      var view = document.createElement('div');
      view.className = 'window';
      view.appendChild(clone);

      document.getElementById('container').appendChild(view);
    })();
  </script>
</body>
</html>
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That's z-index not x-index =) –  David Thomas Jan 9 '11 at 10:46
    
houps ! rectified ^^ –  Xavier Barbosa Jan 9 '11 at 11:49
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