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When I run git blame on a file (using msysgit) I always get the following sort of printout:

00000000 (Not Committed Yet 2011-01-09 11:21:30 +0200   1) package co
00000000 (Not Committed Yet 2011-01-09 11:21:30 +0200   2) {
00000000 (Not Committed Yet 2011-01-09 11:21:30 +0200   3)      impor
00000000 (Not Committed Yet 2011-01-09 11:21:30 +0200   4)      impor
00000000 (Not Committed Yet 2011-01-09 11:21:30 +0200   5)      impor
00000000 (Not Committed Yet 2011-01-09 11:21:30 +0200   6)      impor
00000000 (Not Committed Yet 2011-01-09 11:21:30 +0200   7)      impor

i.e. it shows all lines as Not Yet Committed.

I tried this on many files, that have many commits - always the same results. I also tried using relative/full path, but it seems to make no difference.

When I try to use TortoiseGit's blame it always shows every line as being last committed at the first commit:

alt text

even thought, as I've said, there are actually tens of commits in the history of these files..

Ideas?

Edit - More Info

  • Git blame works fine on GitHub, where this repo is hosted.
  • It also works fine if I clone it to a linux machine and do the blame there
  • It seems that only on msysgit this doesn't work
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For me this problem resulted from using a symlinked path as apposed to a path that the repository recognized, so it thought the file was completely new. –  Kzqai Jul 30 '12 at 20:16
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4 Answers

up vote 54 down vote accepted

git blame file.txt blames the version of file.txt in your working copy. If file.txt has Windows-newlines (CRLF) in the repo and you have core.autocrlf = true, then every line of file.txt will be considered different and will be reported by git blame as not yet committed.

The reason why git blame <my_branch> (or even better git blame HEAD, which works no matter what branch you're on) works, is that it doesn't blame the working copy version so there's no potential for lines not yet being committed.

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38  
git blame -w ignores the whitespace, so you can still blame against the working copy if desired –  Kyle Heironimus Jul 12 '12 at 13:32
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Found the solution - very weird.

If I run this:

git blame file.txt

The history is broken, as posted above.

If I do this instead:

git blame my_branch file.txt

It works!

This is very weird, because AFAICS the usage doesn't require a branch name:

$ git blame
usage: git blame [options] [rev-opts] [rev] [--] file
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5  
This works for me, thanks for posting it. You should mark this one as the answer IMO. –  wes Jan 24 '11 at 16:50
    
This works for me in msysgit but the filename is case-sensitive. So I can write git blame mybranch cmakelists.txt and it will fail; but if I write git blame mybranch CMakeLists.txt it will work. –  test Oct 21 '12 at 2:52
    
I agree, wes; blame was showing no history until I specified the branch, and that is inconsistent with the documentation. –  josephdpurcell Jul 9 '13 at 16:57
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Another possibility: case-sensitive filename typo

I had the same problem with git blame file.txt, then realized that I'd made a case-sensitive filename typo with file.txt

Changed it to File.txt (for example), and I got the expected results w/o having to specify my_branch: git blame File.txt

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Is this a path issue like in this thread?

I bet the message goes away if you say ...\Git\bin\git.exe, i.e. lower-case "bin".

Then I had a different problem, where "blame" was showing me "Not Committed Yet" as the user who did the commit.
For that problem, I don't know why, I changed Bin to bin, and the problem was fixed.
I should never have doubted you.

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nope. that's not it. –  Assaf Lavie Jan 9 '11 at 9:54
    
@Assaf: what msysgit version do you have, btw? –  VonC Jan 9 '11 at 9:56
    
$ git --version git version 1.7.3.1.msysgit.0 –  Assaf Lavie Jan 9 '11 at 10:08
    
@Assaf, if this is observed consistently on other repo that you clone, that could then be a bug report on the Git mailing list (since the bug tracker is off for now: code.google.com/p/msysgit/wiki/IssueTracker) –  VonC Jan 9 '11 at 10:10
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