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Being unable to locate a working php/javascript implementation of blowfish, I'm now considering using SHA1 hashing to implement web-based authentication, but the lack of knowledge in this particular field makes me unsure of whether the chosen method is secure enough.

The planned roadmap:

  1. User's password is stored on the server as an MD5 hash.
  2. Server issues a public key (MD5 hash of current time in milliseconds)
  3. Client javascript function takes user password as input, and calculates its MD5 hash
  4. Client then concatenates public key and password hash from above, and calculates SHA1 of the resulting string
  5. Client sends SHA1 hash to the server, where similar calculations are performed with public key and user's password MD5 hash
  6. Server compares the hashes, a match indicates successful authentication.
  7. A mismatch indicates authentication failure, and server issues a new public key, effectively expiring the one already used.

Now, the problematic part is about concatenating two keys before SHA1, could that be prone to some kind of statistical or other attacks?

Is there any specific order in which keys should be concatenated to improve the overall quality (i.e. higher bits being more important to reliability of encryption)?

Thank you in advance.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you're only using the 'public key' (which isn't actually a public key, it's a nonce, and should really be random, unless you really want it to be usable over a certain timeframe, in which case make sure you use HMAC with a secret key to generate it so an adversary cannot predict the nonce) to prevent replay attacks, and it's a fixed size, then concatenation might not be a problem.

That said, I'm a bit concerned that you might not have a well-thought-out security model. What attack is this trying to prevent, anyway? The user's password hash is unsalted, so a break of your password database will reveal plaintext passwords easily enough anyway, and although having a time-limited nonce will mitigate replay attacks from a passive sniffer, such a passive sniffer could just steal the user's session key anyway. Speaking of which, why not just use the session key as the nonce instead of a timestamp-based system?

But really, why not just use SSL? Cryptography is really hard to get right, and people much smarter than you or I have spent decades reviewing SSL's security to get it right.

Edit: If you're worried about MITM attacks, then nothing short of SSL will save you. Period. Mallory can just replace your super-secure login form with one that sends the password in plaintext to him. Game over. And even a passive attacker can see everything going over the wire - including your session cookie. Once Eve has the session cookie, she just injects it into her browser and is already logged in. Game over.

If you say you can't use SSL, you need to take a very hard look at exactly what you're trying to protect, and what kinds of attacks you will mitigate. You're going to probably need to implement a desktop application of some sort to do the cryptography - if MITMs are going around, then you cannot trust ANY of your HTML or Javascript - Mallory can replace them at will. Of course, your desktop app will need to implement key exchange, encryption and authentication on the data stream, plus authentication of the remote host - which is exactly what SSL does. And you'll probably use pretty much the same algorithms as SSL to do it, if you do it right.

If you decide MITMs aren't in scope, but you want to protect against passive attacks, you'll probably need to implement some serious cryptography in Javascript - we're talking about a Diffie-Hellman exchange to generate a session key that is never sent across the wire (HTML5 Web storage, etc), AES in Javascript to protect the key, etc. And at this point you've basically implemented half of SSL in Javascript, only chances are there are more bugs in it - not least of which is the problem that it's quite hard to get secure random numbers in Javascript.

Basically, you have the choice between:

  1. Not implementing any real cryptographic security (apparently not a choice, since you're implementing all these complex authentication protocols)
  2. Implementing something that looks an awful lot like SSL, only probably not as good
  3. Using SSL.

In short - if security matters, use SSL. If you don't have SSL, get it installed. Every platform that I know of that can run JS can also handle SSL, so there's really no excuse.

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Thank you for your reply. SSL is not an option I can control, the system in question is designed for use in client's environment that may not support SSL at all. The users' passwords are not salted, it is true, but we're for the moment evaluating the protection against man-in-the-middle attacks, I suppose. Now, how can a replay attack be used if the nonce is quite random and, by definition, is one-use only? –  Dennis Kreminsky Jan 9 '11 at 13:12
1  
If you're worried about MITM attacks, then nothing short of SSL will save you. Period. Mallory can just replace your super-secure login form with one that sends the password in plaintext to him. Game over. And even a passive attacker can see everything going over the wire - including your session cookie. Once Eve has the session cookie, she just injects it into her browser and is already logged in. –  bdonlan Jan 9 '11 at 13:15
    
As for the nonce, nonce prediction attacks aren't really relevant here - one would try to convince the user to log in with a nonce the attacker generates, using a known future timestamp. The user sends the hash to the attacker, who then waits until the timestamp comes around, then logs in using the user's authentication hash. However, any attack which allows for this would probably allow your login javascript to be replaced with evil code anyway. –  bdonlan Jan 9 '11 at 13:18
    
Thank you very much, I believe I see the point and will consider it more seriously. –  Dennis Kreminsky Jan 9 '11 at 14:10
    
+1 for "Cryptography is really hard to get right, and people much smarter than you or I have spent decades reviewing SSL's security to get it right." –  Marcus Downing Apr 7 '12 at 10:36

bdonlan is absolutely correct. As pointed out, an adversary only needs to replace your Javascript form with evil code, which will be trivial over HTTP. Then it's game over.

I would also suggest looking at moving your passwords to SHA-2 with salts, generated using a suitable cryptographic random number generator (i.e. NOT seeded using the server's clock). Also, perform the hash multiple times. See http://www.jasypt.org/howtoencryptuserpasswords.html sections 2 and 3.

MD5 is broken. Do not use MD5.

Your secure scheme needs to be similar to the following:

  1. Everything happens on SSL. The authentication form, the server-side script that verifies the form, the images, etc. Nothing fancy needs to be done here, because SSL does all the hard work for you. Just a simple HTML form that submits the username/password in "plaintext" is all that is really needed, since SSL will encrypt everything.

  2. User creates new password: you generate a random salt (NOT based off the server time, but from good crypto random source). Hash the salt + the new password many times, and store the salt & resulting hash in your database.

  3. Verify password: your script looks up salt for the user, and hashes the salt + entered password many times. Check for match in database.

The only thing that should be stored in your database is the salt and the hash/digest.

Assuming you have a database of MD5 hashes that you need to support, then the solution might be to add database columns for new SHA-2 hashes & salts. When the user logs in, you check against the MD5 hash as you have been doing. If it works, then follow the steps in "user creates new password" to convert it to SHA-2 & salt, and then delete the old MD5 hash. User won't know what happened.

Anything that really deviates from this is probably going to have some security flaws.

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