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I have the following Clojure code to calculate a number with a certain "factorable" property. (what exactly the code does is secondary).

(defn factor-9
  ([]
    (let [digits (take 9 (iterate #(inc %) 1))
          nums (map (fn [x] ,(Integer. (apply str x))) (permutations digits))]
      (some (fn [x] (and (factor-9 x) x)) nums)))
  ([n]
      (or
        (= 1 (count (str n)))
        (and (divisible-by-length n) (factor-9 (quot n 10))))))

Now, I'm into TCO and realize that Clojure can only provide tail-recursion if explicitly told so using the recur keyword. So I've rewritten the code to do that (replacing factor-9 with recur being the only difference):

(defn factor-9
  ([]
    (let [digits (take 9 (iterate #(inc %) 1))
          nums (map (fn [x] ,(Integer. (apply str x))) (permutations digits))]
      (some (fn [x] (and (factor-9 x) x)) nums)))
  ([n]
      (or
        (= 1 (count (str n)))
        (and (divisible-by-length n) (recur (quot n 10))))))

To my knowledge, TCO has a double benefit. The first one is that it does not use the stack as heavily as a non tail-recursive call and thus does not blow it on larger recursions. The second, I think is that consequently it's faster since it can be converted to a loop.

Now, I've made a very rough benchmark and have not seen any difference between the two implementations although. Am I wrong in my second assumption or does this have something to do with running on the JVM (which does not have automatic TCO) and recur using a trick to achieve it?

Thank you.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The use of recur does speed things up, but only by about 3 nanoseconds (really) over a recursive call. When things get that small they can be hidden in the noise of the rest of the test. I wrote four tests (link below) that are able to illustrate the difference in performance.

I'd also suggest using something like criterium when benchmarking. (Stack Overflow won't let me post with more than 1 link since I've got no reputation to speak of, so you'll have to google it, maybe "clojure criterium")

For formatting reasons, I've put the tests and results in this gist.

Briefly, to compare relatively, if the recursive test is 1, then the looping test is about 0.45, and the TCO tests about 0.87 and the absolute difference between the recursive and TCO tests are around 3ns.

Of course, all the caveats about benchmarking apply.

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That's interesting, I've set up criterium to measure factor-9 and got that the TCO version is actually somewhat slower than the non-optimized version. See gist.github.com/773060. –  Balint Erdi Jan 10 '11 at 17:08
    
Surprisingly (to me at least :) ) there is a world of difference when comparing the two versions for a simple Fibonacci calculation: gist.github.com/773068 –  Balint Erdi Jan 10 '11 at 17:10
    
That is rather dramatic, isn't it? Joys of benchmarks. At least you have a convincing argument that TCO makes a big difference :-) –  hutch Jan 10 '11 at 21:41
    
Hang on! While dramatically different, they aren't the same algorithm. If you replace the 'recur' with 'fib' in fibo-toc, you get something a whole lot closer in performance. The recursive version ~1.37us, the TCO version ~1.32us. Like I said… the joys of benchmarking :-) –  hutch Jan 10 '11 at 22:03
1  
Yes, that's right. The problem that I was, poorly, pointing out is that your fibo and fibo-toc implement two very different algorithms. By copying the whole function fibo-toc to, say, fibo2 then replacing recur with fibo2 (in fibo2), then fibo2 is no longer a tail call but the difference in algorithm between the fibo-toc and fibo2 is minimised. This makes them more comparable -- the only real difference is now the tail call optimisation. And when using Criterium, the difference in performance is more in line with the results in the gist I first posted. –  hutch Jan 13 '11 at 18:45

After evaluating factor-9 (quot n 10) an and and an or has to be evaluated before the function can return. Thus it is not tail-recursive.

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Unless and and or act differently in clojure than in other lisps (which I doubt), that's not true. (and x y) should be equivalent to (if x y false) and (or x y) to (if x true y), so y is in a tail position in both cases. –  sepp2k Jan 9 '11 at 13:35
    
@sepp2k That means the program can be converted into an equivalent tail-recursive one. But does that make the program itself tail-recursive? If so, how can I vote down my answer? –  Oswald Jan 9 '11 at 14:08
    
Since macro-expansion happens at compile-time and after macro-expansion you have a tail-recursive program, yes it makes the program tail-recursive. Also: if you use recur in a position that is not the tail, you actually get an error. You can't downvote your answer, but you can delete it by clicking the link "delete" that's between your answer's body and the comments. –  sepp2k Jan 9 '11 at 14:16

When optimizing any code, it's good to start from potential or actual bottlenecks and optimize that first.

It seems to me that this particular piece of code is eating most of your CPU time:

 (map (fn [x] ,(Integer. (apply str x))) (permutations digits))

And that doesn't depend on TCO in any way - it is executed in same way. So, tail call in this particular example will allow you not to use up all the stack, but to achieve better performance, try optimizing this.

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I don't think the answer is correct. First, permutations gives a lazy seq so that the evaluation of (some ...) will trigger permutation calculation only as needed. Second, depending on the runtime behaviour of factor-9 this might be relevant or not. On the other side you general advice about analyzing what to optimize is correct. If the function factor-9 is the bottleneck, the question to TCO or not is only matter of stack size, nor runtime performance. –  ordnungswidrig Jan 9 '11 at 16:21
    
@ordnungswidrig: Quite possible. Being unable to run the code, I just picked the most suspicious piece. I'll wait for feedback from Balint and then edit it as necessary. The advice about identifying bottlenecks is applicable for any code optimization problem. –  Goran Jovic Jan 9 '11 at 16:42
    
Goran, I think ordnungswidrig is correct, permutations will get fetched as needed, but do you know of a profiler will clojure I can check this assumption with? –  Balint Erdi Jan 13 '11 at 8:46

just a gentile reminder that clojure has no TCO

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The JVM which Clojure runs on does not have automatic TCO but it can be tricked into doing it for self-recursion and when being explicit about it with recur –  Balint Erdi Jan 10 '11 at 17:12
    
no it has a looping construct called recur. it syntactically resembles a tail call though it is not because it can be used for both loops and functions. –  Arthur Ulfeldt Jan 10 '11 at 18:30
    
+1 for being the only person to point this out. I'd also add that the discussions here are specific to the subset of tail calls that Clojure's recur can handle and are not applicable to tail call optimization in general. –  Jon Harrop Apr 14 '12 at 10:08

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