Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am practicing how to find and remove dead code. I have the following code:

              int c1 = Integer.parseInt(args[0]) ;
           int c2 = Integer.parseInt(args[1]) ;
           int c3 = Integer.parseInt(args[2]) ;

/*  1 */           c1 += 7 ; 
/*  2 */           System.out.println( c1 ) ; 

/*  3 */       while (c1 % 8 != 0)
/*  4 */              if ( c1 % 16 == 0 ) ; 
/*  5 */              else
/*  6 */         do 
/*  7 */                 {
/*  8 */                    c1 += 7 ; 
/*  9 */                    System.out.println( c1 ) ; 
/* 10 */                    if ( c2 < c3 )
/* 11 */                       { c1 = c1+c1 ; 
/* 12 */                         c3 ++ ; 
/* 13 */                         c1 /= 2 ; 
/* 14 */                         c3 -= 1 ; 
/* 15 */                       }
/* 16 */                 }
/* 17 */                 while ( c1 % 8 != 0 ) ;

/* 18 */           c1 += 7 ; 
/* 19 */           System.out.println( c1 ) ; 
        }     

My oppinion on this code: first the if statement can be removed, because it does not effect the execution of the rest of the code. Besides c1%16 is the same as c1%8.

How do I handle the loops?

share|improve this question
    
This code is scary, where did it come from? Who wrote it. –  jzd Jan 9 '11 at 14:38
    
the intention is to confuse the reader, an assistant professor wrote it... –  artworkad シ Jan 9 '11 at 14:40
    
check my answer please :). –  Mihai Claudiu Toader Jan 9 '11 at 15:19
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would start from the inner code of the loop: For example inside the inner if you have

c1 = c1+c1 ; 
c3 ++ ; 
c1 /= 2 ; 
c3 -= 1 ; 

the first and third line cancel each other .. and the same with the second and fourth. Removing those you get the inner if like this:

if ( c2 < c3 )
{
}

which can be eliminated (also removing the need for c2, c3 vars) thus making the enclosing statement look like this:

do 
{
  c1 += 7 ; 
  System.out.println( c1 ) ; 
}
while ( c1 % 8 != 0 );

If we go a step up and reverse the enclosing if/else we get something like this:

if ( c1 % 16 != 0 )
    do 
    {
      c1 += 7 ; 
      System.out.println( c1 ) ; 
    }
    while ( c1 % 8 != 0 );
else 
 ;

and the empty else can be removed. Now if you another step up you get:

while (c1 % 8 != 0)
  if ( c1 % 16 != 0 )
    do 
    {
      c1 += 7 ; 
      System.out.println( c1 ) ; 
    }
    while ( c1 % 8 != 0 );

An you remove the if completely since it's already checked in the while above. Now if you write the complete code you get:

c1 += 7 ; 
System.out.println( c1 ) ; 

while (c1 % 8 != 0)
  do 
  {
    c1 += 7 ; 
    System.out.println( c1 ) ; 
  }
  while ( c1 % 8 != 0 );

c1 += 7 ; 
System.out.println( c1 ) ; 

you can remove the first while and the initial add/print altogether because the first do loop will have the same semantics.

In the end you should obtain something like this:

    do {
        c1 += 7;
        System.out.println(c1);
    }
    while (c1 % 8 != 0);

    c1 += 7;
    System.out.println(c1);

And if you don't need to actually print the intermediate values you can obtain the final c1 value via simple mathematics in 1-2 steps :-).

share|improve this answer
    
I think you did something wrong, the if statement has an empty body so the while is wrapped by the else –  artworkad シ Jan 9 '11 at 15:26
    
Nope. The standard spec for if is if '(' expression ')' <statement> (else <statement>) and ';' is defined as an empty statement. for example "if (false) ; else System.out.println(\"x\");" will print "x". –  Mihai Claudiu Toader Jan 9 '11 at 15:28
    
I have a if ( c1 % 16 == 0 ) ; , ";" indicates that the statement is empty? –  artworkad シ Jan 9 '11 at 15:30
    
ahhhh yes I missed that == changed to != sorry –  artworkad シ Jan 9 '11 at 15:31
    
And the output from the original code and the final code matches for each c1 from 1 to 1000 :). –  Mihai Claudiu Toader Jan 9 '11 at 15:35
show 5 more comments

c%16 is NOT the same as c%8. If c were equal to 24, the former returns 8 and the latter 0. If c were 32 they would both be 0, but if c were 40, the former again returns 8 and the latter 0.

Lines 4/5/6 are not optimal. What is really going on is if c1%16 != 0, do the do/while loop, but the way it is written is cloogy. It is written, 'do nothing if c1%16 == 0, else do the loop', using the naked ; after the if. I would make it more readable by doing something like:

bool shouldDoLoop = c1 % 16 != 0;
if (shouldDoLoop) {
   // do/while here
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think the while on line 17 is from a do - while loop, isn't it? –  theomega Jan 9 '11 at 14:34
    
@theomega your are right. thank you. –  hvgotcodes Jan 9 '11 at 14:35
    
I think the first while wrappes the do-while, what to you think? –  artworkad シ Jan 9 '11 at 14:40
    
@artworkad, lol, i think you are right. this is why it is important to make it readable the first time ;). I updated my answer, leaving line 3 alone and focusing just on the if/else/do lines. –  hvgotcodes Jan 9 '11 at 14:43
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.