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I want to find the subsets of a set of integers. it is the first step of "Sum of Subsets" algorithm with backtracking. I have written the following code, but it doesn't return the correct answer:

code:

BTSum(0, nums);
///**************
ArrayList<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>();

public static ArrayList<Integer> BTSum(int n, ArrayList<Integer> numbers) {
    if (n == numbers.size()) {
        for (Integer integer : list) {
            System.out.print(integer+", ");
        }
        System.out.println("********************");
        list.removeAll(list);
        System.out.println();
    } else {
        for (int i = n; i < numbers.size(); i++) {
            if (i == numbers.size() - 1) {
                list.add(numbers.get(i));
                BTSum(i + 1, numbers);
            } else {
                list.add(numbers.get(i));
                for (int j = i+1; j < numbers.size(); j++)
                BTSum(j, numbers);
            }
        }
    }

    return null;
}

for example if I want to calculate the subsets of set = {1, 3, 5} The result of my method is :

 1, 3, 5, ********************

 5, ********************

 3, 5, ********************

 5, ********************

 3, 5, ********************

 5, ********************

I want it to produce

1, 3, 5 
1, 5
3, 5
5

I think the problem is from the part list.removeAll(list); but I dont know how to correct it.

share|improve this question
7  
That's one of the least readable sources I saw in my life! – Nikita Rybak Jan 9 '11 at 15:44
3  
2  
Is it a homework? If it is, search SO, your classmates has already asked. Invest sometime in debugging. – Nishant Jan 9 '11 at 15:45
1  
What is the expected output? – diagonalbatman Jan 9 '11 at 15:45
3  
shoudnt the output contain also 1,3 and 1 and 3? – phimuemue Jan 9 '11 at 15:52

10 Answers 10

up vote 47 down vote accepted

What you want is called a Powerset. Here is a simple implementation of it:

public static Set<Set<Integer>> powerSet(Set<Integer> originalSet) {
        Set<Set<Integer>> sets = new HashSet<Set<Integer>>();
        if (originalSet.isEmpty()) {
            sets.add(new HashSet<Integer>());
            return sets;
        }
        List<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>(originalSet);
        Integer head = list.get(0);
        Set<Integer> rest = new HashSet<Integer>(list.subList(1, list.size()));
        for (Set<Integer> set : powerSet(rest)) {
            Set<Integer> newSet = new HashSet<Integer>();
            newSet.add(head);
            newSet.addAll(set);
            sets.add(newSet);
            sets.add(set);
        }
        return sets;
    }

I will give you an example to explain how the algorithm works for the powerset of {1, 2, 3}:

  • Remove {1}, and execute powerset for {2, 3};
    • Remove {2}, and execute powerset for {3};
      • Remove {3}, and execute powerset for {};
        • Powerset of {} is {{}};
      • Powerset of {3} is 3 combined with {{}} = { {}, {3} };
    • Powerset of {2, 3} is {2} combined with { {}, {3} } = { {}, {3}, {2}, {2, 3} };
  • Powerset of {1, 2, 3} is {1} combined with { {}, {3}, {2}, {2, 3} } = { {}, {3}, {2}, {2, 3}, {1}, {3, 1}, {2, 1}, {2, 3, 1} }.
share|improve this answer
    
Is this 2^n time complexity? – user3335040 Sep 2 '14 at 21:40
    
@user3335040, yes, it is, since you always need to generate 2^n sets. – João Silva Jan 13 '15 at 15:58

Just a primer how you could solve the problem:

Approach 1

  • Take the first element of your number list
  • generate all subsets from the remaining number list (i.e. the number list without the chosen one) => Recursion!
  • for every subset found in the previous step, add the subset itself and the subset joined with the element chosen in step 1 to the output.

Of course, you have to check the base case, i.e. if your number list is empty.

Approach 2

It is a well known fact that a set with n elements has 2^n subsets. Thus, you can count in binary from 0 to 2^n and interpret the binary number as the corresponding subset. Note that this approach requires a binary number with a sufficient amount of digits to represent the whole set.

It should be a not too big problem to convert one of the two approaches into code.

share|improve this answer
    
Approach 2 is really good ... – Aram Arabyan 17 hours ago

Your code is really confusing and there is no explanation.

You can do iteratively with a bitmask that determines which numbers are in the set. Each number from 0 to 2^n gives a unique subset in its binary representation, for example

for n = 3:

i = 5 -> 101 in binary, choose first and last elements i = 7 -> 111 in binary, choose first 3 elements

Suppose there are n elements (n < 64, after all if n is larger than 64 you'll run that forever).

for(long i = 0; i < (1<<n); i++){
    ArrayList<Integer> subset = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    for(int j = 0; j < n; j++){
        if((i>>j) & 1) == 1){ // bit j is on
            subset.add(numbers.get(j));
        }
    }
    // print subset
}
share|improve this answer
    
Could you elaborate on f((i>>j) & 1) == 1). I understand you are shifting i bits right, adding j zeros to i's binary representation. I also understand the bit wise & is comparing i >>j to 1 and seeing if all bits are on between i >> j and 1. But I just don't understand why this operation is the knowledgete that its time to add a subset – Brian Ogden Oct 26 '15 at 0:41
    
@BrianOgden (i>>j)&1==1 is just testing if the j-th bit in i is set. The j-th bit in the number corresponds to whether the subset contains the j-th object. And i is looping for 0 to 2<sup>n</sup>-1. – Michael Anderson Oct 26 '15 at 1:57
    
Thanks @MichaelAnderson, that helps somewhat, but why does the j-th bit correspond to the subset containing the j-th object? – Brian Ogden Oct 26 '15 at 2:07
    
Not the subset containing the j-th object - as there may be more than one. The i-th subset contains the j-th object if the j-th bit in i is set. I put a more complete explanation as an answer to your separate question (stackoverflow.com/questions/33337317/…) – Michael Anderson Oct 26 '15 at 2:09

Considering a Noob Visitor (thanks to google) to this question - like me
Here is a recursive solution which works on simple principal :

Set = {a,b,c,d,e}
then we can break it to {a} + Subset of {b,c,d,e}

public class Powerset{
     String str = "abcd"; //our string
     public static void main(String []args){
        Powerset ps = new Powerset();
        for(int i = 0; i< ps.str.length();i++){ //traverse through all characters
            ps.subs("",i);
        }
     }

     void subs(String substr,int index)
     {
         String s = ""+str.charAt(index); //very important, create a variable on each stack
         s = substr+s; //append the subset so far
         System.out.println(s); //print

         for(int i=index+1;i<str.length();i++)
           subs(s,i); //call recursively

     }
}

OUTPUT

a
ab
abc
abcd
abd
ac
acd
ad
b
bc
bcd
bd
c
cd
d
share|improve this answer
3  
Simple and elegant solution to implement +1 – Luke Taylor Jan 6 '15 at 17:54
1  
Love this solution - With out a doubt this is the way to go, Thanks for this , Noob if i understand correctly the way to think why this recursion works is : We start with a,b,c,d as the smallest subsets Then when we want to look at each bigger subset we say a->ab,ac,ad Then b->bc,bd (Not ab because we already had it) and so on, thats why advancing the index is the proper way. Thanks again – shimi_tap Feb 2 at 20:29
    
yup....i code it under the logic that "ab" gets stored in recursion stack, then use that and append "c" to it...so "abc" is output on new recursion stack.print it and go on appending! :) – NoobEditor Feb 3 at 3:41
private static void findSubsets(int array[])
{
  int numOfSubsets = 1 << array.length; 

  for(int i = 0; i < numOfSubsets; i++)
 {
    int pos = array.length - 1;
   int bitmask = i;

   System.out.print("{");
   while(bitmask > 0)
   {
    if((bitmask & 1) == 1)
     System.out.print(array[pos]+",");
    bitmask >>= 1;
    pos--;
   }
   System.out.print("}");
 }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
How it works? .... – Richard Oct 2 '13 at 14:38

I was actually trying to solve this one and got the algorithm @phimuemue on the previous post .Here is what I implemented. Hope this works.

/**
*@Sherin Syriac
*
*/

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class SubSet {
    ArrayList<List<Integer>> allSubset = new ArrayList<List<Integer>>();

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SubSet subSet = new SubSet();
        ArrayList<Integer> set = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        set.add(1);
        set.add(2);
        set.add(3);
        set.add(4);
        subSet.getSubSet(set, 0);
        for (List<Integer> list : subSet.allSubset) {
            System.out.print("{");
            for (Integer element : list) {
                System.out.print(element);
            }
            System.out.println("}");
        }

    }

    public void getSubSet(ArrayList<Integer> set, int index) {
        if (set.size() == index) {
            ArrayList<Integer> temp = new ArrayList<Integer>();
            allSubset.add(temp);
        } else {
            getSubSet(set, index + 1);
            ArrayList<List<Integer>> tempAllSubsets = new ArrayList<List<Integer>>();
            for (List subset : allSubset) {
                ArrayList<Integer> newList = new ArrayList<Integer>();
                newList.addAll(subset);
                newList.add(set.get(index));
                tempAllSubsets.add(newList);
            }

            allSubset.addAll(tempAllSubsets);
        }

    }

}
share|improve this answer
// subsets for the set of 5,9,8

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class Subset {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
    List<Integer> s = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    s.add(9);
    s.add(5);
    s.add(8);
    int setSize = s.size();
    int finalValue = (int) (Math.pow(2, setSize));
    String bValue = "";
    for (int i = 0; i < finalValue; i++) {
        bValue = Integer.toBinaryString(i);
        int bValueSize = bValue.length();
        for (int k = 0; k < (setSize - bValueSize); k++) {
            bValue = "0" + bValue;
        }
        System.out.print("{ ");
        for (int j = 0; j < setSize; j++) {
            if (bValue.charAt(j) == '1') {
                System.out.print((s.get(j)) + " ");
            }
        }
        System.out.print("} ");
    }
}
}


//Output : { } { 8 } { 5 } { 5 8 } { 9 } { 9 8 } { 9 5 } { 9 5 8 } 
share|improve this answer

Based on what I learnt today, here is the Java Solution It is based on recursion

public class Powerset {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        final List<List<String>> allSubsets = powerSet(Arrays.asList(1, 2, 3, 4), 0);
        for (List<String> subsets : allSubsets) {
            System.out.println(subsets);
        }
    }

    private static List<List<String>> powerSet(final List<Integer> values,
                                               int index) {
        if (index == values.size()) {
            return new ArrayList<>();
        }
        int val = values.get(index);
        List<List<String>> subset = powerSet(values, index + 1);
        List<List<String>> returnList = new ArrayList<>();
        returnList.add(Arrays.asList(String.valueOf(val)));
        returnList.addAll(subset);
        for (final List<String> subsetValues : subset) {
            for (final String subsetValue : subsetValues) {
                returnList.add(Arrays.asList(val + "," + subsetValue));
            }
        }
        return returnList;
    }
}

Running it will give results as

[1]
[2]
[3]
[4]
[3,4]
[2,3]
[2,4]
[2,3,4]
[1,2]
[1,3]
[1,4]
[1,3,4]
[1,2,3]
[1,2,4]
[1,2,3,4]
share|improve this answer

Here's some pseudocode. You can cut same recursive calls by storing the values for each call as you go and before recursive call checking if the call value is already present.

The following algorithm will have all the subsets excluding the empty set.

list * subsets(string s, list * v){
    if(s.length() == 1){
        list.add(s);    
        return v;
    }
    else
    {
        list * temp = subsets(s[1 to length-1], v);     
        int length = temp->size();

        for(int i=0;i<length;i++){
            temp.add(s[0]+temp[i]);
        }

        list.add(s[0]);
        return temp;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
public static ArrayList<ArrayList<Integer>> powerSet(List<Integer> intList) {

    ArrayList<ArrayList<Integer>> result = new ArrayList<ArrayList<Integer>>();
    result.add(new ArrayList<Integer>());

    for (int i : intList) {
        ArrayList<ArrayList<Integer>> temp = new ArrayList<ArrayList<Integer>>();

        for (ArrayList<Integer> innerList : result) {
            innerList = new ArrayList<Integer>(innerList);
            innerList.add(i);
            temp.add(innerList);
        }
        result.addAll(temp);
    }

    return result;
}
share|improve this answer

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