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I am working on a new PHP framework for personal use in future projects, and below is my planned file structure so far. I just need some help with some regex for my .htaccess file and some help for how I can load the files I want.

Basically, any "folder" after the domain should load from my "module" folder. I would like to have it load www.domain.com/account/ from www.domain.com/module/account/. I also want it in that format for any other folder I have under modules. All folders/files under "module" should load as if it were in the top level.

In this example though in my module/account/ folder, if I have a file called home.php then I should be able to access it with www.domain.com/account/home instead of www.domain.com/module/account/home.php, and www.domain.com/module/user/register.php would actually be accessed by www.domain.com/user/register

I hope this makes sense and appreciate any help and any advice. I mainly need help with the .htaccess file to make this folder structure work. I have not decided if all files should be accessed though a single index file or if I should just include a bootstrap type file into every page. The bootstrap file would set up all variables, config options, as well as auto load all class files and create objects needed.

myFramework/
--/assets/
--------/css/
--------/images/
--------/javascript/
--/includes/
---------/classes/
---------/config/
---------/language/
---------/header.php
---------/footer.php
--/module/
--------/account/
----------------/create.php
----------------/login.php
----------------/logout.php
----------------/settings.php
----------------/editprofile.php
--------/admin/
--------/blog/
--------/forums/
--------/messages/
--------/users/
--index.php
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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+25

The answer from jasonbar is actually almost there. All it lacks is dealing with the .php extension as you described:

RewriteEngine On
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/module
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} [.]php$
RewriteRule (.*)[.]php$ /module/$1

That being said, I'd strongly encourage you to consider a front controller paradigm (as you eluded to in your problem description) as doing so allows for much greater control, encourages an MVC approach, etc. =o)

EDIT:

I corrected a few neglected points and added proper processing of the PHP extension. Note that the [L] argument at the end causes further processing to cease, making these code blocks useful as logical structures within your .htaccess file (i.e. by preventing any processing that follows); remove that argument if such functionality is not desired.

I've also added a line to specifically check that the php file being requested actually exists.

RewriteEngine On

# if the uri matches a directory in the module dir, redirect to that. Disable 
# this block if you don't wish to have either directory browsing or to have the 
# default apache file load.
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{DOCUMENT_ROOT}/module%{REQUEST_URI} -d
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/includes
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/assets
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/module
RewriteRule (.*) /module/$1 [L]

# if the uri matches a file sans the .php extension in the module directory, 
# then redirect to that.
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{DOCUMENT_ROOT}/module%{REQUEST_URI}.php -f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/includes
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/assets
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/module
RewriteRule (.*) /module/$1.php [L]

EDIT:

To also allow files that end in ".php" to be served from the module directory, add the following to your .htaccess file:

# if the uri matches a file with the .php extension in the module directory, 
# then redirect to that.
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{DOCUMENT_ROOT}/module%{REQUEST_URI} -f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/includes
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/assets
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/module
# note that the following line restricts access to php files only. comment out 
# the following line to allow any existing file under module director to be 
# accessed (or modify the following to allow other file extensions to be read)
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} [.]php$  
RewriteRule (.*) /module/$1 [L]
share|improve this answer
    
Hello I keep trying both your example and jasonbar's example and I can't get any of it to work, I have verified with different test that mod rewrite is enabled. DO you have any suggestions? –  jasondavis Jan 16 '11 at 0:26
    
@jasondavis - What do you mean it doesn't work? Please post results from your rewrite log with RewriteLogLevel 9 and RewriteLog /var/log/apache2/rewrite.log in your config file. What behavior are you seeing? Please post a test case so we can replicate. Thanks. –  jmort253 Jan 16 '11 at 23:22
    
This solution doesn't allow the index.php to be accessed, the folders and files outside of /module, like the /includes folder for example, and it doesn't allow the .php extension to be left off. –  jmort253 Jan 17 '11 at 0:01
    
Ah - yes - I missed a step. My solution actually does allow the extension to be left of, but you are correct to point out that the base folders need to be excluded. I'm refining my response now - thanks! –  emanaton Jan 18 '11 at 20:07
    
@emanaton - You're close! 127.0.0.1 - - [18/Jan/2011:21:51:57 --0800] [local.sandbox.com/sid#21850340][rid#21a76440/initial] (4) RewriteCond: input='/srv/www/local.sandbox.com/module/account/home.php.php' pattern='-f' => not-matched Note the two .php's in that RewriteCond from my rewrite.log from local.sandbox.com/account/home.php URL. Note: I originally voted your answer down. If you get this fixed, I'll remove the downvote and then also upvote you :) –  jmort253 Jan 19 '11 at 5:53

I'd try to solve this in PHP itself, if it were up to me. Just create a .htaccess file that maps every possible request to a single file (probably index.php), and determine what to do from there. That gives you an opportunity to do all kinds of bootstrapping and logging before delegating the request to whatever piece of code should handle that request. You could even include and use a micro framework such as Limonade to accomplish what you want. Here's an example:

RewriteEngine On
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d # if the requested directory does not exist,
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f # and the requested file does not exist,
RewriteRule ^ index.php             # map everything to index.php. 

Then, in index.php, you can do a wide variety of things to make sure you get the correct response. The simplest way to use a "controller like structure", would be to include a framework such as Limonade, and use it. An example:

<?php
require_once 'vendor/limonade.php';

dispatch( 'account/home', 'accountHome' );

function accountHome( ) {
    require_once 'modules/account/home.php';
}

run( );

Obviously, that is just a suggestion. Alternatively, you could just make use of an even simpler system, although I guess you'd have to write that yourself. That way you can say, if the file exists in the modules directory, just include this file, and that's that.

<?php
$path = isset( $_SERVER['PATH_INFO'] ) ? trim( $_SERVER['PATH_INFO'], '/' ) : null;
if( $path !== null ) {
    $filename = 'module/' . $path . '.php'; /** $path could be account/home */
    if( file_exists( $filename ) ) {
        require_once $filename;
    }
    else {
        require_once 'error.php';
    }
}
else {
    require_once 'home.php';
}

That's it. Fully functional and all. You could benefit from using a library that sorts this all out for you though.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks when I get more time I am going to look into this, I really wanted to avoid routing everything through 1 file like this but it might be a better option –  jasondavis Jan 17 '11 at 23:06
    
Wouldn't you also be able to use the rewrite log for logging and rely on the LAMP stack? –  jmort253 Jan 18 '11 at 0:35

After reading your requirements, I have come up with the following solution:

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/includes
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/assets
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/module
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/index\.php
RewriteRule (.*)(\.php)?$ /module/$1

I have verified this works with the following URL patterns using Apache 2.2:

Redirects to module folder:

http://local.sandbox.com/account/home.php?t=t
http://local.sandbox.com/account/home.php
http://local.sandbox.com/account/home.php/?t=t
http://local.sandbox.com/account/home?t=t
http://local.sandbox.com/account/home/?t=t
http://local.sandbox.com/account/home/
http://local.sandbox.com/account/home
http://local.sandbox.com/user/register
http://local.sandbox.com/user/register.php
http://local.sandbox.com/user/register?t=t
http://local.sandbox.com/user/register.php?t=t

Doesn't redirect as these URI's are excluded:

http://local.sandbox.com/includes/header.php
http://local.sandbox.com/includes/header.php?t=t
http://local.sandbox.com/index.php?t=t
http://local.sandbox.com/?t=t

Note that the RewriteCondition is essentially an AND consisting of NOT conditions, so any folder or file that you want to exclude from the rewrite rule must be added as a NOT condition.

The module rule is inclusive, meaning that any new folders you place in the module folder will automatically be subject to your rewrite requirements.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks this is helpful –  jasondavis Jan 18 '11 at 11:03
    
This isn't quite it; the rewrite rule here strips the .php extension and redirects process to the module directory without it. It is a quick of the settings for your apache setup that allows this config to serve your files. –  emanaton Jan 18 '11 at 20:30
    
@emanaton - Do you have a link referring to the Apache quirk? I'm interested to learn more about this. Thanks for pointing it out. –  jmort253 Jan 19 '11 at 2:15

If I understand you, this should work. The conditions will cause it to redirect only when the requested resource isn't a real file / directory and when it isn't already requested from the module directory.

RewriteEngine On
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/module
RewriteRule (.*) /module/$1
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the reply, I tried this out but it seems to not work, any other ideas? Thanks –  jasondavis Jan 10 '11 at 19:40

I'm developing a PHP framework with a collegue so this really caught my attention.

Our .htaccess makes a minimal amount of assumptions. It looks like this:

DirectoryIndex index.php
RewriteEngine on
RewriteBase /

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} \.png$
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ $1  [QSA,L]

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} \.gif$
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ $1  [QSA,L]

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} \.jpg$
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ $1  [QSA,L]

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} \.js$
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ $1  [QSA,L]

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} \.pdf$
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ $1  [QSA,L]

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} \.css$
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ $1  [QSA,L]

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} ^/favicon*
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ favicon.ico [QSA,L]

#RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
#RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d

RewriteRule ^(.*)$ index.php?$1 [QSA,L]

index.php in turn, looks like this:

<?php

namespace System;

try
{
        ob_start();

        $Indium = include 'src/bootstrap/IndiumFactory.php';
        $Indium->run();
}
catch (\Exception $e) // catch errors and display/log
{
        Error::indium_exception_handler($e);
        Error::render_error_page();
}

IndiumFactory is the bootstrapper which sets up the environment. Indium is the name of our framework. IndiumFactory is autogenerated from a set of config files.

Maybe I should clarify that Indium has a mechanism for loading and calling the correct controller class with the rest of REQUEST_URI as the arguments. Our forms rely on POST:ed data, so we can impose rather strict rules/filters on the URI.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you expalin what all the image type files is doing in your htaccess? I have almost talked myself into doing something similar to what you are doing (in a different way) but basicly instead of including a php file for a section, it would call a class/methods for a section based on the uri. I am now stuck on trying to figure out how I can handle things such as paging though or in my app a user has a user ID number so to view for example a blog of another user,...continued in next comment –  jasondavis Jan 18 '11 at 21:07
    
.... I will need to have there user ID in the uri as well for paging, there will be a page number. Any ideas how I can get the number from the uri and put it to use? I was thinking of just checking my uri for the existence of a number but that won't work since some numbers will be for a user id, blog id, forum topic id, paging –  jasondavis Jan 18 '11 at 21:07
    
It's just the way our framework is set up. We don't let apache serve any php files but the index.php file, which bootstraps the framework. Having all the file types spelled out explicitly helps us think hard about exactly what types of files we allow to be served. In the end, .htaccess will be auto generated separately for each client. –  Emanuel Landeholm Jan 18 '11 at 22:24
    
Re: user id and page id. We use a thin wrapper around PHP:s native session handler for non REST-ful stuff. User id we would store in the session and page id probably as an URI argument. –  Emanuel Landeholm Jan 18 '11 at 22:28

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