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How can I get a random point within a ring? Like, the space between two concentric circles. I make the circles in code myself so I know the radius, etc. This is for a game I am working on where I am spacing the enemies out in waves, or different rings spaced from the center of the field. I was thinking the only way is some kind of loop that checks points or something. As3

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

Another solution besides fuzzyTew's to create uniform density distribution w/o having to loop + reject (which is expensive for narrow rings), is to use knowledge of the cumulative distribution function for radius. (Rings are evenly distributed as a function of angle so you can just use a uniform distribution of angle.)

The CDF for a ring with inner radius r1 and outer radius r2 is proportional to r2 - r12 (this is the integral of a term proportional to r dr, which is the probability density of a ring of radius r and infinitesimally small thickness dr). CDF(r=r1) = 0, and CDF(r=r2) = 1, so CDF(r) = (r2 - r12)/(r22 - r12).

So what? Well, now we just need to pick a CDF value q uniformly distributed between 0 and 1, and invert the CDF to get a radius r:

q = (r^2 - r1^2)/(r2^2 - r1^2)
r = sqrt(q*(r2^2 - r1^2) + r1^2)

So for an implementation (apologies for syntax errors, I'm not that familiar w/ AS3 vs. Javascript)

var angle : Number = Math.random() * Math.PI * 2;
var q : Number = Math.random();
var radius : Number = Math.sqrt(q*(r2*r2-r1*r1) + r1*r1);
var x : Number = Math.cos( angle ) * radius;
var y : Number = Math.sin( angle ) * radius;
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idk, Math.Random() only returns a positive value so maybe that's the problem, but all my point are created on the left side – alex Jan 10 '11 at 2:45
    
??? Math.random() is supposed to return a value between 0 and 1. Look at the values for angle -- they should be distributed between 0 and 2pi = approx 6.28318 – Jason S Jan 10 '11 at 13:47

One solution is to consider the point in polar coordinates. Randomize the angle, and then randomize the distance from the centre:

var angle : Number = Math.random() * Math.PI * 2;
var radius : Number = Math.random() * (outerRadius - innerRadius) + innerRadius;
var x : Number = Math.cos( angle ) * radius;
var y : Number = Math.sin( angle ) * radius;

However, the above polar solution will give an increased density for points chosen towards the inner ring. If you need a precisely even distribution, one solution is to randomly pick points in the square surrounding the ring, discarding points not in the ring:

var x : Number;
var y : Number;
var radiusSquared : Number;
var outerRadiusSquared : Number = outerRadius * outerRadius;
var innerRadiusSquared : Number = innerRadius * innerRadius;
do {
    x = Math.random() * outerRadius * 2 - outerRadius;
    y = Math.random() * outerRadius * 2 - outerRadius;
    radiusSquared = x * x + y * y;
} while ( radiusSquared > outerRadiusSquared || radiusSquared < innerRadiusSquared );

Alternatively the polar solution can be weighted to give an even distribution. I think this is how to do it, but I'm not sure:

var angle : Number = Math.random() * Math.PI * 2;
var outerRadiusSquared : Number = outerRadius * outerRadius;
var innerRadiusSquared : Number = innerRadius * innerRadius;
var radius : Number = Math.sqrt( outerRadiusSquared + Math.random() * (innerRadiusSquared - outerRadiusSquared) )
var x : Number = Math.cos( angle ) * radius;
var y : Number = Math.sin( angle ) * radius;
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lol, sorry we haven't learned polar graphs in school yet, I'm supposed to learn that this semester. But I understand your code. – alex Jan 9 '11 at 16:31
    
why would the first solution give an increased density of points near the inner ring? – adamk Jan 10 '11 at 10:25
    
@adamk : The point is evenly distributed along a given circumference, and the radius is evenly distributed between the two radii. The inner circumference is shorter than the outer circumference, so N random points placed in it will be closer together than N random points placed at the outer edge. Imagine a very tiny inner radius -- points placed on it will be packed closely compared to points placed at the outer edge. For even packing, the inner radius must be chosen less frequently than the outer. @Jason S's answer had lots of great google keywords. – fuzzyTew Jan 10 '11 at 14:14
    
Cool thanks a lot, so obvious now that you've explained it! – adamk Jan 10 '11 at 14:23

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