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In PHP you can just use $_POST for POST and $_GET for GET (Query string) variables. What's the equivalent in Python?

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Are you writing a CGI script, mod_python, or Django (or other framework) application? The answer hinges on a bit more info... –  Rob Jan 21 '09 at 4:03
    
can you provide sample code for each of these? –  Click Upvote Jan 21 '09 at 4:26
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CGI, mod_python, Django, CherryPy and Pylons aren't code samples. They're Python Web Frameworks that handle GET and POST. See wiki.python.org/moin/WebFrameworks for information. Your question -- as asked -- cannot be answered. –  S.Lott Jan 21 '09 at 11:19
    
-1: No web framework identified. –  S.Lott Jan 21 '09 at 12:40
48  
i didn't know that this depended on frameworks when i asked this question.. sorry for not being born with the knowledge of how every programming language in the world works –  Click Upvote Jan 21 '09 at 14:51
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5 Answers

up vote 110 down vote accepted

suppose you're posting a html form with this:

<input type="text" name="username">

If using raw cgi:

import cgi
form = cgi.FieldStorage()
print form["username"]

If using Django or Pylons:

print request.GET['username'] # for GET form method
print request.POST['username'] # for POST form method

Using Turbogears, Cherrypy:

from cherrypy import request
print request.params['username']

Web.py:

form = web.input()
print form.username

Werkzeug:

print request.form['username']

If using Cherrypy or Turbogears, you can also define your handler function taking a parameter directly:

def index(self, username):
    print username

Google App Engine:

class SomeHandler(webapp2.RequestHandler):
    def post(self):
        name = self.request.get('username') # this will get the value from the field named username
        self.response.write(name) # this will write on the document

So you really will have to choose one of those frameworks.

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6  
Using import cgi, isn't it print form["username"].value? –  J. Katzwinkel Feb 18 '13 at 0:20
    
I am using Bottle which I believe uses wsgi, could anyone post the equivalent to use in that scenario? The above response is the clearest explanation I have come across, it just doesn't include my scenario. –  user1063287 Sep 21 '13 at 12:16
    
FieldStorage is broken in python3, you may experience issues with it. bugs.python.org/issue6234 –  NuclearPeon Oct 1 '13 at 0:09
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They are stored in the CGI fieldstorage object.

import cgi
form = cgi.FieldStorage()

print "The user entered %s" % form.getvalue("uservalue")
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1  
-1. there are quite a few representation of the request object, depending on the libs/framework used. –  bruno desthuilliers Jan 21 '09 at 9:42
8  
I'm not sure why you did -1. I mean, what I gave works. Perhaps he is unable to use a framework. ALso, don't most frameworks just use this in the background? –  Evan Fosmark Jan 21 '09 at 20:37
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Was stupid to do -1, I've +1 to balance it, plus I think this is the best method as it returns a sting (which is what's asked for) –  jdborg Sep 24 '12 at 15:55
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I've found nosklo's answer very extensive and useful! For those, like myself, who might find accessing the raw request data directly also useful, I would like to add the way to do that:

import os, sys

# the query string, which contains the raw GET data
# (For example, for http://example.com/myscript.py?a=b&c=d&e
# this is "a=b&c=d&e")
os.getenv("QUERY_STRING")

# the raw POST data
sys.stdin.read()
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5  
Thank you so much. Getting the raw data is always my step #1 –  James Tomasino Jul 30 '13 at 15:41
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It somewhat depends on what you use as a CGI framework, but they are available in dictionaries accessible to the program. I'd point you to the docs, but I'm not getting through to python.org right now. But this note on mail.python.org will give you a first pointer. Look at the CGI and URLLIB Python libs for more.

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If you're not ambitious enough to follow a link, I'm not ambitious enough to cut and paste if from the link. –  Charlie Martin Jan 21 '09 at 17:37
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Python is only a language, to get GET and POST data, you need a web framework or toolkit written in Python. Django is one, as Charlie points out, the cgi and urllib standard modules are others. Also available are Turbogears, Pylons, CherryPy, web.py, mod_python, fastcgi, etc, etc.

In Django, your view functions receive a request argument which has request.GET and request.POST. Other frameworks will do it differently.

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5  
"to get GET and POST data, you need a web framework or toolkit written in Python" - Simply not true –  James Tomasino Jul 30 '13 at 15:42
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