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We can use for loop and while loop for same purpose. in what means they effect our code if I use for instead of while? same question arises between if-else and switch-case? how to decide what to use? for example which one you would prefer?

This code:

int main()
{
   int n = 10;

   for(int i=0;i<n;i++)
    {
        do_something();
    }
    return 0;
}

Or this code:

int main()
{
    int n=10,i=0;

    while(i<n)
    {
          do_something();
          i++;
    }
    return 0;
}

if using for or while loop does not effect the code by any means then may I know What was the need to make 2 solution for same problem?

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1  
Removed the C tag as there is no cin in C. –  Puppy Jan 9 '11 at 17:57
    
1  
I slightly altered the title and put the [c] tag back after removing the cin as this question certainly spans the entire C/C++ programmer base. –  SiegeX Jan 9 '11 at 18:04

8 Answers 8

up vote 10 down vote accepted

If you know the number of iterations the loop should run beforehand, I would recommend the for construct. While loops are good for when the loop's terminating condition happens at some yet-to-be determined time.

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+1 I agree. ;) ..char lim.. –  BlackBear Jan 9 '11 at 17:43

Use whichever one makes the intention of your code clearest.

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By no means they affect your program the way it works ! Its the matter of ease to understand better.

switch(i)     // Once finding your case, you can easily know where the switch ends
              // and thus the next statement of execution
{
    case 1: break ;
    case 2: break ;
    // .....
    case 10: break ;
    default:break ;
}

if( i==1 )   // Here you have the pain of finding where the last else if ends !
{}
else if( i==2)
{}
// ...
else if( i==10)
{}

However, it is a matter of taste. I prefer switch.

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and what about if-else and switch case –  Atul Jan 9 '11 at 17:41
    
@Atul As every one suggested it is matter of readability and ease in understanding. –  Mahesh Jan 9 '11 at 17:43
1  
@Atul: probably the switch is better when you have to test many conditions at the same time. –  BlackBear Jan 9 '11 at 17:51

In general, a for loop might be preferable for simple loops, since the logic of the loop is contained in a single line:

for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i) {...}

However, sometimes we need more complex logic or flow control. A while loop allows us to implement more complicated loops. For example, suppose we only want to increment the counter variable under certain conditions:

int i = 0;
while (i < 10)
{
  if (some_condition) ++i;
  else if (some_other_condition) { ... }
  else break;
}
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I don't see this argument. Just replace the first two lines with for(int i = 0;i < 10;) and you have the same loop. (And have the bonus of restricting the scope if i). –  Billy ONeal Jan 9 '11 at 19:31
    
@Billy ONeal, true - but following that to the extreme we can conclude that while is totally superfluous, since any while (condition) can be replaced with for (;condition;). It's subjective, but I think while may be a clearer choice if the counter variable is updated conditionally, since someone reading the code usually expects a typical for loop to include a (non-conditional) counter-variable update. –  Charles Salvia Jan 9 '11 at 19:59

You cannot write while(int i=0, i < n); that is, you've to define i before the while loop; means i exists inside as well as outside the loop.

However, in case of for loop, you can define i right in the for loop itself; and so i doesn't exist outside the loop. That is one difference. Just because of this difference, I like for more than while. And use while rarely, when for makes thing more cumbersome!

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Just use the one that makes the code readable and logical.

In some cases the compiler (gcc at least) will be able to optimize a very slightly better than a for loop doing the same thing. If I remember correctly that optimization is only about few clock cycles so it probably never will have any noticeable affect on the performance.

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There are some very subtle differences..

  • scope of loop variable(s), for example, with the for loop i has local scope, with a while this has to be defined before (which means it is available after, of course you can do that with for as well..)
  • continue, with a for loop, variable will be increment/decremented, with a while, you'd have to insert the operation before continue

Frankly, if you need to increment/decrement, a for loop makes sense, if you don't know the bounds, and there is no real increment/decrement, a while loop makes more sense, e.g.

while(some_stream >> input)
{
  // do stuff...
}
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1  
The scope issue is only true for C++... –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 9 '11 at 17:52
2  
..........and C99. –  Charles Salvia Jan 9 '11 at 17:58

I try to prefer the for loop. Why? Because when I see a for loop, I can expect all of the loop bookeeping is kept in a single statement. I can insert break or continue statements without worrying about breaking how the loop operates. And most importantly, the body of the loop focuses on what you actually want the loop to be doing, rather than maintaining the loop itself. If I see a while, then I have to look at and understand the entire loop body before I can understand what iteration pattern the loop uses.

The only place I end up using while is for those few cases where the control of the loop is provided by some outside routine (i.e. FindFirstFileW)

It's all a matter of personal opinion though. Lots of people don't like what I end up doing with for loops because the loop statement often ends up spanning multiple lines.

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