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Consider code like this:

import numpy as np
cimport numpy as np

cdef inline inc(np.ndarray[np.int32_t] arr, int i):
  arr[i]+= 1

def test1(np.ndarray[np.int32_t] arr):
    cdef int i
    for i in xrange(len(arr)):
        inc(arr, i)


def test2(np.ndarray[np.int32_t] arr):
    cdef int i
    for i in xrange(len(arr)):
        arr[i] += 1

I used ipython to measure speed of test1 and test2:

In [7]: timeit ttt.test1(arr)
100 loops, best of 3: 6.13 ms per loop

In [8]: timeit ttt.test2(arr)
100000 loops, best of 3: 9.79 us per loop

Is there a way to optimize test1? Why doesn't cython inline this function as told?

UPDATE: Actually what I need is multidimension code like this:

# cython: infer_types=True
# cython: boundscheck=False
# cython: wraparound=False

import numpy as np
cimport numpy as np

cdef inline inc(np.ndarray[np.int32_t, ndim=2] arr, int i, int j):
  arr[i, j]+= 1

def test1(np.ndarray[np.int32_t, ndim=2] arr):
    cdef int i,j    
    for i in xrange(arr.shape[0]):
        for j in xrange(arr.shape[1]):
            inc(arr, i, j)


def test2(np.ndarray[np.int32_t, ndim=2] arr):    
    cdef int i,j    
    for i in xrange(arr.shape[0]):
        for j in xrange(arr.shape[1]):
            arr[i,j] += 1   

Timing for it:

In [7]: timeit ttt.test1(arr)
1 loops, best of 3: 647 ms per loop

In [8]: timeit ttt.test2(arr)
100 loops, best of 3: 2.07 ms per loop

Explicit inlining gives 300x speedup. And my real function is quite big so inlining it makes code maintainability much worse

UPDATE2:

# cython: infer_types=True
# cython: boundscheck=False
# cython: wraparound=False

import numpy as np
cimport numpy as np

cdef inline inc(np.ndarray[np.float32_t, ndim=2] arr, int i, int j):
  arr[i, j]+= 1

def test1(np.ndarray[np.float32_t, ndim=2] arr):
    cdef int i,j    
    for i in xrange(arr.shape[0]):
        for j in xrange(arr.shape[1]):
            inc(arr, i, j)


def test2(np.ndarray[np.float32_t, ndim=2] arr):    
    cdef int i,j    
    for i in xrange(arr.shape[0]):
        for j in xrange(arr.shape[1]):
            arr[i,j] += 1    

cdef class FastPassingFloat2DArray(object):
    cdef float* data
    cdef int stride0, stride1 
    def __init__(self, np.ndarray[np.float32_t, ndim=2] arr):
        self.data = <float*>arr.data
        self.stride0 = arr.strides[0]/arr.dtype.itemsize
        self.stride1 = arr.strides[1]/arr.dtype.itemsize
    def __getitem__(self, tuple tp):
        cdef int i, j
        cdef float *pr, r
        i, j = tp        
        pr = (self.data + self.stride0*i + self.stride1*j)
        r = pr[0]
        return r
    def __setitem__(self, tuple tp, float value):
        cdef int i, j
        cdef float *pr, r
        i, j = tp        
        pr = (self.data + self.stride0*i + self.stride1*j)
        pr[0] = value        


cdef inline inc2(FastPassingFloat2DArray arr, int i, int j):
    arr[i, j]+= 1


def test3(np.ndarray[np.float32_t, ndim=2] arr):    
    cdef int i,j    
    cdef FastPassingFloat2DArray tmparr = FastPassingFloat2DArray(arr)
    for i in xrange(arr.shape[0]):
        for j in xrange(arr.shape[1]):
            inc2(tmparr, i,j)

Timings:

In [4]: timeit ttt.test1(arr)
1 loops, best of 3: 623 ms per loop

In [5]: timeit ttt.test2(arr)
100 loops, best of 3: 2.29 ms per loop

In [6]: timeit ttt.test3(arr)
1 loops, best of 3: 201 ms per loop
share|improve this question
    
On my machine, the perfomance difference in two dimensions is about 5 % (instead of 30000 %). What versions of Python and Cython are you using? Which C compiler? –  Sven Marnach Jan 10 '11 at 13:09
    
Windows, Python 2.6, Cython 0.14, Gcc 4.5.1. Could you post your 2d code? –  Maxim Jan 10 '11 at 13:25
    
Now I see the difference: I just added ndim=2 to the first version of your code (because I thought this is what you actuallay wanted). If inc() only needs to act on a single integer, just pass a pointer to this single integer to inc() -- something like <int*>(arr.data + i*arr.strides[0] + j*arr.strides[1]). –  Sven Marnach Jan 10 '11 at 13:48
    
I'm using Cython 0.13 on Linux, btw. –  Sven Marnach Jan 10 '11 at 13:49
    
No this simple inc is just an example, really it is complicated function, that accepts array and some indices and does some computation using them. Is it possible to create some cython object, that will hold pointer to data and strides information and provide [] interface like nD array without huge performance penalty (ideally it will inline to code like (data + i*strides[0] + j*strides[1] + ...))? –  Maxim Jan 10 '11 at 14:09
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The problem is that assigning a numpy array (or, equivalently, passing it in as a function argument) is not just a simple assignment, but a "buffer extraction" which populates a struct and pulls out the stride and pointer information into local variables needed for fast indexing. If you're iterating over a moderate number of elements, this O(1) overhead is easily amortized over the loop, but that is certainly not the case for small functions.

Improving this is high on many people's wishlist, but it's a non-trivial change. See, e.g., the discussion at http://groups.google.com/group/cython-users/browse_thread/thread/8fc8686315d7f3fe

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, that was my question. I will just accept your answer for now. –  Maxim Jan 21 '11 at 14:36
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You are passing the array to inc() as a Python object of type numpy.ndarray. Passing Python objects is expensive due to issues like reference counting, and it seems to prevent inlining. If you pass the array the C way, i.e. as a pointer, test1() becomes even faster than test2() on my machine:

cimport numpy as np

cdef inline inc(int* arr, int i):
    arr[i] += 1

def test1(np.ndarray[np.int32_t] arr):
    cdef int i
    for i in xrange(len(arr)):
        inc(<int*>arr.data, i)
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, and what about 2d and 3d arrays? –  Maxim Jan 9 '11 at 22:20
    
@Maxim: Your own code only works for one-dimensional arrays, so I provided a faster version for this case only. (Note that ndim=1 is implicit if you don't provide an explicit ndim parameter to ndarray.) When I add ndim=2 to your code and time test1() and test2() with a 50x50 array, there is hardly any performance difference between them on by machine. –  Sven Marnach Jan 10 '11 at 12:30
    
Please see update in the question. Here I get huge performance difference on ndim=2 also (which is expected because if inc is not inlined it acquires and releases numpy buffer on every call). And passing just pointer is not enough in nD case, because you will also need to know sizes in each dimension, and passing them all makes function look bad, and makes each array access complicated.... –  Maxim Jan 10 '11 at 12:52
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