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i have an ajax call and i am trying to parse the returned page for #viewport, thereby removing the header and footer of the returned page. but find() cannot locate the div.

my original function:

        function(event) {
            $.ajax({
                type: this.method,
                url: this.action,
                data: $(this).serialize(),
                datatype: "html",
                success: function(data) {
                    alert(data);
                    var respHTML = $(data).find("#viewport");
                    alert(respHTML.length);
                    $("#contacts_sidebar").html(respHTML);
                }
            });
            return false;
        }

in the alert(data), i definitely see <div id="viewport">, but alert(respHTML.length) displays 0. if i change the selector to "table.someclass", it would locate it. but selectors such as "head" and "body" returns 0 as well.

i know it's definitely there b/c i replace the success handler with the following workaround:

        success: function(data) {
            var respHTML;
            var d=$(data);
            for (i=0; i<d.length; i++) {
                if (d[i]["id"] === "viewport") {
                    respHTML = d[i]["innerHTML"];
                    break;
                }
            }
            $("#contacts_sidebar").html(respHTML);
        }

am i missing something? the workaround works, just ugly.

thanks very much!

share|improve this question
3  
You would not be committing the sin of using the same "id" value for multiple elements, would you be? –  Pointy Jan 9 '11 at 19:29
    
did you already add the element to the DOM before looking up the ID? or is it just plain HTML? –  Caspar Kleijne Jan 9 '11 at 19:30
    
@Caspar Kleijne he's implicitly adding the returned HTML to a document fragment by writing $(data) –  Pointy Jan 9 '11 at 19:31
1  
@Pointy yes I you are right, sorry, so I think that #Viewport is the root element and will not be found within $(data) (when using find), however when the hack is used, also the rootelement is inspected, and the first item found is returned (that is viewport), if there were duplicate ID's I think at least one was found. –  Caspar Kleijne Jan 9 '11 at 19:35
    
Hm... Imagine this... I have div with id 'content'. Now, I'd like to load external data, with new information. I would do ajax call to some external file (not that one, that generated curent page and all HTML code that I dont need at this time), which returns data I want to be displayed in that div with 'content' id, nothing more, nothing less... No filtering needed. For this, use then simple .load() jQuery method –  Andreyco Jan 9 '11 at 19:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If '#viewport' is at the top level of the response HTML, you'll need .filter() instead, since .find() only look inside the top level elements.

   success: function(data) {
        alert(data);
        var respHTML = $(data).filter("#viewport");
        alert(respHTML.length);
        $("#contacts_sidebar").html(respHTML);
    }

When passing HTML to jQuery, you can't rely on finding the <html> <head> <body> tags in a cross browser manner.

If your response does include an entire HTML document, I would pare it down to only the content you actually want if at all possible.

Another option may be to do something like this:

var respHTML = $('<div>' + data + '</div>').find("#viewport");

...but I wouldn't guarantee the result.

share|improve this answer
1  
I think you're probably right about what's going on. –  Pointy Jan 9 '11 at 19:38
    
this works. thank you so much!!!! –  steve Jan 20 '11 at 3:04

You can use the .load() function to parse through the returned page for a specific element.

Check out http://api.jquery.com/load and look at the section about loading page fragments.

share|improve this answer
    
He's posting a form, so .load() really won't help much (though I understand the facility you're referring to). –  Pointy Jan 9 '11 at 19:34

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